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18 Jan 2017 21:24 | Author: lazycat427 | Category: Latin american revolution essay

Get the most out of your book club discussion with these reading questions and topics for Oprah's Book Club selection A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens.

Comments
  1. author
    User1492122774 18 Jan 2017 07:08

    A Tale of Two Cities (1859) is a novel by Charles Dickens , set in London and Paris before and during the French Revolution. The novel depicts the plight of the French peasantry demoralized by the French aristocracy in the years leading up to the revolution, the corresponding brutality demonstrated by the revolutionaries toward the former aristocrats in the early years of the revolution, and many unflattering social parallels with life in London during the same period.

    Dickens''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s famous opening sentence introduces the universal approach of the book, the French Revolution, and the drama depicted within:

    The paragraph about the theme that sacrifice is necessary is written like the writer believes the violence of the French Revolution (like the guillotine) was necessary, but to me it seemed like Dickens was clearly condemning the violence, if not the revolution itself. It also uses what Mrs. Defarge said to her husband, but she''''s a villain in the story, and I don''''t think we should be taking her word for it.

    Miss Pross and Jerry Cruncher continue shopping, unaware that Darnay has been arrested again. They coincidentally enter the Defarges shop looking to purchase wine. Miss Pross sees a man in the shop and screams, because she recognizes him as her brother, Solomon Pross, who is now an officer of the French Republic. Jerry Cruncher is equally shocked because he recognizes the man as John Barsad, the English spy. He is trying to think of this name aloud, when Sydney Carton passes by and supplies the name for him.

    Carton leaves the house and goes to look at La Force Prison. The wood-sawyer speaks to him, recommending that he see people being guillotined if he has never seen it before. Carton resists the desire to hit him, and instead finds his way to a chemist s shop where he orders some drugs. He recalls a prayer that he learned when he was younger, and he stops to help a child across the muddy street. All night he walks the streets, and without having slept he attends the trial in the morning.

  2. author
    yellowladybug974 17 Jan 2017 22:07

    A Tale of Two Cities (1859) is a novel by Charles Dickens , set in London and Paris before and during the French Revolution. The novel depicts the plight of the French peasantry demoralized by the French aristocracy in the years leading up to the revolution, the corresponding brutality demonstrated by the revolutionaries toward the former aristocrats in the early years of the revolution, and many unflattering social parallels with life in London during the same period.

    Dickens''''''''s famous opening sentence introduces the universal approach of the book, the French Revolution, and the drama depicted within:

    The paragraph about the theme that sacrifice is necessary is written like the writer believes the violence of the French Revolution (like the guillotine) was necessary, but to me it seemed like Dickens was clearly condemning the violence, if not the revolution itself. It also uses what Mrs. Defarge said to her husband, but she's a villain in the story, and I don't think we should be taking her word for it.

  3. author
    redwolf575 17 Jan 2017 22:24

    A Tale of Two Cities (1859) is a novel by Charles Dickens , set in London and Paris before and during the French Revolution. The novel depicts the plight of the French peasantry demoralized by the French aristocracy in the years leading up to the revolution, the corresponding brutality demonstrated by the revolutionaries toward the former aristocrats in the early years of the revolution, and many unflattering social parallels with life in London during the same period.

    Dickens''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s famous opening sentence introduces the universal approach of the book, the French Revolution, and the drama depicted within:

    The paragraph about the theme that sacrifice is necessary is written like the writer believes the violence of the French Revolution (like the guillotine) was necessary, but to me it seemed like Dickens was clearly condemning the violence, if not the revolution itself. It also uses what Mrs. Defarge said to her husband, but she''''''''''''''''s a villain in the story, and I don''''''''''''''''t think we should be taking her word for it.

    Miss Pross and Jerry Cruncher continue shopping, unaware that Darnay has been arrested again. They coincidentally enter the Defarges shop looking to purchase wine. Miss Pross sees a man in the shop and screams, because she recognizes him as her brother, Solomon Pross, who is now an officer of the French Republic. Jerry Cruncher is equally shocked because he recognizes the man as John Barsad, the English spy. He is trying to think of this name aloud, when Sydney Carton passes by and supplies the name for him.

