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SparkNotes: Their Eyes Were Watching God: Important.

18 Jan 2017 21:24 | Author: redrabbit979 | Category: Bodycare business plan

5. What are the differences between the language of the men and that of Janie and the other women? How do the differences in language reflect the two groups' approaches to life, power, relationships, and self-realization? How do the novel's first two paragraphs point to these differences?

6. In what ways does Janie conform to or diverge from the assumptions that underlie the men's attitudes toward women? How would you explain Hurston's depiction of violence toward women? Does the novel substantiate Janie's statement that "Sometimes God gits familiar wid us womenfolks too and talks His inside business"?

Comments
  1. author
    organicostrich113 18 Jan 2017 06:49

    Discussion Questions  
    1. What kind of God are the eyes of Hurston''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s characters watching? What is the nature of that God and of their watching? Do any of them question God?

    2. What is the importance of the concept of horizon? How do Janie and each of her men widen her horizons? What is the significance of the novel''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s final sentences in this regard?

    This abstract, almost allegorical paragraph opens the novel. Janie has not yet appeared, striding back through Eatonville after a long disappearance. 

    However, the word "men" is hardly synonymous with mankind — Hurston describes women in the next paragraph, women who "forget all those thins they don''''''''''''''''t want to remember" and display much more pragmatism than men. In this way, readers begin to understand the importance of gender in the novel, as well as Janie''''''''''''''''s own curious position in society. Her desire for independence and experience seems more stereotypically masculine than feminine, alienating her from men and women alike. 

    When Nanny catches sight of Janie kissing Johnny Taylor, she calls her in to the house and broaches the topic of marriage. Janie is a woman now, she explains, and she should therefore marry a "decent" suitor like Logan Killicks, rather than someone "trashy." Janie''''''''s resistance leads Nanny to describe their world''''''''s social hierarchy: white men at the top, black women at the bottom. 

    Hurston here introduces the symbolic mule, which comes to stand for victimization, particularly that of many of the novel''''''''s black women. Again and again Janie pushes back against her fate, a life of thankless physical and emotional labor without freedom or joy. Logan Killicks, her first husband, even buys her a mule and Janie sees her own plight reflected in the animal. 

    A Guide to Harlem Renaissance Materials
    The Library of Congress presents a variety of materials on Hurston and other Harlem Renaissance artists.

    Harlem Renaissance Authors and the Impact on the 21st Century
    As part of a study of the Harlem Renaissance, students will do research on a Harlem Renaissance author. Individually, students will use websites to gain information about the author and the author''''s impact in literature and society. Students will relate writings from the author to issues found in the 21st century. Students will then create a photostory of the author to be shared with the class.

    Book Reviews  
    Alice Walker ( The Color Purple ) was responsible for kindling our current interest in this lovely but once neglected work. Their Ey es was a favorite of hers, now a favorite of many, and "short-listed" as a favorite of book clubs everywhere.
    A LitLovers LitPick     ( Apr. ''08 )


    A classic of black literature, Their Eyes Were Watching God belongs in the same category—with that of William Faulkner, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and Ernest Hemingway—of enduring American literature.
    Saturday Review

  2. author
    browngorilla836 17 Jan 2017 23:19

    Discussion Questions  
    1. What kind of God are the eyes of Hurston''''''''s characters watching? What is the nature of that God and of their watching? Do any of them question God?

    2. What is the importance of the concept of horizon? How do Janie and each of her men widen her horizons? What is the significance of the novel''''''''s final sentences in this regard?

    This abstract, almost allegorical paragraph opens the novel. Janie has not yet appeared, striding back through Eatonville after a long disappearance. 

    However, the word "men" is hardly synonymous with mankind — Hurston describes women in the next paragraph, women who "forget all those thins they don''t want to remember" and display much more pragmatism than men. In this way, readers begin to understand the importance of gender in the novel, as well as Janie''s own curious position in society. Her desire for independence and experience seems more stereotypically masculine than feminine, alienating her from men and women alike. 

    When Nanny catches sight of Janie kissing Johnny Taylor, she calls her in to the house and broaches the topic of marriage. Janie is a woman now, she explains, and she should therefore marry a "decent" suitor like Logan Killicks, rather than someone "trashy." Janie's resistance leads Nanny to describe their world's social hierarchy: white men at the top, black women at the bottom. 

    Hurston here introduces the symbolic mule, which comes to stand for victimization, particularly that of many of the novel's black women. Again and again Janie pushes back against her fate, a life of thankless physical and emotional labor without freedom or joy. Logan Killicks, her first husband, even buys her a mule and Janie sees her own plight reflected in the animal. 

  3. author
    blackswan174 18 Jan 2017 03:06

    .Their Eyes Were Watching God. After students complete extra discussion questions,. Students will answer questions to demonstrate their knowledge and.

