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18 Jan 2017 21:24 | Author: User1492176631 | Category: Restaurant server resume sample

If children are paid for better grades, they will want to do better in school. We don't have to pay children for D's and F's, this is rewards for GOOD GRADES, not just for being at school. When students are paid for good grades, they learn that working hard and making good choices does have its rewards. They will try to make better grades, in the hopes of earning more money. Children will also learn responsibility and the value of money; rather than just begging Mom and Dad for all the toys and video games they want, they will work harder and save up for their next purchase. Moreover, many schools have fundraisers for various charities and projects. Rather than dragging Mom across the neighborhood to sell cookies and making Dad bug his coworkers to buy chocolates, the students will buy these on their own, and help the school itself.

Kids would be smarter because they want money. Kids these days don't listen to teachers because they believe it is a waste of time but if they get paid for good grades, they would listen and they would be smarter. They would also have a better chance at having a good job. If kids get money for good grades, they would have a better chance of getting a good college education. It would be easier for teachers to teach because the students would know that if they did not listen, they would not get any money. Also, kids would not be tardy because if they missed anything, they may not receive a good grade.

Comments
  1. author
    Руслан Краплич 18 Jan 2017 08:59

    I think kids should get paid for doing their homework because it would encourage them to actually do something and they can earn money and good grades so they won''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t get held back in school and they will also try their best in classes and teachers won''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t be stressed out because we don''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t complete an assignment.

    I am a student. Mostly As and Bs. I would LOVE to be payed more money for my hard work and think of this students would try harder if they new they would be payed. For example if your a really smart kid and you need money for college thats a way to save up. Also many high school students are dropping out maybe if money was offered they would stay and at least try!

    - Meh! Secret! :PP

    Students offered cash incentives in the Louisiana program didn''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t just enroll in more classes; they earned more credits and were more likely to attain a C average than were nonparticipants. And they showed psychological benefits too, reporting more positive feelings about themselves and their abilities to accomplish their goals for the future. "It''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s not very often that you see effects of this magnitude for anything that we test," notes Thomas Brock, MDRC''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s director for young adults and postsecondary-education policy.

    Although U.S. college enrollment has climbed, college completion rates have not. Only a third of students who enroll in community colleges — which educate nearly half the undergraduates in the U.S. — get a degree within six years. Hence the interest in this study among such philanthropic powerhouses as the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, which helped fund the MDRC study. (MDRC, by the way, was created in 1974 by the Ford Foundation and a group of federal agencies; originally named the Manpower Demonstration Research Corporation, it now goes only by the abbreviation.)

    Advertiser Disclosure: The credit card offers that appear on this site are from credit card companies from which MoneyCrashers.com receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site, including, for example, the order in which they appear on category pages. MoneyCrashers.com does not include all credit card companies or all available credit card offers, although best efforts are made to include a comprehensive list of offers regardless of compensation. Advertiser partners include American Express, U.S. Bank, and Barclaycard, among others.

    Did your parents decide to add a little extra incentive to your school work by bringing money into the fold?
    More and more, I hear of parents (sometimes even relatives other than parents) that are willing to financially “reward” students for positive results in the classroom. Is this a smart move, or could it be sending the wrong message, both financially and academically?

    Do you really get what you pay for? At the shoe store, yes. But when it comes to paying kids for grades, probably not – especially if what you’re trying to buy is a life-long love of learning.


    Long a tactic of fed-up parents, the idea of paying for good grades has migrated from the family room to the school house. In states ranging from Texas to Massachusetts, a growing number of students are pocketing cold cash for good grades or test scores on Advanced Placement and SAT exams, typically through privately funded programs.

    I love teaching Pre-K. It is about bonding with children, loving children, and helping children develop a love for learning for years to come. -Michele Upshaw, Pre-K Center Teacher of the Year

    I love the process of watching kids learn and grow. The relationships that develop through this last a lifetime! -Kyle Kirk, Charles Spencer Elementary School Teacher of the Year

    “Go into any inner-city neighborhood, and folks will tell you that government alone can’t teach kids to learn.They know that parents have to parent, that children can’t achieve unless we raise their expectations and turn off the television sets and eradicate the slander that says a black youth with a book is acting white.”
    —Barack Obama, Keynote Address, Democratic National Convention, 2004

    Acting white was once a label used by scholars, writing in obscure journals, to characterize academically inclined, but allegedly snobbish, minority students who were shunned by their peers.