    Carton leaves the house and goes to look at La Force Prison. The wood-sawyer speaks to him, recommending that he see people being guillotined if he has never seen it before. Carton resists the desire to hit him, and instead finds his way to a chemist s shop where he orders some drugs. He recalls a prayer that he learned when he was younger, and he stops to help a child across the muddy street. All night he walks the streets, and without having slept he attends the trial in the morning.

    As the chapter begins, before the narrator returns to the events of the plot, he reflects upon the strangeness at the heart of human relationships. The narrator clarifies this thought by asking the reader to imagine a concrete circumstance, wandering through a "great city" at night. A city is perhaps particularly suited to the narrator's exploration of secrecy, given that it joins thousands or millions of people together in a relatively confined space, and yet these people often don't know each other and don't interact with each other.

    However, the narrator is also interested in a slightly different problem – that is, even the people we think we know remain secret to us. Much of this novel will be taken up with characters' secrets, the degree to which fellow characters remain ignorant of those secrets (sometimes tragically so), and the contrast between characters who think they know other people and what they actually know about those people.

  4. author
    Egyptian orchestra 18 Jan 2017 05:01

    A Tale of Two Cities (1859) is a novel by Charles Dickens , set in London and Paris before and during the French Revolution. The novel depicts the plight of the French peasantry demoralized by the French aristocracy in the years leading up to the revolution, the corresponding brutality demonstrated by the revolutionaries toward the former aristocrats in the early years of the revolution, and many unflattering social parallels with life in London during the same period.

    Dickens''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s famous opening sentence introduces the universal approach of the book, the French Revolution, and the drama depicted within:

    The paragraph about the theme that sacrifice is necessary is written like the writer believes the violence of the French Revolution (like the guillotine) was necessary, but to me it seemed like Dickens was clearly condemning the violence, if not the revolution itself. It also uses what Mrs. Defarge said to her husband, but she''''''''s a villain in the story, and I don''''''''t think we should be taking her word for it.

    Miss Pross and Jerry Cruncher continue shopping, unaware that Darnay has been arrested again. They coincidentally enter the Defarges shop looking to purchase wine. Miss Pross sees a man in the shop and screams, because she recognizes him as her brother, Solomon Pross, who is now an officer of the French Republic. Jerry Cruncher is equally shocked because he recognizes the man as John Barsad, the English spy. He is trying to think of this name aloud, when Sydney Carton passes by and supplies the name for him.

    Carton leaves the house and goes to look at La Force Prison. The wood-sawyer speaks to him, recommending that he see people being guillotined if he has never seen it before. Carton resists the desire to hit him, and instead finds his way to a chemist s shop where he orders some drugs. He recalls a prayer that he learned when he was younger, and he stops to help a child across the muddy street. All night he walks the streets, and without having slept he attends the trial in the morning.

  5. author
    lazyfish171 17 Jan 2017 22:54

    What universal desire for fairness? Did you read this book? There was no fairness. Handmaids are solely used for their ability to carry children. If they are inable, then they become Unwomen or Jezebels. There is no way to know that she loves Luke less. It is a disjointed narrative. As a reader, you do not know the time order of the story. If you read the historical notes at the end, they are a critical piece to understanding this concept. It could even be argued that Nick is a replacement for Luke in her mind. I do not know that she loves him less when her rights are taken away. He is never a part of the story when she is a Handmaid outside of the fact that she looks for him on the wall. He does not possess an active role. I am not really sure where you came up with this question. I am assuming it is homework (just a guess). However, if it is based upon your interpretation of the text, I suggest revisiting it and taking a deeper look at it.

  6. author
    User1488960035 18 Jan 2017 06:13

    A Tale of Two Cities (1859) is a novel by Charles Dickens , set in London and Paris before and during the French Revolution. The novel depicts the plight of the French peasantry demoralized by the French aristocracy in the years leading up to the revolution, the corresponding brutality demonstrated by the revolutionaries toward the former aristocrats in the early years of the revolution, and many unflattering social parallels with life in London during the same period.

