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The Importance of Being Earnest

18 Jan 2017 21:24 | Author: ticklishwolf828 | Category: Resume references how many

Thesis Statement / Essay Topic #1 : The Importance of Being Earnest as a Morality Play Oscar Wilde lived and wrote during the Victorian era, a time characterized by.

Comments
  1. author
    User1491327533 18 Jan 2017 03:43

    All essays are weighted the same. The most you can get for one essay is 6. If you didn t write anything, you will get a 0. To get your score they use an conversion chart (it varies slightly for each test). The left side of the chart is numbered from 0 to 26 for the multiple choice section of the test. The top is numbered from 0 to 24 for the total of the essay scores. If you want to use an conversion chart to try to figure out a guesstimation of your score could be, you can find one at http://emsc32.nysed.gov/osa/concht/jan07/compenglish.htm. Hope this helps! I can respond if you have any more questions. **They have released the conversation charts. http://www.emsc.nysed.gov/osa/concht/08/jun08/compengcc-jun08.html The best you could get would be an 88.

  2. author
    crazymouse926 18 Jan 2017 09:07

    Earnest is also a satire because it makes fun of its characters – most of whom are members of the aristocratic class. Think about how proud Lady Bracknell is,. Read more

    If you''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''re anything like the seething hivemind here at Shmoop, you love British comedy. Blistering banter ? Bullet-quick repartee? Totally bizarre statements issued with poker faces? We can''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t get enough of that tea-and-crumpet-infused hilarity.

    And we''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''re not the only ones. Think of American comedy shows like Veep, The Office , or Shameless —all based on British shows.

    Jack tells Algernon what happened, and promises to kill off his brother Ernest later in the week. Algernon expresses interest in meeting Cecily, but Jack does not want this to happen, as she is young and pretty. Gwendolen returns. She tells Algernon to turn his back. She asks Jack his address in the country, and Algernon slyly writes this down and checks a train timetable. Gwendolen promises to write Jack daily when he returns to the countryside, and Jack escorts her out. Algernon informs Lane that he will be going Bunburying tomorrow.

    In the garden at Jack s country house, Miss Prism and Cecily discuss Jack s seemingly serious demeanor; Miss Prism believes it is due to his anxiety over his reckless brother. Dr. Chasuble enters the garden. He and Miss Prism leave for a walk together. Merriman , their butler, announces the arrival of Ernest Worthing. Algernon enters, pretending to be Ernest. He and Cecily briefly discuss his wicked reputation. When he learns that Jack will be back Monday afternoon, Algernon announces that he must leave Monday morning. He flirts with Cecily and they exit into the house.

  3. author
    User1488557751 18 Jan 2017 04:50

    Earnest is also a satire because it makes fun of its characters – most of whom are members of the aristocratic class. Think about how proud Lady Bracknell is,. Read more

    If you''''''''''''''''re anything like the seething hivemind here at Shmoop, you love British comedy. Blistering banter ? Bullet-quick repartee? Totally bizarre statements issued with poker faces? We can''''''''''''''''t get enough of that tea-and-crumpet-infused hilarity.

    And we''''''''''''''''re not the only ones. Think of American comedy shows like Veep, The Office , or Shameless —all based on British shows.

  4. author
    User1488098443 17 Jan 2017 23:56

    Earnest is also a satire because it makes fun of its characters – most of whom are members of the aristocratic class. Think about how proud Lady Bracknell is,. Read more

    If you''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''re anything like the seething hivemind here at Shmoop, you love British comedy. Blistering banter ? Bullet-quick repartee? Totally bizarre statements issued with poker faces? We can''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t get enough of that tea-and-crumpet-infused hilarity.

    And we''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''re not the only ones. Think of American comedy shows like Veep, The Office , or Shameless —all based on British shows.

    Jack tells Algernon what happened, and promises to kill off his brother Ernest later in the week. Algernon expresses interest in meeting Cecily, but Jack does not want this to happen, as she is young and pretty. Gwendolen returns. She tells Algernon to turn his back. She asks Jack his address in the country, and Algernon slyly writes this down and checks a train timetable. Gwendolen promises to write Jack daily when he returns to the countryside, and Jack escorts her out. Algernon informs Lane that he will be going Bunburying tomorrow.

    In the garden at Jack s country house, Miss Prism and Cecily discuss Jack s seemingly serious demeanor; Miss Prism believes it is due to his anxiety over his reckless brother. Dr. Chasuble enters the garden. He and Miss Prism leave for a walk together. Merriman , their butler, announces the arrival of Ernest Worthing. Algernon enters, pretending to be Ernest. He and Cecily briefly discuss his wicked reputation. When he learns that Jack will be back Monday afternoon, Algernon announces that he must leave Monday morning. He flirts with Cecily and they exit into the house.

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  5. author
    smallbutterfly689 18 Jan 2017 04:53

    Earnest is also a satire because it makes fun of its characters – most of whom are members of the aristocratic class. Think about how proud Lady Bracknell is,. Read more

    If you're anything like the seething hivemind here at Shmoop, you love British comedy. Blistering banter ? Bullet-quick repartee? Totally bizarre statements issued with poker faces? We can't get enough of that tea-and-crumpet-infused hilarity.

    And we're not the only ones. Think of American comedy shows like Veep, The Office , or Shameless —all based on British shows.

  6. author
    User1491370825 18 Jan 2017 06:22

    Earnest is also a satire because it makes fun of its characters – most of whom are members of the aristocratic class. Think about how proud Lady Bracknell is,. Read more

    If you''''''''re anything like the seething hivemind here at Shmoop, you love British comedy. Blistering banter ? Bullet-quick repartee? Totally bizarre statements issued with poker faces? We can''''''''t get enough of that tea-and-crumpet-infused hilarity.

    And we''''''''re not the only ones. Think of American comedy shows like Veep, The Office , or Shameless —all based on British shows.

  7. author
    yellowkoala338 18 Jan 2017 01:13

    I would say the essay section. write a brief outline and make sure to follow ALL the directions

  8. author
    Aigul Muratkhan 18 Jan 2017 05:37

    Earnest is also a satire because it makes fun of its characters – most of whom are members of the aristocratic class. Think about how proud Lady Bracknell is,. Read more

    If you''re anything like the seething hivemind here at Shmoop, you love British comedy. Blistering banter ? Bullet-quick repartee? Totally bizarre statements issued with poker faces? We can''t get enough of that tea-and-crumpet-infused hilarity.

    And we''re not the only ones. Think of American comedy shows like Veep, The Office , or Shameless —all based on British shows.

  9. author
    heavylion165 18 Jan 2017 06:54

    Earnest is also a satire because it makes fun of its characters – most of whom are members of the aristocratic class. Think about how proud Lady Bracknell is,. Read more

    If you''''re anything like the seething hivemind here at Shmoop, you love British comedy. Blistering banter ? Bullet-quick repartee? Totally bizarre statements issued with poker faces? We can''''t get enough of that tea-and-crumpet-infused hilarity.

    And we''''re not the only ones. Think of American comedy shows like Veep, The Office , or Shameless —all based on British shows.