12

A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens - Loyal Books

18 Jan 2017 21:24 | Author: greenelephant134 | Category: Resume sur la guerre de troie naura pas lieu

The paragraph about the theme that sacrifice is necessary is written like the writer believes the violence of the French Revolution (like the guillotine) was necessary, but to me it seemed like Dickens was clearly condemning the violence, if not the revolution itself. It also uses what Mrs. Defarge said to her husband, but she's a villain in the story, and I don't think we should be taking her word for it.

Comments
  1. author
    人妻美人スナィパー♡эgоιśт®♡ 18 Jan 2017 02:02

    The paragraph about the theme that sacrifice is necessary is written like the writer believes the violence of the French Revolution (like the guillotine) was necessary, but to me it seemed like Dickens was clearly condemning the violence, if not the revolution itself. It also uses what Mrs. Defarge said to her husband, but she''s a villain in the story, and I don''t think we should be taking her word for it.

    When you think of the French Revolution, a few things spring immediately to mind. Marie Antoinette. The Bastille. The Guillotine. A Tale of Two Cities.

    Yes, in what is a totally weird twist, Charles Dickens, who spent the majority of his literary career penning the exploits of London underdogs, also happened to write a novel that has become crystallized in the public imagination as synonymous with the French Revolution. It's weird, but it's also super-true.

  2. author
    blueswan744 18 Jan 2017 00:00

    Sydney Carton could be a regulation e book, a tumbler of wine, and a heart (representing the two his bravery and his love for Lucie) Dr. Manette could be a medical bag (or the Greek cadeuceus -- the emblem of drugs) The quantity he sticks interior the wall of the penal complex (I ignore what that s) and a shoe. Mme DeFarge might desire to be some knitting, a guillotine, and a weeping peasant lady.

  3. author
    bluebear110 18 Jan 2017 03:21

    Sorry for any bad language. A Tale of Two Cities - Charles Dickens. PLOT England and France are both filled with problems (poverty, violence, etc.). It’s 1775. Jarvis Lorry goes to Paris on a secret mission. He’s supposed to get Dr. Manette, who’s been locked up for 18 years in a prison called the Bastille, and bring him to London. Along the way, he meets Lucie and tells her that her dad’s not dead like she thought. Sure enough, in Paris, they find Dr. Manette, (he works with the Defarges) who is ****** in the head since being in prison. All he does is fix shoes. But he agrees to go back to London. In 1780, Charles Darnay is being accused of treason. Mr. Lorry, Lucie, and Dr. Marnette have to go to court as witnesses against Darnay (they were all traveling in the same carriage in 1775). But Darnay is not convicted because no one can say for sure if it was Darnay that night or not – he looks so much like a lawyer in the courtroom, Sydney Carton. Carton and Darnay both want Lucie. Darnay gets her. They get married. Dr. Manette is worried after he learns of Darnay’s past (he was an Evremonde), but he deals with the wedding then looses it for a couple of weeks. Things suck in France. Everything is dirty and people are poor. Except the rich people. They are so loaded they don’t care about anybody else. St. Evremonde runs over a child and then is murdered in his chateau (big, fancy house). Because Evremonde was his uncle, Darnay inherits the house and the money, but he doesn’t want it. He’s trying to be a normal guy who doesn’t take advantage of people. This is a good thing, because the poor people of France are sick and tired of being treated like **** so they revolt and burn the chateau and murder people. 12 years later, when he tries to help his old butler out of jail, Darnay is jailed. Bummer for Lucie and their daughter, who go to Paris with Dr. Manette to try and help. Mr. Lorry helps, too. After a while, Dr. Manette speaks on behalf of Darnay, and since Dr. Manette was a prisoner of the Bastille, he’s sort of a hero, so Darnay is let off the hook. But, wouldn’t you know, that same day, Darnay’s arrested again! Madame Defarge knows about Darnay’s past and since it was his rich family that had killed her poor family years before, she sets out for revenge. Darnay is sentenced to death. Dr. Manette looses it. Lucie’s a mess. Everything’s crap. But wait! Remember Sydney Carton? Well, he not only knows about Darnay’s sentence, but he hears that Madame Defarge is planning on messing with Lucie and her daughter and Dr. Manette. So he arranges to swap places with Darnay – they look alike, remember!? So, with Mr. Lorry’s help, this plan works. Darnay, Lucie, their daughter and Dr. Manette go to London. Carton gets his head cut off by the guillotine (head cutting off machine). Why did Carton agree to this plan? Pure, honest love for Lucie. http://www.schoolbytes.com/summary.php?id=441