    Dickens''''''''''''''''s famous opening sentence introduces the universal approach of the book, the French Revolution, and the drama depicted within:

    The paragraph about the theme that sacrifice is necessary is written like the writer believes the violence of the French Revolution (like the guillotine) was necessary, but to me it seemed like Dickens was clearly condemning the violence, if not the revolution itself. It also uses what Mrs. Defarge said to her husband, but she''s a villain in the story, and I don''t think we should be taking her word for it.

    Miss Pross and Jerry Cruncher continue shopping, unaware that Darnay has been arrested again. They coincidentally enter the Defarges shop looking to purchase wine. Miss Pross sees a man in the shop and screams, because she recognizes him as her brother, Solomon Pross, who is now an officer of the French Republic. Jerry Cruncher is equally shocked because he recognizes the man as John Barsad, the English spy. He is trying to think of this name aloud, when Sydney Carton passes by and supplies the name for him.

    Carton leaves the house and goes to look at La Force Prison. The wood-sawyer speaks to him, recommending that he see people being guillotined if he has never seen it before. Carton resists the desire to hit him, and instead finds his way to a chemist s shop where he orders some drugs. He recalls a prayer that he learned when he was younger, and he stops to help a child across the muddy street. All night he walks the streets, and without having slept he attends the trial in the morning.

  7. author
    redbird515 18 Jan 2017 00:12

    Order paper here the book a tale of two cities

    Get the most out of your book club discussion with these reading questions and topics for Oprah''s Book Club selection A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens.

  8. author
    User1492113076 17 Jan 2017 22:49

    A Tale of Two Cities (1859) is a novel by Charles Dickens , set in London and Paris before and during the French Revolution. The novel depicts the plight of the French peasantry demoralized by the French aristocracy in the years leading up to the revolution, the corresponding brutality demonstrated by the revolutionaries toward the former aristocrats in the early years of the revolution, and many unflattering social parallels with life in London during the same period.

    Dickens''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s famous opening sentence introduces the universal approach of the book, the French Revolution, and the drama depicted within:

    The paragraph about the theme that sacrifice is necessary is written like the writer believes the violence of the French Revolution (like the guillotine) was necessary, but to me it seemed like Dickens was clearly condemning the violence, if not the revolution itself. It also uses what Mrs. Defarge said to her husband, but she''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s a villain in the story, and I don''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t think we should be taking her word for it.

    Miss Pross and Jerry Cruncher continue shopping, unaware that Darnay has been arrested again. They coincidentally enter the Defarges shop looking to purchase wine. Miss Pross sees a man in the shop and screams, because she recognizes him as her brother, Solomon Pross, who is now an officer of the French Republic. Jerry Cruncher is equally shocked because he recognizes the man as John Barsad, the English spy. He is trying to think of this name aloud, when Sydney Carton passes by and supplies the name for him.

    Carton leaves the house and goes to look at La Force Prison. The wood-sawyer speaks to him, recommending that he see people being guillotined if he has never seen it before. Carton resists the desire to hit him, and instead finds his way to a chemist s shop where he orders some drugs. He recalls a prayer that he learned when he was younger, and he stops to help a child across the muddy street. All night he walks the streets, and without having slept he attends the trial in the morning.

    As the chapter begins, before the narrator returns to the events of the plot, he reflects upon the strangeness at the heart of human relationships. The narrator clarifies this thought by asking the reader to imagine a concrete circumstance, wandering through a "great city" at night. A city is perhaps particularly suited to the narrator''s exploration of secrecy, given that it joins thousands or millions of people together in a relatively confined space, and yet these people often don''t know each other and don''t interact with each other.

    However, the narrator is also interested in a slightly different problem – that is, even the people we think we know remain secret to us. Much of this novel will be taken up with characters'' secrets, the degree to which fellow characters remain ignorant of those secrets (sometimes tragically so), and the contrast between characters who think they know other people and what they actually know about those people.