  2. author
    User1488057183 18 Jan 2017 00:21

    I think kids should get paid for doing their homework because it would encourage them to actually do something and they can earn money and good grades so they won''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t get held back in school and they will also try their best in classes and teachers won''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t be stressed out because we don''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t complete an assignment.

    I am a student. Mostly As and Bs. I would LOVE to be payed more money for my hard work and think of this students would try harder if they new they would be payed. For example if your a really smart kid and you need money for college thats a way to save up. Also many high school students are dropping out maybe if money was offered they would stay and at least try!

    - Meh! Secret! :PP

    Students offered cash incentives in the Louisiana program didn''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t just enroll in more classes; they earned more credits and were more likely to attain a C average than were nonparticipants. And they showed psychological benefits too, reporting more positive feelings about themselves and their abilities to accomplish their goals for the future. "It''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s not very often that you see effects of this magnitude for anything that we test," notes Thomas Brock, MDRC''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s director for young adults and postsecondary-education policy.

    Although U.S. college enrollment has climbed, college completion rates have not. Only a third of students who enroll in community colleges — which educate nearly half the undergraduates in the U.S. — get a degree within six years. Hence the interest in this study among such philanthropic powerhouses as the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, which helped fund the MDRC study. (MDRC, by the way, was created in 1974 by the Ford Foundation and a group of federal agencies; originally named the Manpower Demonstration Research Corporation, it now goes only by the abbreviation.)

    Advertiser Disclosure: The credit card offers that appear on this site are from credit card companies from which MoneyCrashers.com receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site, including, for example, the order in which they appear on category pages. MoneyCrashers.com does not include all credit card companies or all available credit card offers, although best efforts are made to include a comprehensive list of offers regardless of compensation. Advertiser partners include American Express, U.S. Bank, and Barclaycard, among others.

    Did your parents decide to add a little extra incentive to your school work by bringing money into the fold?
    More and more, I hear of parents (sometimes even relatives other than parents) that are willing to financially “reward” students for positive results in the classroom. Is this a smart move, or could it be sending the wrong message, both financially and academically?

    Do you really get what you pay for? At the shoe store, yes. But when it comes to paying kids for grades, probably not – especially if what you’re trying to buy is a life-long love of learning.


    Long a tactic of fed-up parents, the idea of paying for good grades has migrated from the family room to the school house. In states ranging from Texas to Massachusetts, a growing number of students are pocketing cold cash for good grades or test scores on Advanced Placement and SAT exams, typically through privately funded programs.

    I love teaching Pre-K. It is about bonding with children, loving children, and helping children develop a love for learning for years to come. -Michele Upshaw, Pre-K Center Teacher of the Year

    I love the process of watching kids learn and grow. The relationships that develop through this last a lifetime! -Kyle Kirk, Charles Spencer Elementary School Teacher of the Year

    “Go into any inner-city neighborhood, and folks will tell you that government alone can’t teach kids to learn.They know that parents have to parent, that children can’t achieve unless we raise their expectations and turn off the television sets and eradicate the slander that says a black youth with a book is acting white.”
    —Barack Obama, Keynote Address, Democratic National Convention, 2004

    Acting white was once a label used by scholars, writing in obscure journals, to characterize academically inclined, but allegedly snobbish, minority students who were shunned by their peers.

  3. author
    User1488747582 17 Jan 2017 23:35

    I think kids should get paid for doing their homework because it would encourage them to actually do something and they can earn money and good grades so they won''''t get held back in school and they will also try their best in classes and teachers won''''t be stressed out because we don''''t complete an assignment.

    I am a student. Mostly As and Bs. I would LOVE to be payed more money for my hard work and think of this students would try harder if they new they would be payed. For example if your a really smart kid and you need money for college thats a way to save up. Also many high school students are dropping out maybe if money was offered they would stay and at least try!