  4. author
    purplegorilla726 18 Jan 2017 01:13

    Discussion Questions  
    1. What kind of God are the eyes of Hurston''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s characters watching? What is the nature of that God and of their watching? Do any of them question God?

    2. What is the importance of the concept of horizon? How do Janie and each of her men widen her horizons? What is the significance of the novel''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s final sentences in this regard?

    This abstract, almost allegorical paragraph opens the novel. Janie has not yet appeared, striding back through Eatonville after a long disappearance. 

    However, the word "men" is hardly synonymous with mankind — Hurston describes women in the next paragraph, women who "forget all those thins they don''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t want to remember" and display much more pragmatism than men. In this way, readers begin to understand the importance of gender in the novel, as well as Janie''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s own curious position in society. Her desire for independence and experience seems more stereotypically masculine than feminine, alienating her from men and women alike. 

    When Nanny catches sight of Janie kissing Johnny Taylor, she calls her in to the house and broaches the topic of marriage. Janie is a woman now, she explains, and she should therefore marry a "decent" suitor like Logan Killicks, rather than someone "trashy." Janie''''''''''''''''s resistance leads Nanny to describe their world''''''''''''''''s social hierarchy: white men at the top, black women at the bottom. 

    Hurston here introduces the symbolic mule, which comes to stand for victimization, particularly that of many of the novel''''''''''''''''s black women. Again and again Janie pushes back against her fate, a life of thankless physical and emotional labor without freedom or joy. Logan Killicks, her first husband, even buys her a mule and Janie sees her own plight reflected in the animal. 

    A Guide to Harlem Renaissance Materials
    The Library of Congress presents a variety of materials on Hurston and other Harlem Renaissance artists.

    Harlem Renaissance Authors and the Impact on the 21st Century
    As part of a study of the Harlem Renaissance, students will do research on a Harlem Renaissance author. Individually, students will use websites to gain information about the author and the author''''''''s impact in literature and society. Students will relate writings from the author to issues found in the 21st century. Students will then create a photostory of the author to be shared with the class.

    Book Reviews  
    Alice Walker ( The Color Purple ) was responsible for kindling our current interest in this lovely but once neglected work. Their Ey es was a favorite of hers, now a favorite of many, and "short-listed" as a favorite of book clubs everywhere.
    A LitLovers LitPick     ( Apr. ''''08 )


    A classic of black literature, Their Eyes Were Watching God belongs in the same category—with that of William Faulkner, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and Ernest Hemingway—of enduring American literature.
    Saturday Review

    This passage from Chapter 2 marks the beginning of Janie’s spiritual and sexual awakening. She is a young girl under the care of her grandmother, and this incident propels her upon her quest to reach her horizon. The embrace between the bee and the flowers imprints itself upon Janie as an idealized vision of love a moment of mutual, reciprocal fulfillment. The flowers arch to meet the arriving bee, and the consequent union of the two provides each partner something desired. Janie searches for such a give-and-take love over the course of the entire novel.

    reading this book will send you into a deep depression because after you finish you will realize you spent hours translating this book into real english in your head and then you gained absolutely nothing from it.

  5. author
    browngoose700 18 Jan 2017 07:22

    I d say i look more high chest area, bordering on head. Definitely always use peripheral vision. Looking in the eyes is a rookie mistake - only see one spot and you can get sort of hypnotized for a second -especially if they are bouncing back and forward.

  6. author
    silversnake907 18 Jan 2017 07:40

    Discussion Questions  
    1. What kind of God are the eyes of Hurston's characters watching? What is the nature of that God and of their watching? Do any of them question God?

    2. What is the importance of the concept of horizon? How do Janie and each of her men widen her horizons? What is the significance of the novel's final sentences in this regard?

  7. author
    Влада Хохрякова 18 Jan 2017 00:48

    West Florida, Eatonville, Florida, and the Everglades during the early 1900s. The slave culture of the southern U.S., though dead by the time of Janie’s life, has a profound effect on the book, grounding all discussion of racism and emerging most strongly in the character of Nanny. From Shmoop Lit

  8. author
    tinywolf832 18 Jan 2017 07:58

    Discussion Questions  
    1. What kind of God are the eyes of Hurston''s characters watching? What is the nature of that God and of their watching? Do any of them question God?

    2. What is the importance of the concept of horizon? How do Janie and each of her men widen her horizons? What is the significance of the novel''s final sentences in this regard?

  9. author
    User1488157132 17 Jan 2017 23:25

    I don t know if you are referring to a soap opra in R&S.Is it something New Age?

  10. author
    乃ԾレԾ レÐ\Ц/ 18 Jan 2017 01:44

    Discussion Questions  
    1. What kind of God are the eyes of Hurston''''''''''''''''s characters watching? What is the nature of that God and of their watching? Do any of them question God?

