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The Sunday Edition from CBC Radio (Highlights)

18 Jan 2017 21:24 | Author: redmeercat354 | Category: Global history dbq essay example

Probably one of the most frequently asked questions over the last two decades about family life has been, "Is divorce harmful to children?" Although this may seem.

Comments
  1. author
    tinywolf390 18 Jan 2017 09:21

    Parents in seperation and divorce are very concerned about the effects of divorce on children. They wonder whether their decision will affect the happiness and health of their child. Reliable information about the effects on children is still being gathered and analyzed by sociologists and psychologists.

    The divorce itself does not affect children in a negative way. The effects result more often from the feeling of uncertainty of what is going to happen after the divorce, from the level of conflict between the parents and from how the parenting after the divorce is done.

    Probably one of the most frequently asked questions over the last two decades about family life has been, Is divorce harmful to children? Although this may seem like a very important question, I would suggest that it is time to examine a more important question which is-- what are the factors in divorcing families that contribute to children having difficulties and what are the factors that foster children''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s adaptation? In this paper I will review several explanations for why children have difficulty and the scientific evidence regarding these factors.

    Despite this general finding across many studies, there are important qualifications of these findings. First, the actual differences between the two groups are relatively small (Amato, 2001; Amato & Keith, 1991). In fact, the children in the two types of families are more alike than different. Amato (1994) reminds us that average differences do not mean that all children in divorced families are worse off than all children in intact families. These results mean that as a group children from divorced families have more problems than children from intact families.

    In response to my blog about single parenting adolescents, I received this email request: "I was wondering if you could address the effects of divorce on very small children."

    What I can do is try to distinguish some general ways children (up through about age 8 or 9) often react to parental divorce in contrast to how adolescents (beginning around ages 9 - 13) often respond. Understand that I am talking here about tendencies, not certainties.

    Much has been published on Children Negative Effects of Divorce. Fortunately, most children of divorce do not experience long lasting negative effects.

    Divorce increases children s risk for a variety of problems. Experts are still unable to accurately predict which children are most vulnerable. Some things to consider:

    THE EFFECTS OF DIVORCE ON CHILDREN CPANCF.COM (352) 336-2888

    All Rights Reserved: Clinical Psychology Associates of North Central Florida Gainesville and Ocala, FL

    If you and your partner are thinking about getting a divorce it is important that the both of you are aware of the potential short-term and long-term effects your actions may have on your child:

    Generally, the effects of divorce on children are short term after which they fade once the child has had time to adjust to the new family situation and all the changes that have occurred. However, you should note that there are a small number of cases where the effects may be long term. The children of divorced parents may be more likely to:

    The manner in which parents resolve conflict has been determined to affect child adjustment. Chronic, unresolved conflict is associated with greater emotional insecurity in children. Fear, distress, and other symptoms in children are diminished when parents resolve their conflicts and when they use compromise and negotiation methods rather than verbal attacks. The beneficial effects of these more resolution-oriented behaviors have been reported whether or not they are directly observed by the child.

    Amato, P.R., & Keith, B. (1991). Parental divorce and adult well-being: A meta-analysis. Journal of Marriage and the Family , 53, 43-58.

  2. author
    User1489192500 18 Jan 2017 03:31

    Parents in seperation and divorce are very concerned about the effects of divorce on children. They wonder whether their decision will affect the happiness and health of their child. Reliable information about the effects on children is still being gathered and analyzed by sociologists and psychologists.

    The divorce itself does not affect children in a negative way. The effects result more often from the feeling of uncertainty of what is going to happen after the divorce, from the level of conflict between the parents and from how the parenting after the divorce is done.

    Probably one of the most frequently asked questions over the last two decades about family life has been, Is divorce harmful to children? Although this may seem like a very important question, I would suggest that it is time to examine a more important question which is-- what are the factors in divorcing families that contribute to children having difficulties and what are the factors that foster children's adaptation? In this paper I will review several explanations for why children have difficulty and the scientific evidence regarding these factors.