    - Meh! Secret! :PP

    Students offered cash incentives in the Louisiana program didn''t just enroll in more classes; they earned more credits and were more likely to attain a C average than were nonparticipants. And they showed psychological benefits too, reporting more positive feelings about themselves and their abilities to accomplish their goals for the future. "It''s not very often that you see effects of this magnitude for anything that we test," notes Thomas Brock, MDRC''s director for young adults and postsecondary-education policy.

    Although U.S. college enrollment has climbed, college completion rates have not. Only a third of students who enroll in community colleges — which educate nearly half the undergraduates in the U.S. — get a degree within six years. Hence the interest in this study among such philanthropic powerhouses as the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, which helped fund the MDRC study. (MDRC, by the way, was created in 1974 by the Ford Foundation and a group of federal agencies; originally named the Manpower Demonstration Research Corporation, it now goes only by the abbreviation.)

    Advertiser Disclosure: The credit card offers that appear on this site are from credit card companies from which MoneyCrashers.com receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site, including, for example, the order in which they appear on category pages. MoneyCrashers.com does not include all credit card companies or all available credit card offers, although best efforts are made to include a comprehensive list of offers regardless of compensation. Advertiser partners include American Express, U.S. Bank, and Barclaycard, among others.

    Did your parents decide to add a little extra incentive to your school work by bringing money into the fold?
    More and more, I hear of parents (sometimes even relatives other than parents) that are willing to financially “reward” students for positive results in the classroom. Is this a smart move, or could it be sending the wrong message, both financially and academically?

  4. author
    User1489590121 18 Jan 2017 00:19

    I think kids should get paid for doing their homework because it would encourage them to actually do something and they can earn money and good grades so they won''''''''''''''''t get held back in school and they will also try their best in classes and teachers won''''''''''''''''t be stressed out because we don''''''''''''''''t complete an assignment.

    I am a student. Mostly As and Bs. I would LOVE to be payed more money for my hard work and think of this students would try harder if they new they would be payed. For example if your a really smart kid and you need money for college thats a way to save up. Also many high school students are dropping out maybe if money was offered they would stay and at least try!

    - Meh! Secret! :PP

    Students offered cash incentives in the Louisiana program didn''''''''t just enroll in more classes; they earned more credits and were more likely to attain a C average than were nonparticipants. And they showed psychological benefits too, reporting more positive feelings about themselves and their abilities to accomplish their goals for the future. "It''''''''s not very often that you see effects of this magnitude for anything that we test," notes Thomas Brock, MDRC''''''''s director for young adults and postsecondary-education policy.

    Although U.S. college enrollment has climbed, college completion rates have not. Only a third of students who enroll in community colleges — which educate nearly half the undergraduates in the U.S. — get a degree within six years. Hence the interest in this study among such philanthropic powerhouses as the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, which helped fund the MDRC study. (MDRC, by the way, was created in 1974 by the Ford Foundation and a group of federal agencies; originally named the Manpower Demonstration Research Corporation, it now goes only by the abbreviation.)

    Advertiser Disclosure: The credit card offers that appear on this site are from credit card companies from which MoneyCrashers.com receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site, including, for example, the order in which they appear on category pages. MoneyCrashers.com does not include all credit card companies or all available credit card offers, although best efforts are made to include a comprehensive list of offers regardless of compensation. Advertiser partners include American Express, U.S. Bank, and Barclaycard, among others.

    Did your parents decide to add a little extra incentive to your school work by bringing money into the fold?
    More and more, I hear of parents (sometimes even relatives other than parents) that are willing to financially “reward” students for positive results in the classroom. Is this a smart move, or could it be sending the wrong message, both financially and academically?

    Do you really get what you pay for? At the shoe store, yes. But when it comes to paying kids for grades, probably not – especially if what you’re trying to buy is a life-long love of learning.


    Long a tactic of fed-up parents, the idea of paying for good grades has migrated from the family room to the school house. In states ranging from Texas to Massachusetts, a growing number of students are pocketing cold cash for good grades or test scores on Advanced Placement and SAT exams, typically through privately funded programs.

  5. author
    User1487902343 17 Jan 2017 23:36

    I think kids should get paid for doing their homework because it would encourage them to actually do something and they can earn money and good grades so they won''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t get held back in school and they will also try their best in classes and teachers won''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t be stressed out because we don''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t complete an assignment.