  4. author
    blackmeercat299 18 Jan 2017 08:01

    The paragraph about the theme that sacrifice is necessary is written like the writer believes the violence of the French Revolution (like the guillotine) was necessary, but to me it seemed like Dickens was clearly condemning the violence, if not the revolution itself. It also uses what Mrs. Defarge said to her husband, but she''''s a villain in the story, and I don''''t think we should be taking her word for it.

    When you think of the French Revolution, a few things spring immediately to mind. Marie Antoinette. The Bastille. The Guillotine. A Tale of Two Cities.

    Yes, in what is a totally weird twist, Charles Dickens, who spent the majority of his literary career penning the exploits of London underdogs, also happened to write a novel that has become crystallized in the public imagination as synonymous with the French Revolution. It''s weird, but it''s also super-true.

    There were a king with a large jaw and a queen with a plain face, on the throne of England; there were a king with a large jaw and a queen with a fair face, on the throne of France. In both countries it was clearer than crystal to the lords of the State preserves of loaves and fishes, that things in general were settled for ever.

  5. author
    User1489467554 17 Jan 2017 22:01

    The paragraph about the theme that sacrifice is necessary is written like the writer believes the violence of the French Revolution (like the guillotine) was necessary, but to me it seemed like Dickens was clearly condemning the violence, if not the revolution itself. It also uses what Mrs. Defarge said to her husband, but she''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s a villain in the story, and I don''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t think we should be taking her word for it.

    When you think of the French Revolution, a few things spring immediately to mind. Marie Antoinette. The Bastille. The Guillotine. A Tale of Two Cities.

    Yes, in what is a totally weird twist, Charles Dickens, who spent the majority of his literary career penning the exploits of London underdogs, also happened to write a novel that has become crystallized in the public imagination as synonymous with the French Revolution. It''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s weird, but it''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s also super-true.

    There were a king with a large jaw and a queen with a plain face, on the throne of England; there were a king with a large jaw and a queen with a fair face, on the throne of France. In both countries it was clearer than crystal to the lords of the State preserves of loaves and fishes, that things in general were settled for ever.

    The most important resurrections in the novel are those of Charles Darnay. First, Sydney Carton s resemblance to him saves him from being convicted and executed in England, and then, the same resemblance allows the latter to switch places with him in the Conciergerie. These resurrections are surrounded with heavily religious language that compare Carton s sacrifice of his own life for others sins to Christ s sacrifice on the cross.

    One of the primary effects of the upheaval caused by the French Revolution was due to its literally revolutionary influence; it turned society upside down and banged it on its head. When Darnay returns to France, he observes that the noblemen are in prison, while criminals are their jailors. The replacement of Darnay with Carton at the end of the novel is another reversal, illustrating that a bad man can replace a good man in such a revolutionary society.

    During the turbulent days of the French Revolution, Frenchwoman Lucie Manette falls in love with Englishman Charles Darnay who's hiding his true identity and purpose.

    An ex-aristocrat from France and an alcoholic English lawyer find themselves crossing paths and in love with the same woman during the French Revolution.

  6. author
    brownduck330 18 Jan 2017 01:11

    Book the First - Recalled to Life. I. The Period. It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it.

  7. author
    User1490126331 18 Jan 2017 08:43

    The paragraph about the theme that sacrifice is necessary is written like the writer believes the violence of the French Revolution (like the guillotine) was necessary, but to me it seemed like Dickens was clearly condemning the violence, if not the revolution itself. It also uses what Mrs. Defarge said to her husband, but she''''''''''''''''s a villain in the story, and I don''''''''''''''''t think we should be taking her word for it.