    2. What is the importance of the concept of horizon? How do Janie and each of her men widen her horizons? What is the significance of the novel''''''''''''''''s final sentences in this regard?

    This abstract, almost allegorical paragraph opens the novel. Janie has not yet appeared, striding back through Eatonville after a long disappearance. 

    However, the word "men" is hardly synonymous with mankind — Hurston describes women in the next paragraph, women who "forget all those thins they don''''t want to remember" and display much more pragmatism than men. In this way, readers begin to understand the importance of gender in the novel, as well as Janie''''s own curious position in society. Her desire for independence and experience seems more stereotypically masculine than feminine, alienating her from men and women alike. 

    When Nanny catches sight of Janie kissing Johnny Taylor, she calls her in to the house and broaches the topic of marriage. Janie is a woman now, she explains, and she should therefore marry a "decent" suitor like Logan Killicks, rather than someone "trashy." Janie''s resistance leads Nanny to describe their world''s social hierarchy: white men at the top, black women at the bottom. 

    Hurston here introduces the symbolic mule, which comes to stand for victimization, particularly that of many of the novel''s black women. Again and again Janie pushes back against her fate, a life of thankless physical and emotional labor without freedom or joy. Logan Killicks, her first husband, even buys her a mule and Janie sees her own plight reflected in the animal. 

    A Guide to Harlem Renaissance Materials
    The Library of Congress presents a variety of materials on Hurston and other Harlem Renaissance artists.

    Harlem Renaissance Authors and the Impact on the 21st Century
    As part of a study of the Harlem Renaissance, students will do research on a Harlem Renaissance author. Individually, students will use websites to gain information about the author and the author's impact in literature and society. Students will relate writings from the author to issues found in the 21st century. Students will then create a photostory of the author to be shared with the class.

  11. author
    miyuu 18 Jan 2017 04:20

    Discussion Questions  
    1. What kind of God are the eyes of Hurston''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s characters watching? What is the nature of that God and of their watching? Do any of them question God?

    2. What is the importance of the concept of horizon? How do Janie and each of her men widen her horizons? What is the significance of the novel''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s final sentences in this regard?

    This abstract, almost allegorical paragraph opens the novel. Janie has not yet appeared, striding back through Eatonville after a long disappearance. 

    However, the word "men" is hardly synonymous with mankind — Hurston describes women in the next paragraph, women who "forget all those thins they don''''''''t want to remember" and display much more pragmatism than men. In this way, readers begin to understand the importance of gender in the novel, as well as Janie''''''''s own curious position in society. Her desire for independence and experience seems more stereotypically masculine than feminine, alienating her from men and women alike. 

    When Nanny catches sight of Janie kissing Johnny Taylor, she calls her in to the house and broaches the topic of marriage. Janie is a woman now, she explains, and she should therefore marry a "decent" suitor like Logan Killicks, rather than someone "trashy." Janie''''s resistance leads Nanny to describe their world''''s social hierarchy: white men at the top, black women at the bottom. 

    Hurston here introduces the symbolic mule, which comes to stand for victimization, particularly that of many of the novel''''s black women. Again and again Janie pushes back against her fate, a life of thankless physical and emotional labor without freedom or joy. Logan Killicks, her first husband, even buys her a mule and Janie sees her own plight reflected in the animal. 

    A Guide to Harlem Renaissance Materials
    The Library of Congress presents a variety of materials on Hurston and other Harlem Renaissance artists.

    Harlem Renaissance Authors and the Impact on the 21st Century
    As part of a study of the Harlem Renaissance, students will do research on a Harlem Renaissance author. Individually, students will use websites to gain information about the author and the author''s impact in literature and society. Students will relate writings from the author to issues found in the 21st century. Students will then create a photostory of the author to be shared with the class.

    Book Reviews  
    Alice Walker ( The Color Purple ) was responsible for kindling our current interest in this lovely but once neglected work. Their Ey es was a favorite of hers, now a favorite of many, and "short-listed" as a favorite of book clubs everywhere.
    A LitLovers LitPick     ( Apr. '08 )


    A classic of black literature, Their Eyes Were Watching God belongs in the same category—with that of William Faulkner, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and Ernest Hemingway—of enduring American literature.
    Saturday Review

  12. author
    User1488638191 17 Jan 2017 23:44

    Discussion Questions  
    1. What kind of God are the eyes of Hurston''''s characters watching? What is the nature of that God and of their watching? Do any of them question God?

    2. What is the importance of the concept of horizon? How do Janie and each of her men widen her horizons? What is the significance of the novel''''s final sentences in this regard?