    As you were browsing something about your browser made us think you were a bot. There are a few reasons this might happen:

  9. author
    crazybear436 17 Jan 2017 22:16

    This is from sparknotes With A Tale of Two Cities, Dickens asserts his belief in the possibility of resurrection and transformation, both on a personal level and on a societal level. The narrative suggests that Sydney Carton s death secures a new, peaceful life for Lucie Manette, Charles Darnay, and even Carton himself. By delivering himself to the guillotine, Carton ascends to the plane of heroism, becoming a Christ-like figure whose death serves to save the lives of others. His own life thus gains meaning and value. Moreover, the final pages of the novel suggest that, like Christ, Carton will be resurrected—Carton is reborn in the hearts of those he has died to save. *****Similarly, the text implies that the death of the old regime in France prepares the way for the beautiful and renewed Paris that Carton supposedly envisions from the guillotine. Although Carton spends most of the novel in a life of indolence and apathy, the supreme selflessness of his final act speaks to a human capacity for change. Although the novel dedicates much time to describing the atrocities committed both by the aristocracy and by the outraged peasants, it ultimately expresses the belief that this violence will give way to a new and better society.***** Dickens elaborates his theme with the character of Doctor Manette. Early on in the novel, Lorry holds an imaginary conversation with him in which he says that Manette has been “recalled to life.” As this statement implies, the doctor s eighteen-year imprisonment has constituted a death of sorts. Lucie s love enables Manette s spiritual renewal, and her maternal cradling of him on her breast reinforces this notion of rebirth. Think about what life was like for peasants and aristocrats before, then after, the Revolution.

  10. author
    tinyfrog558 17 Jan 2017 23:50

    if its a book report then just go to the library get a cliff notes book about A tale of two cities, it tells u everything u would need to know trust me i read it and got a 96 on the report

  11. author
    User1488460818 18 Jan 2017 00:23

    A Tale of Two Cities (1859) is a novel by Charles Dickens , set in London and Paris before and during the French Revolution. The novel depicts the plight of the French peasantry demoralized by the French aristocracy in the years leading up to the revolution, the corresponding brutality demonstrated by the revolutionaries toward the former aristocrats in the early years of the revolution, and many unflattering social parallels with life in London during the same period.

    Dickens''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s famous opening sentence introduces the universal approach of the book, the French Revolution, and the drama depicted within:

    The paragraph about the theme that sacrifice is necessary is written like the writer believes the violence of the French Revolution (like the guillotine) was necessary, but to me it seemed like Dickens was clearly condemning the violence, if not the revolution itself. It also uses what Mrs. Defarge said to her husband, but she''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s a villain in the story, and I don''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t think we should be taking her word for it.

    Miss Pross and Jerry Cruncher continue shopping, unaware that Darnay has been arrested again. They coincidentally enter the Defarges shop looking to purchase wine. Miss Pross sees a man in the shop and screams, because she recognizes him as her brother, Solomon Pross, who is now an officer of the French Republic. Jerry Cruncher is equally shocked because he recognizes the man as John Barsad, the English spy. He is trying to think of this name aloud, when Sydney Carton passes by and supplies the name for him.

    Carton leaves the house and goes to look at La Force Prison. The wood-sawyer speaks to him, recommending that he see people being guillotined if he has never seen it before. Carton resists the desire to hit him, and instead finds his way to a chemist s shop where he orders some drugs. He recalls a prayer that he learned when he was younger, and he stops to help a child across the muddy street. All night he walks the streets, and without having slept he attends the trial in the morning.

    As the chapter begins, before the narrator returns to the events of the plot, he reflects upon the strangeness at the heart of human relationships. The narrator clarifies this thought by asking the reader to imagine a concrete circumstance, wandering through a "great city" at night. A city is perhaps particularly suited to the narrator''''s exploration of secrecy, given that it joins thousands or millions of people together in a relatively confined space, and yet these people often don''''t know each other and don''''t interact with each other.

    However, the narrator is also interested in a slightly different problem – that is, even the people we think we know remain secret to us. Much of this novel will be taken up with characters'''' secrets, the degree to which fellow characters remain ignorant of those secrets (sometimes tragically so), and the contrast between characters who think they know other people and what they actually know about those people.

    As you were browsing something about your browser made us think you were a bot. There are a few reasons this might happen: