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A Way with Words

18 Jan 2017 21:24 | Author: whiteelephant439 | Category: Literature review on 360 degree apprisal

Questions and Answers from the Community. It doesn't. The page that you see when you ask a new question is the page that everyone will see..

Comments
  1. author
    brownwolf691 18 Jan 2017 09:12

    Yes it will because the united states has a different system code.

  2. author
    User1488944344 18 Jan 2017 09:34

    Martin Allinger/iStock/Getty Images. I'm going to tell you the weirdest and, yet, most obviously true thing you've ever heard: You're not a person.

  3. author
    User1487846529 18 Jan 2017 06:18

    You must remember that this is pure escape fiction. Thus the mood is pretty much straight forward. Assuming we care that Rainsford lives through this, the moods are exciting, fearful and ominous (that crazy Zaroff even lives in a gothic-castle)

    Rainsford is imparting his belief that humans are superior to animals. that animals don''''''''t know fear.. that they have no feelings. Whitney, however, believes that anilmals do know fear. Shortly after this conversation, Rainsford will learn.

    You can create printable tests and worksheets from these The Most Dangerous Game questions! Select one or more questions using the checkboxes above each question. Then click the add selected questions to a test button before moving to another page.

    The Most Dangerous Game opens with a conversation between two men, Whitney and Rainsford. The pair are on a yacht headed to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. At the time of the story, they find themselves somewhere in the Caribbean. Both men are aficionados of big-game hunting. They discuss the ability of an animal to understand a hunt. Rainsford believes that animals are incapable of feeling or understanding any human emotion.

    Shortly after their discussion, Whitney retires for the evening. Rainsford decides to stay on deck to smoke his pipe. He suddenly hears the sound of gunshots and in his attempt to see the source of the sound, he falls into the water. After a brief moment of panic, Rainsford rallies and decides to swim toward the source of the gunshots. When he finally makes it ashore, he falls asleep.

    The violence in “The Most Dangerous Game” is not just physical—it’s psychological. Connell sets up the dilemma from the get-go whether hunting is a brutal activity or an amusing sport. Deciding on one or the other depends a lot on how you feel about animals. "Don't talk rot, Whitney," said Rainsford. "You're a big-game hunter, not a philosopher. Who cares how a jaguar feels?" (1.10). Rainsford’s attitude suggests his willingness to commit violence without considering any of the ethical implications.

    We quickly forget about that position once we meet General Zaroff, who ups the ante on the lack-of-compassion scale. Although he knows that human beings have feelings, that doesn’t stop him from committing violence against them. But at least he gives them a choice: be whipped by Ivan (who used to offer his skill to none other than the czar himself) or grab your gear and hit the path. Thanks for the options, chief.

  4. author
    User1489400191 18 Jan 2017 06:19

    You must remember that this is pure escape fiction. Thus the mood is pretty much straight forward. Assuming we care that Rainsford lives through this, the moods are exciting, fearful and ominous (that crazy Zaroff even lives in a gothic-castle)

    Rainsford is imparting his belief that humans are superior to animals. that animals don''''''''''''''''t know fear.. that they have no feelings. Whitney, however, believes that anilmals do know fear. Shortly after this conversation, Rainsford will learn.

    You can create printable tests and worksheets from these The Most Dangerous Game questions! Select one or more questions using the checkboxes above each question. Then click the add selected questions to a test button before moving to another page.

    The Most Dangerous Game opens with a conversation between two men, Whitney and Rainsford. The pair are on a yacht headed to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. At the time of the story, they find themselves somewhere in the Caribbean. Both men are aficionados of big-game hunting. They discuss the ability of an animal to understand a hunt. Rainsford believes that animals are incapable of feeling or understanding any human emotion.

    Shortly after their discussion, Whitney retires for the evening. Rainsford decides to stay on deck to smoke his pipe. He suddenly hears the sound of gunshots and in his attempt to see the source of the sound, he falls into the water. After a brief moment of panic, Rainsford rallies and decides to swim toward the source of the gunshots. When he finally makes it ashore, he falls asleep.