    Despite this general finding across many studies, there are important qualifications of these findings. First, the actual differences between the two groups are relatively small (Amato, 2001; Amato & Keith, 1991). In fact, the children in the two types of families are more alike than different. Amato (1994) reminds us that average differences do not mean that all children in divorced families are worse off than all children in intact families. These results mean that as a group children from divorced families have more problems than children from intact families.

  3. author
    brownpanda747 18 Jan 2017 05:00

    Parents in seperation and divorce are very concerned about the effects of divorce on children. They wonder whether their decision will affect the happiness and health of their child. Reliable information about the effects on children is still being gathered and analyzed by sociologists and psychologists.

    The divorce itself does not affect children in a negative way. The effects result more often from the feeling of uncertainty of what is going to happen after the divorce, from the level of conflict between the parents and from how the parenting after the divorce is done.

    Probably one of the most frequently asked questions over the last two decades about family life has been, Is divorce harmful to children? Although this may seem like a very important question, I would suggest that it is time to examine a more important question which is-- what are the factors in divorcing families that contribute to children having difficulties and what are the factors that foster children''''''''s adaptation? In this paper I will review several explanations for why children have difficulty and the scientific evidence regarding these factors.

    Despite this general finding across many studies, there are important qualifications of these findings. First, the actual differences between the two groups are relatively small (Amato, 2001; Amato & Keith, 1991). In fact, the children in the two types of families are more alike than different. Amato (1994) reminds us that average differences do not mean that all children in divorced families are worse off than all children in intact families. These results mean that as a group children from divorced families have more problems than children from intact families.

    In response to my blog about single parenting adolescents, I received this email request: "I was wondering if you could address the effects of divorce on very small children."

    What I can do is try to distinguish some general ways children (up through about age 8 or 9) often react to parental divorce in contrast to how adolescents (beginning around ages 9 - 13) often respond. Understand that I am talking here about tendencies, not certainties.

    Much has been published on Children Negative Effects of Divorce. Fortunately, most children of divorce do not experience long lasting negative effects.

    Divorce increases children s risk for a variety of problems. Experts are still unable to accurately predict which children are most vulnerable. Some things to consider:

    THE EFFECTS OF DIVORCE ON CHILDREN CPANCF.COM (352) 336-2888

    All Rights Reserved: Clinical Psychology Associates of North Central Florida Gainesville and Ocala, FL

  4. author
    User1489055025 17 Jan 2017 22:55

    Parents in seperation and divorce are very concerned about the effects of divorce on children. They wonder whether their decision will affect the happiness and health of their child. Reliable information about the effects on children is still being gathered and analyzed by sociologists and psychologists.

    The divorce itself does not affect children in a negative way. The effects result more often from the feeling of uncertainty of what is going to happen after the divorce, from the level of conflict between the parents and from how the parenting after the divorce is done.

    Probably one of the most frequently asked questions over the last two decades about family life has been, Is divorce harmful to children? Although this may seem like a very important question, I would suggest that it is time to examine a more important question which is-- what are the factors in divorcing families that contribute to children having difficulties and what are the factors that foster children''''''''''''''''s adaptation? In this paper I will review several explanations for why children have difficulty and the scientific evidence regarding these factors.

    Despite this general finding across many studies, there are important qualifications of these findings. First, the actual differences between the two groups are relatively small (Amato, 2001; Amato & Keith, 1991). In fact, the children in the two types of families are more alike than different. Amato (1994) reminds us that average differences do not mean that all children in divorced families are worse off than all children in intact families. These results mean that as a group children from divorced families have more problems than children from intact families.

    In response to my blog about single parenting adolescents, I received this email request: "I was wondering if you could address the effects of divorce on very small children."

    What I can do is try to distinguish some general ways children (up through about age 8 or 9) often react to parental divorce in contrast to how adolescents (beginning around ages 9 - 13) often respond. Understand that I am talking here about tendencies, not certainties.

    Much has been published on Children Negative Effects of Divorce. Fortunately, most children of divorce do not experience long lasting negative effects.