    This abstract, almost allegorical paragraph opens the novel. Janie has not yet appeared, striding back through Eatonville after a long disappearance. 

    However, the word "men" is hardly synonymous with mankind — Hurston describes women in the next paragraph, women who "forget all those thins they don't want to remember" and display much more pragmatism than men. In this way, readers begin to understand the importance of gender in the novel, as well as Janie's own curious position in society. Her desire for independence and experience seems more stereotypically masculine than feminine, alienating her from men and women alike. 

  13. author
    blueswan830 17 Jan 2017 22:54

    Order essay here their eyes were watching god discussion questions

    5. What are the differences between the language of the men and that of Janie and the other women? How do the differences in language reflect the two groups'' approaches to life, power, relationships, and self-realization? How do the novel''s first two paragraphs point to these differences?

    6. In what ways does Janie conform to or diverge from the assumptions that underlie the men''s attitudes toward women? How would you explain Hurston''s depiction of violence toward women? Does the novel substantiate Janie''s statement that "Sometimes God gits familiar wid us womenfolks too and talks His inside business"?

  14. author
    lazyduck456 17 Jan 2017 23:14

    Discussion Questions  
    1. What kind of God are the eyes of Hurston''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s characters watching? What is the nature of that God and of their watching? Do any of them question God?

    2. What is the importance of the concept of horizon? How do Janie and each of her men widen her horizons? What is the significance of the novel''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s final sentences in this regard?

    This abstract, almost allegorical paragraph opens the novel. Janie has not yet appeared, striding back through Eatonville after a long disappearance. 

    However, the word "men" is hardly synonymous with mankind — Hurston describes women in the next paragraph, women who "forget all those thins they don''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t want to remember" and display much more pragmatism than men. In this way, readers begin to understand the importance of gender in the novel, as well as Janie''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s own curious position in society. Her desire for independence and experience seems more stereotypically masculine than feminine, alienating her from men and women alike. 

    When Nanny catches sight of Janie kissing Johnny Taylor, she calls her in to the house and broaches the topic of marriage. Janie is a woman now, she explains, and she should therefore marry a "decent" suitor like Logan Killicks, rather than someone "trashy." Janie''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s resistance leads Nanny to describe their world''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s social hierarchy: white men at the top, black women at the bottom. 

    Hurston here introduces the symbolic mule, which comes to stand for victimization, particularly that of many of the novel''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s black women. Again and again Janie pushes back against her fate, a life of thankless physical and emotional labor without freedom or joy. Logan Killicks, her first husband, even buys her a mule and Janie sees her own plight reflected in the animal. 

    A Guide to Harlem Renaissance Materials
    The Library of Congress presents a variety of materials on Hurston and other Harlem Renaissance artists.

    Harlem Renaissance Authors and the Impact on the 21st Century
    As part of a study of the Harlem Renaissance, students will do research on a Harlem Renaissance author. Individually, students will use websites to gain information about the author and the author''''''''''''''''s impact in literature and society. Students will relate writings from the author to issues found in the 21st century. Students will then create a photostory of the author to be shared with the class.

    Book Reviews  
    Alice Walker ( The Color Purple ) was responsible for kindling our current interest in this lovely but once neglected work. Their Ey es was a favorite of hers, now a favorite of many, and "short-listed" as a favorite of book clubs everywhere.
    A LitLovers LitPick     ( Apr. ''''''''08 )


    A classic of black literature, Their Eyes Were Watching God belongs in the same category—with that of William Faulkner, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and Ernest Hemingway—of enduring American literature.
    Saturday Review

    This passage from Chapter 2 marks the beginning of Janie’s spiritual and sexual awakening. She is a young girl under the care of her grandmother, and this incident propels her upon her quest to reach her horizon. The embrace between the bee and the flowers imprints itself upon Janie as an idealized vision of love a moment of mutual, reciprocal fulfillment. The flowers arch to meet the arriving bee, and the consequent union of the two provides each partner something desired. Janie searches for such a give-and-take love over the course of the entire novel.

    reading this book will send you into a deep depression because after you finish you will realize you spent hours translating this book into real english in your head and then you gained absolutely nothing from it.

    There is somewhat of a controversy in Christianity regarding the identification of the Nephilim and sons of God mentioned in the Genesis flood account (Genesis 6:2-4). Are the sons of God the human offspring of the godly line of Seth or angelic beings (demons)? Were the Nephilim a race of giants that existed before and after the flood or is the word just a generic term describing large strong people?

    The passage describes the Nephilim as being men twice, using two different Hebrew words. It does not use the Hebrew words used to describe angels ( angels, cherubim, and seraphim ). It s pretty obvious from the context that God was not happy about what was going on between the sons of God, the Nephilim, and the daughters of men. Let s go on to examine how other biblical passages use these terms.