    When you think of the French Revolution, a few things spring immediately to mind. Marie Antoinette. The Bastille. The Guillotine. A Tale of Two Cities.

    Yes, in what is a totally weird twist, Charles Dickens, who spent the majority of his literary career penning the exploits of London underdogs, also happened to write a novel that has become crystallized in the public imagination as synonymous with the French Revolution. It''''''''s weird, but it''''''''s also super-true.

    There were a king with a large jaw and a queen with a plain face, on the throne of England; there were a king with a large jaw and a queen with a fair face, on the throne of France. In both countries it was clearer than crystal to the lords of the State preserves of loaves and fishes, that things in general were settled for ever.

  8. author
    User1491209537 18 Jan 2017 02:19

    The paragraph about the theme that sacrifice is necessary is written like the writer believes the violence of the French Revolution (like the guillotine) was necessary, but to me it seemed like Dickens was clearly condemning the violence, if not the revolution itself. It also uses what Mrs. Defarge said to her husband, but she''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s a villain in the story, and I don''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t think we should be taking her word for it.

    When you think of the French Revolution, a few things spring immediately to mind. Marie Antoinette. The Bastille. The Guillotine. A Tale of Two Cities.

    Yes, in what is a totally weird twist, Charles Dickens, who spent the majority of his literary career penning the exploits of London underdogs, also happened to write a novel that has become crystallized in the public imagination as synonymous with the French Revolution. It''''''''''''''''s weird, but it''''''''''''''''s also super-true.

    There were a king with a large jaw and a queen with a plain face, on the throne of England; there were a king with a large jaw and a queen with a fair face, on the throne of France. In both countries it was clearer than crystal to the lords of the State preserves of loaves and fishes, that things in general were settled for ever.

    The most important resurrections in the novel are those of Charles Darnay. First, Sydney Carton s resemblance to him saves him from being convicted and executed in England, and then, the same resemblance allows the latter to switch places with him in the Conciergerie. These resurrections are surrounded with heavily religious language that compare Carton s sacrifice of his own life for others sins to Christ s sacrifice on the cross.

    One of the primary effects of the upheaval caused by the French Revolution was due to its literally revolutionary influence; it turned society upside down and banged it on its head. When Darnay returns to France, he observes that the noblemen are in prison, while criminals are their jailors. The replacement of Darnay with Carton at the end of the novel is another reversal, illustrating that a bad man can replace a good man in such a revolutionary society.

  9. author
    User1491681160 17 Jan 2017 23:21

    The paragraph about the theme that sacrifice is necessary is written like the writer believes the violence of the French Revolution (like the guillotine) was necessary, but to me it seemed like Dickens was clearly condemning the violence, if not the revolution itself. It also uses what Mrs. Defarge said to her husband, but she''''''''s a villain in the story, and I don''''''''t think we should be taking her word for it.

    When you think of the French Revolution, a few things spring immediately to mind. Marie Antoinette. The Bastille. The Guillotine. A Tale of Two Cities.

    Yes, in what is a totally weird twist, Charles Dickens, who spent the majority of his literary career penning the exploits of London underdogs, also happened to write a novel that has become crystallized in the public imagination as synonymous with the French Revolution. It''''s weird, but it''''s also super-true.

    There were a king with a large jaw and a queen with a plain face, on the throne of England; there were a king with a large jaw and a queen with a fair face, on the throne of France. In both countries it was clearer than crystal to the lords of the State preserves of loaves and fishes, that things in general were settled for ever.

  10. author
    User1490846701 18 Jan 2017 01:08

    The paragraph about the theme that sacrifice is necessary is written like the writer believes the violence of the French Revolution (like the guillotine) was necessary, but to me it seemed like Dickens was clearly condemning the violence, if not the revolution itself. It also uses what Mrs. Defarge said to her husband, but she''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s a villain in the story, and I don''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t think we should be taking her word for it.

    When you think of the French Revolution, a few things spring immediately to mind. Marie Antoinette. The Bastille. The Guillotine. A Tale of Two Cities.