    Divorce increases children s risk for a variety of problems. Experts are still unable to accurately predict which children are most vulnerable. Some things to consider:

    THE EFFECTS OF DIVORCE ON CHILDREN CPANCF.COM (352) 336-2888

    All Rights Reserved: Clinical Psychology Associates of North Central Florida Gainesville and Ocala, FL

    If you and your partner are thinking about getting a divorce it is important that the both of you are aware of the potential short-term and long-term effects your actions may have on your child:

    Generally, the effects of divorce on children are short term after which they fade once the child has had time to adjust to the new family situation and all the changes that have occurred. However, you should note that there are a small number of cases where the effects may be long term. The children of divorced parents may be more likely to:

  5. author
    orangefrog737 18 Jan 2017 00:00

    1The Effects of Divorce on Children Patrick F. Fagan and Aaron Churchill January 11, 2012 Introduction Each year, over a million American children suffer the divorce.

  6. author
    silverswan552 18 Jan 2017 03:47

    Parents in seperation and divorce are very concerned about the effects of divorce on children. They wonder whether their decision will affect the happiness and health of their child. Reliable information about the effects on children is still being gathered and analyzed by sociologists and psychologists.

    The divorce itself does not affect children in a negative way. The effects result more often from the feeling of uncertainty of what is going to happen after the divorce, from the level of conflict between the parents and from how the parenting after the divorce is done.

  7. author
    User1489459784 17 Jan 2017 23:50

    Parents in seperation and divorce are very concerned about the effects of divorce on children. They wonder whether their decision will affect the happiness and health of their child. Reliable information about the effects on children is still being gathered and analyzed by sociologists and psychologists.

    The divorce itself does not affect children in a negative way. The effects result more often from the feeling of uncertainty of what is going to happen after the divorce, from the level of conflict between the parents and from how the parenting after the divorce is done.

    Probably one of the most frequently asked questions over the last two decades about family life has been, Is divorce harmful to children? Although this may seem like a very important question, I would suggest that it is time to examine a more important question which is-- what are the factors in divorcing families that contribute to children having difficulties and what are the factors that foster children''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s adaptation? In this paper I will review several explanations for why children have difficulty and the scientific evidence regarding these factors.

    Despite this general finding across many studies, there are important qualifications of these findings. First, the actual differences between the two groups are relatively small (Amato, 2001; Amato & Keith, 1991). In fact, the children in the two types of families are more alike than different. Amato (1994) reminds us that average differences do not mean that all children in divorced families are worse off than all children in intact families. These results mean that as a group children from divorced families have more problems than children from intact families.

    In response to my blog about single parenting adolescents, I received this email request: "I was wondering if you could address the effects of divorce on very small children."

    What I can do is try to distinguish some general ways children (up through about age 8 or 9) often react to parental divorce in contrast to how adolescents (beginning around ages 9 - 13) often respond. Understand that I am talking here about tendencies, not certainties.

    Much has been published on Children Negative Effects of Divorce. Fortunately, most children of divorce do not experience long lasting negative effects.

    Divorce increases children s risk for a variety of problems. Experts are still unable to accurately predict which children are most vulnerable. Some things to consider:

    THE EFFECTS OF DIVORCE ON CHILDREN CPANCF.COM (352) 336-2888

    All Rights Reserved: Clinical Psychology Associates of North Central Florida Gainesville and Ocala, FL

    If you and your partner are thinking about getting a divorce it is important that the both of you are aware of the potential short-term and long-term effects your actions may have on your child:

    Generally, the effects of divorce on children are short term after which they fade once the child has had time to adjust to the new family situation and all the changes that have occurred. However, you should note that there are a small number of cases where the effects may be long term. The children of divorced parents may be more likely to:

    The manner in which parents resolve conflict has been determined to affect child adjustment. Chronic, unresolved conflict is associated with greater emotional insecurity in children. Fear, distress, and other symptoms in children are diminished when parents resolve their conflicts and when they use compromise and negotiation methods rather than verbal attacks. The beneficial effects of these more resolution-oriented behaviors have been reported whether or not they are directly observed by the child.