    The violence in “The Most Dangerous Game” is not just physical—it’s psychological. Connell sets up the dilemma from the get-go whether hunting is a brutal activity or an amusing sport. Deciding on one or the other depends a lot on how you feel about animals. "Don''t talk rot, Whitney," said Rainsford. "You''re a big-game hunter, not a philosopher. Who cares how a jaguar feels?" (1.10). Rainsford’s attitude suggests his willingness to commit violence without considering any of the ethical implications.

    We quickly forget about that position once we meet General Zaroff, who ups the ante on the lack-of-compassion scale. Although he knows that human beings have feelings, that doesn’t stop him from committing violence against them. But at least he gives them a choice: be whipped by Ivan (who used to offer his skill to none other than the czar himself) or grab your gear and hit the path. Thanks for the options, chief.

    Whitney then decides to turn in for the night, but Rainsford opts to smoke his pipe on the afterdeck for a while. Suddenly, he hears three gunshots in the distance and moves toward the railing of the deck to investigate. Hoisting himself onto the rail to try and get a better look, Rainsford drops his pipe, loses his balance in an attempt to catch it, and accidentally plunges into the water. His cries for help go unanswered, and the yacht quickly disappears into the night.

    Rainsford decides to swim in the gunshots’ direction. He hears the screeching sound of an animal in agony and heads straight for it, until the cries end abruptly with a pistol shot. Exhausted, Rainsford reaches the rocky shore and immediately falls into a deep sleep. He wakes the next afternoon and sets off in search of food, forced to skirt the thick growth of the jungle and walk along the shore. He soon comes to a bloody, torn-up patch of vegetation where a large animal had thrashed about. He finds an empty rifle cartridge nearby.

  5. author
    heavypeacock456 18 Jan 2017 04:36

    You must remember that this is pure escape fiction. Thus the mood is pretty much straight forward. Assuming we care that Rainsford lives through this, the moods are exciting, fearful and ominous (that crazy Zaroff even lives in a gothic-castle)

    Rainsford is imparting his belief that humans are superior to animals. that animals don''''t know fear.. that they have no feelings. Whitney, however, believes that anilmals do know fear. Shortly after this conversation, Rainsford will learn.

    You can create printable tests and worksheets from these The Most Dangerous Game questions! Select one or more questions using the checkboxes above each question. Then click the add selected questions to a test button before moving to another page.

    The Most Dangerous Game opens with a conversation between two men, Whitney and Rainsford. The pair are on a yacht headed to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. At the time of the story, they find themselves somewhere in the Caribbean. Both men are aficionados of big-game hunting. They discuss the ability of an animal to understand a hunt. Rainsford believes that animals are incapable of feeling or understanding any human emotion.

    Shortly after their discussion, Whitney retires for the evening. Rainsford decides to stay on deck to smoke his pipe. He suddenly hears the sound of gunshots and in his attempt to see the source of the sound, he falls into the water. After a brief moment of panic, Rainsford rallies and decides to swim toward the source of the gunshots. When he finally makes it ashore, he falls asleep.

  6. author
    redfish353 18 Jan 2017 06:57

    You must remember that this is pure escape fiction. Thus the mood is pretty much straight forward. Assuming we care that Rainsford lives through this, the moods are exciting, fearful and ominous (that crazy Zaroff even lives in a gothic-castle)

    Rainsford is imparting his belief that humans are superior to animals. that animals don''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t know fear.. that they have no feelings. Whitney, however, believes that anilmals do know fear. Shortly after this conversation, Rainsford will learn.

    You can create printable tests and worksheets from these The Most Dangerous Game questions! Select one or more questions using the checkboxes above each question. Then click the add selected questions to a test button before moving to another page.