    Yes, in what is a totally weird twist, Charles Dickens, who spent the majority of his literary career penning the exploits of London underdogs, also happened to write a novel that has become crystallized in the public imagination as synonymous with the French Revolution. It''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s weird, but it''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s also super-true.

    There were a king with a large jaw and a queen with a plain face, on the throne of England; there were a king with a large jaw and a queen with a fair face, on the throne of France. In both countries it was clearer than crystal to the lords of the State preserves of loaves and fishes, that things in general were settled for ever.

    The most important resurrections in the novel are those of Charles Darnay. First, Sydney Carton s resemblance to him saves him from being convicted and executed in England, and then, the same resemblance allows the latter to switch places with him in the Conciergerie. These resurrections are surrounded with heavily religious language that compare Carton s sacrifice of his own life for others sins to Christ s sacrifice on the cross.

    One of the primary effects of the upheaval caused by the French Revolution was due to its literally revolutionary influence; it turned society upside down and banged it on its head. When Darnay returns to France, he observes that the noblemen are in prison, while criminals are their jailors. The replacement of Darnay with Carton at the end of the novel is another reversal, illustrating that a bad man can replace a good man in such a revolutionary society.

    During the turbulent days of the French Revolution, Frenchwoman Lucie Manette falls in love with Englishman Charles Darnay who''''s hiding his true identity and purpose.

    An ex-aristocrat from France and an alcoholic English lawyer find themselves crossing paths and in love with the same woman during the French Revolution.

    A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

    Novelguide.com is the premier free source for literary analysis on the web. We provide an educational supplement for better understanding of classic and contemporary literature. Novelguide.com is continually in the process of adding more books to the website each week. Please check back weekly to see what we have added. Please let us know if you have any suggestions or comments or would like any additional information. Thanks for checking out our website. More Details

  11. author
    Б. Тамир 17 Jan 2017 22:11

    The paragraph about the theme that sacrifice is necessary is written like the writer believes the violence of the French Revolution (like the guillotine) was necessary, but to me it seemed like Dickens was clearly condemning the violence, if not the revolution itself. It also uses what Mrs. Defarge said to her husband, but she''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s a villain in the story, and I don''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t think we should be taking her word for it.

    When you think of the French Revolution, a few things spring immediately to mind. Marie Antoinette. The Bastille. The Guillotine. A Tale of Two Cities.

    Yes, in what is a totally weird twist, Charles Dickens, who spent the majority of his literary career penning the exploits of London underdogs, also happened to write a novel that has become crystallized in the public imagination as synonymous with the French Revolution. It''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s weird, but it''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s also super-true.

    There were a king with a large jaw and a queen with a plain face, on the throne of England; there were a king with a large jaw and a queen with a fair face, on the throne of France. In both countries it was clearer than crystal to the lords of the State preserves of loaves and fishes, that things in general were settled for ever.

    The most important resurrections in the novel are those of Charles Darnay. First, Sydney Carton s resemblance to him saves him from being convicted and executed in England, and then, the same resemblance allows the latter to switch places with him in the Conciergerie. These resurrections are surrounded with heavily religious language that compare Carton s sacrifice of his own life for others sins to Christ s sacrifice on the cross.

    One of the primary effects of the upheaval caused by the French Revolution was due to its literally revolutionary influence; it turned society upside down and banged it on its head. When Darnay returns to France, he observes that the noblemen are in prison, while criminals are their jailors. The replacement of Darnay with Carton at the end of the novel is another reversal, illustrating that a bad man can replace a good man in such a revolutionary society.

    During the turbulent days of the French Revolution, Frenchwoman Lucie Manette falls in love with Englishman Charles Darnay who''s hiding his true identity and purpose.

    An ex-aristocrat from France and an alcoholic English lawyer find themselves crossing paths and in love with the same woman during the French Revolution.

    A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

    Novelguide.com is the premier free source for literary analysis on the web. We provide an educational supplement for better understanding of classic and contemporary literature. Novelguide.com is continually in the process of adding more books to the website each week. Please check back weekly to see what we have added. Please let us know if you have any suggestions or comments or would like any additional information. Thanks for checking out our website. More Details