    Amato, P.R., & Keith, B. (1991). Parental divorce and adult well-being: A meta-analysis. Journal of Marriage and the Family , 53, 43-58.

    Divorce is hardly an exception anymore. In fact, with the rate of marriage steadily dipping  over the past decade, and the divorce rate holding steady, you are likely to know more previously married couples than those who are legally bound. Accompanying this trend are multiple studies analyzing the effects that divorce has on children. And the results aren''t good, even if the stigma of divorce has faded. Here, 9 negative effects divorce reportedly has on children:

    1. Smoking habits
    In a study published in the March 2013 edition of Public Health , researchers at the University of Toronto found that both sons and daughters of divorced families are significantly more likely to begin smoking than peers whose parents are married. In an analysis of 19,000 Americans , men whose parents divorced before they turned 18 had 48 percent higher odds of smoking than men with intact families. Women had 39 percent higher odds of picking up the habit. Lead author Esme Fuller-Thomson called the link " very disturbing."

    This book is a summary of a decade long longitude study of 60 families with 131 children from the periods of 1971 to 1981 on the effects of divorce.  The couples, as well as the children, were studied during a six-week period near the time when one of the parents left permanently from the house.  At 18 months, 5 years, and 10 years, a reexamination interview was performed to record the effects post-separation. While the book was being written, many of the adults and children had already been reexamined for a 15 year interview. [i]

    (Note: This list is a result of direct quotes and paraphrasing. I did not use quotation marks, but the reader should assume the content is Judith’s. Also all these facts took place within the 10-year mark unless otherwise noted)

  8. author
    Кадастр05 18 Jan 2017 05:22

    Parents in seperation and divorce are very concerned about the effects of divorce on children. They wonder whether their decision will affect the happiness and health of their child. Reliable information about the effects on children is still being gathered and analyzed by sociologists and psychologists.

    The divorce itself does not affect children in a negative way. The effects result more often from the feeling of uncertainty of what is going to happen after the divorce, from the level of conflict between the parents and from how the parenting after the divorce is done.

    Probably one of the most frequently asked questions over the last two decades about family life has been, Is divorce harmful to children? Although this may seem like a very important question, I would suggest that it is time to examine a more important question which is-- what are the factors in divorcing families that contribute to children having difficulties and what are the factors that foster children''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s adaptation? In this paper I will review several explanations for why children have difficulty and the scientific evidence regarding these factors.

    Despite this general finding across many studies, there are important qualifications of these findings. First, the actual differences between the two groups are relatively small (Amato, 2001; Amato & Keith, 1991). In fact, the children in the two types of families are more alike than different. Amato (1994) reminds us that average differences do not mean that all children in divorced families are worse off than all children in intact families. These results mean that as a group children from divorced families have more problems than children from intact families.

    In response to my blog about single parenting adolescents, I received this email request: "I was wondering if you could address the effects of divorce on very small children."

    What I can do is try to distinguish some general ways children (up through about age 8 or 9) often react to parental divorce in contrast to how adolescents (beginning around ages 9 - 13) often respond. Understand that I am talking here about tendencies, not certainties.

    Much has been published on Children Negative Effects of Divorce. Fortunately, most children of divorce do not experience long lasting negative effects.

    Divorce increases children s risk for a variety of problems. Experts are still unable to accurately predict which children are most vulnerable. Some things to consider:

    THE EFFECTS OF DIVORCE ON CHILDREN CPANCF.COM (352) 336-2888

    All Rights Reserved: Clinical Psychology Associates of North Central Florida Gainesville and Ocala, FL

    If you and your partner are thinking about getting a divorce it is important that the both of you are aware of the potential short-term and long-term effects your actions may have on your child:

    Generally, the effects of divorce on children are short term after which they fade once the child has had time to adjust to the new family situation and all the changes that have occurred. However, you should note that there are a small number of cases where the effects may be long term. The children of divorced parents may be more likely to:

    The manner in which parents resolve conflict has been determined to affect child adjustment. Chronic, unresolved conflict is associated with greater emotional insecurity in children. Fear, distress, and other symptoms in children are diminished when parents resolve their conflicts and when they use compromise and negotiation methods rather than verbal attacks. The beneficial effects of these more resolution-oriented behaviors have been reported whether or not they are directly observed by the child.