    The Most Dangerous Game opens with a conversation between two men, Whitney and Rainsford. The pair are on a yacht headed to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. At the time of the story, they find themselves somewhere in the Caribbean. Both men are aficionados of big-game hunting. They discuss the ability of an animal to understand a hunt. Rainsford believes that animals are incapable of feeling or understanding any human emotion.

    Shortly after their discussion, Whitney retires for the evening. Rainsford decides to stay on deck to smoke his pipe. He suddenly hears the sound of gunshots and in his attempt to see the source of the sound, he falls into the water. After a brief moment of panic, Rainsford rallies and decides to swim toward the source of the gunshots. When he finally makes it ashore, he falls asleep.

    The violence in “The Most Dangerous Game” is not just physical—it’s psychological. Connell sets up the dilemma from the get-go whether hunting is a brutal activity or an amusing sport. Deciding on one or the other depends a lot on how you feel about animals. "Don''''t talk rot, Whitney," said Rainsford. "You''''re a big-game hunter, not a philosopher. Who cares how a jaguar feels?" (1.10). Rainsford’s attitude suggests his willingness to commit violence without considering any of the ethical implications.

    We quickly forget about that position once we meet General Zaroff, who ups the ante on the lack-of-compassion scale. Although he knows that human beings have feelings, that doesn’t stop him from committing violence against them. But at least he gives them a choice: be whipped by Ivan (who used to offer his skill to none other than the czar himself) or grab your gear and hit the path. Thanks for the options, chief.

    Whitney then decides to turn in for the night, but Rainsford opts to smoke his pipe on the afterdeck for a while. Suddenly, he hears three gunshots in the distance and moves toward the railing of the deck to investigate. Hoisting himself onto the rail to try and get a better look, Rainsford drops his pipe, loses his balance in an attempt to catch it, and accidentally plunges into the water. His cries for help go unanswered, and the yacht quickly disappears into the night.

    Rainsford decides to swim in the gunshots’ direction. He hears the screeching sound of an animal in agony and heads straight for it, until the cries end abruptly with a pistol shot. Exhausted, Rainsford reaches the rocky shore and immediately falls into a deep sleep. He wakes the next afternoon and sets off in search of food, forced to skirt the thick growth of the jungle and walk along the shore. He soon comes to a bloody, torn-up patch of vegetation where a large animal had thrashed about. He finds an empty rifle cartridge nearby.

    How many of you are old enough to remember "We Didn't Start The Fire," that shit-awful Billy Joel song in which he unconvincingly insists over and over that he didn't cause the apocalypse?

    Well, what I am finding as time goes on is that we are all secretly Billy Joel. Write an article on the Internet about racism or sexism, and there's always this annoyed backlash. " I did not cause slavery ! I'm a white guy who works for minimum wage at Comcast, running the Random Call Disconnection machine! Would you please just move on so we can finally talk about something else?"

  7. author
    lazybutterfly293 18 Jan 2017 06:57

    If your teacher is looking for something a little deeper, you could say that since the story takes place in a futuristic Norh America, she believes that our country is headed in the direction of what the Hunger Games portrayes as our society in coming years.

  8. author
    Энн ✨ 18 Jan 2017 04:30

    there are lots of different question games, one of these is where you have to end every sentence in a question. for example it would be like: hey so i woke up this morning? and i brushed my hair? and so on and so on. hope this helps! answer mine? http://ca.answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20111003213323AAYgIf2&r=w thanks Angel

  9. author
    smallkoala600 18 Jan 2017 02:59

    You must remember that this is pure escape fiction. Thus the mood is pretty much straight forward. Assuming we care that Rainsford lives through this, the moods are exciting, fearful and ominous (that crazy Zaroff even lives in a gothic-castle)

    Rainsford is imparting his belief that humans are superior to animals. that animals don''t know fear.. that they have no feelings. Whitney, however, believes that anilmals do know fear. Shortly after this conversation, Rainsford will learn.

    You can create printable tests and worksheets from these The Most Dangerous Game questions! Select one or more questions using the checkboxes above each question. Then click the add selected questions to a test button before moving to another page.