    Amato, P.R., & Keith, B. (1991). Parental divorce and adult well-being: A meta-analysis. Journal of Marriage and the Family , 53, 43-58.

    Divorce is hardly an exception anymore. In fact, with the rate of marriage steadily dipping  over the past decade, and the divorce rate holding steady, you are likely to know more previously married couples than those who are legally bound. Accompanying this trend are multiple studies analyzing the effects that divorce has on children. And the results aren't good, even if the stigma of divorce has faded. Here, 9 negative effects divorce reportedly has on children:

    1. Smoking habits
    In a study published in the March 2013 edition of Public Health , researchers at the University of Toronto found that both sons and daughters of divorced families are significantly more likely to begin smoking than peers whose parents are married. In an analysis of 19,000 Americans , men whose parents divorced before they turned 18 had 48 percent higher odds of smoking than men with intact families. Women had 39 percent higher odds of picking up the habit. Lead author Esme Fuller-Thomson called the link " very disturbing."

  9. author
    User1489784745 17 Jan 2017 22:46

    It has too much

  10. author
    User1489972834 17 Jan 2017 23:10

    Parents in seperation and divorce are very concerned about the effects of divorce on children. They wonder whether their decision will affect the happiness and health of their child. Reliable information about the effects on children is still being gathered and analyzed by sociologists and psychologists.

    The divorce itself does not affect children in a negative way. The effects result more often from the feeling of uncertainty of what is going to happen after the divorce, from the level of conflict between the parents and from how the parenting after the divorce is done.

    Probably one of the most frequently asked questions over the last two decades about family life has been, Is divorce harmful to children? Although this may seem like a very important question, I would suggest that it is time to examine a more important question which is-- what are the factors in divorcing families that contribute to children having difficulties and what are the factors that foster children''''s adaptation? In this paper I will review several explanations for why children have difficulty and the scientific evidence regarding these factors.

    Despite this general finding across many studies, there are important qualifications of these findings. First, the actual differences between the two groups are relatively small (Amato, 2001; Amato & Keith, 1991). In fact, the children in the two types of families are more alike than different. Amato (1994) reminds us that average differences do not mean that all children in divorced families are worse off than all children in intact families. These results mean that as a group children from divorced families have more problems than children from intact families.

    In response to my blog about single parenting adolescents, I received this email request: "I was wondering if you could address the effects of divorce on very small children."

    What I can do is try to distinguish some general ways children (up through about age 8 or 9) often react to parental divorce in contrast to how adolescents (beginning around ages 9 - 13) often respond. Understand that I am talking here about tendencies, not certainties.

    Much has been published on Children Negative Effects of Divorce. Fortunately, most children of divorce do not experience long lasting negative effects.

    Divorce increases children s risk for a variety of problems. Experts are still unable to accurately predict which children are most vulnerable. Some things to consider:

  11. author
    bigdog384 18 Jan 2017 06:41

    Parents in seperation and divorce are very concerned about the effects of divorce on children. They wonder whether their decision will affect the happiness and health of their child. Reliable information about the effects on children is still being gathered and analyzed by sociologists and psychologists.

    The divorce itself does not affect children in a negative way. The effects result more often from the feeling of uncertainty of what is going to happen after the divorce, from the level of conflict between the parents and from how the parenting after the divorce is done.

    Probably one of the most frequently asked questions over the last two decades about family life has been, Is divorce harmful to children? Although this may seem like a very important question, I would suggest that it is time to examine a more important question which is-- what are the factors in divorcing families that contribute to children having difficulties and what are the factors that foster children''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s adaptation? In this paper I will review several explanations for why children have difficulty and the scientific evidence regarding these factors.

    Despite this general finding across many studies, there are important qualifications of these findings. First, the actual differences between the two groups are relatively small (Amato, 2001; Amato & Keith, 1991). In fact, the children in the two types of families are more alike than different. Amato (1994) reminds us that average differences do not mean that all children in divorced families are worse off than all children in intact families. These results mean that as a group children from divorced families have more problems than children from intact families.

    In response to my blog about single parenting adolescents, I received this email request: "I was wondering if you could address the effects of divorce on very small children."

    What I can do is try to distinguish some general ways children (up through about age 8 or 9) often react to parental divorce in contrast to how adolescents (beginning around ages 9 - 13) often respond. Understand that I am talking here about tendencies, not certainties.

    Much has been published on Children Negative Effects of Divorce. Fortunately, most children of divorce do not experience long lasting negative effects.

    Divorce increases children s risk for a variety of problems. Experts are still unable to accurately predict which children are most vulnerable. Some things to consider:

    THE EFFECTS OF DIVORCE ON CHILDREN CPANCF.COM (352) 336-2888

    All Rights Reserved: Clinical Psychology Associates of North Central Florida Gainesville and Ocala, FL

    If you and your partner are thinking about getting a divorce it is important that the both of you are aware of the potential short-term and long-term effects your actions may have on your child:

    Generally, the effects of divorce on children are short term after which they fade once the child has had time to adjust to the new family situation and all the changes that have occurred. However, you should note that there are a small number of cases where the effects may be long term. The children of divorced parents may be more likely to:

    The manner in which parents resolve conflict has been determined to affect child adjustment. Chronic, unresolved conflict is associated with greater emotional insecurity in children. Fear, distress, and other symptoms in children are diminished when parents resolve their conflicts and when they use compromise and negotiation methods rather than verbal attacks. The beneficial effects of these more resolution-oriented behaviors have been reported whether or not they are directly observed by the child.

    Amato, P.R., & Keith, B. (1991). Parental divorce and adult well-being: A meta-analysis. Journal of Marriage and the Family , 53, 43-58.

  12. author
    browngorilla375 18 Jan 2017 01:37

    Masturbation and the sensations felt alongside it is different to every person. The main "side effects" of masturbation is that you are unable to ejaculate or maintain an erection for a few hours after. Some guys say it is painful to continue to masturbate immediately after blowing their load. It also makes some, including myself, feel extremely tired after finishing up. I don t believe that there s any "serious side effect". Another thing is is that there s a muscle in your arm which will become bigger, and when tensed in a certain way it ll become obvious to others. But hey, there s no shame in hiding it - all guys do it.

  13. author
    User1488641216 17 Jan 2017 22:26

    Desensitizing of children happens when showed gruesome or violent things at a young age.

  14. author
    yellowlion992 18 Jan 2017 08:52

    Parents in seperation and divorce are very concerned about the effects of divorce on children. They wonder whether their decision will affect the happiness and health of their child. Reliable information about the effects on children is still being gathered and analyzed by sociologists and psychologists.

    The divorce itself does not affect children in a negative way. The effects result more often from the feeling of uncertainty of what is going to happen after the divorce, from the level of conflict between the parents and from how the parenting after the divorce is done.

    Probably one of the most frequently asked questions over the last two decades about family life has been, Is divorce harmful to children? Although this may seem like a very important question, I would suggest that it is time to examine a more important question which is-- what are the factors in divorcing families that contribute to children having difficulties and what are the factors that foster children''s adaptation? In this paper I will review several explanations for why children have difficulty and the scientific evidence regarding these factors.

    Despite this general finding across many studies, there are important qualifications of these findings. First, the actual differences between the two groups are relatively small (Amato, 2001; Amato & Keith, 1991). In fact, the children in the two types of families are more alike than different. Amato (1994) reminds us that average differences do not mean that all children in divorced families are worse off than all children in intact families. These results mean that as a group children from divorced families have more problems than children from intact families.

    In response to my blog about single parenting adolescents, I received this email request: "I was wondering if you could address the effects of divorce on very small children."

    What I can do is try to distinguish some general ways children (up through about age 8 or 9) often react to parental divorce in contrast to how adolescents (beginning around ages 9 - 13) often respond. Understand that I am talking here about tendencies, not certainties.