    I am a student. Mostly As and Bs. I would LOVE to be payed more money for my hard work and think of this students would try harder if they new they would be payed. For example if your a really smart kid and you need money for college thats a way to save up. Also many high school students are dropping out maybe if money was offered they would stay and at least try!

    - Meh! Secret! :PP

    Students offered cash incentives in the Louisiana program didn''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t just enroll in more classes; they earned more credits and were more likely to attain a C average than were nonparticipants. And they showed psychological benefits too, reporting more positive feelings about themselves and their abilities to accomplish their goals for the future. "It''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s not very often that you see effects of this magnitude for anything that we test," notes Thomas Brock, MDRC''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s director for young adults and postsecondary-education policy.

    Although U.S. college enrollment has climbed, college completion rates have not. Only a third of students who enroll in community colleges — which educate nearly half the undergraduates in the U.S. — get a degree within six years. Hence the interest in this study among such philanthropic powerhouses as the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, which helped fund the MDRC study. (MDRC, by the way, was created in 1974 by the Ford Foundation and a group of federal agencies; originally named the Manpower Demonstration Research Corporation, it now goes only by the abbreviation.)

    Advertiser Disclosure: The credit card offers that appear on this site are from credit card companies from which MoneyCrashers.com receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site, including, for example, the order in which they appear on category pages. MoneyCrashers.com does not include all credit card companies or all available credit card offers, although best efforts are made to include a comprehensive list of offers regardless of compensation. Advertiser partners include American Express, U.S. Bank, and Barclaycard, among others.

    Did your parents decide to add a little extra incentive to your school work by bringing money into the fold?
    More and more, I hear of parents (sometimes even relatives other than parents) that are willing to financially “reward” students for positive results in the classroom. Is this a smart move, or could it be sending the wrong message, both financially and academically?

    Do you really get what you pay for? At the shoe store, yes. But when it comes to paying kids for grades, probably not – especially if what you’re trying to buy is a life-long love of learning.


    Long a tactic of fed-up parents, the idea of paying for good grades has migrated from the family room to the school house. In states ranging from Texas to Massachusetts, a growing number of students are pocketing cold cash for good grades or test scores on Advanced Placement and SAT exams, typically through privately funded programs.

    I love teaching Pre-K. It is about bonding with children, loving children, and helping children develop a love for learning for years to come. -Michele Upshaw, Pre-K Center Teacher of the Year

    I love the process of watching kids learn and grow. The relationships that develop through this last a lifetime! -Kyle Kirk, Charles Spencer Elementary School Teacher of the Year

    “Go into any inner-city neighborhood, and folks will tell you that government alone can’t teach kids to learn.They know that parents have to parent, that children can’t achieve unless we raise their expectations and turn off the television sets and eradicate the slander that says a black youth with a book is acting white.”
    —Barack Obama, Keynote Address, Democratic National Convention, 2004

    Acting white was once a label used by scholars, writing in obscure journals, to characterize academically inclined, but allegedly snobbish, minority students who were shunned by their peers.

  6. author
    organicgorilla995 18 Jan 2017 07:08

    I think kids should get paid for doing their homework because it would encourage them to actually do something and they can earn money and good grades so they won''t get held back in school and they will also try their best in classes and teachers won''t be stressed out because we don''t complete an assignment.

    I am a student. Mostly As and Bs. I would LOVE to be payed more money for my hard work and think of this students would try harder if they new they would be payed. For example if your a really smart kid and you need money for college thats a way to save up. Also many high school students are dropping out maybe if money was offered they would stay and at least try!

    - Meh! Secret! :PP

    Students offered cash incentives in the Louisiana program didn't just enroll in more classes; they earned more credits and were more likely to attain a C average than were nonparticipants. And they showed psychological benefits too, reporting more positive feelings about themselves and their abilities to accomplish their goals for the future. "It's not very often that you see effects of this magnitude for anything that we test," notes Thomas Brock, MDRC's director for young adults and postsecondary-education policy.

    Although U.S. college enrollment has climbed, college completion rates have not. Only a third of students who enroll in community colleges — which educate nearly half the undergraduates in the U.S. — get a degree within six years. Hence the interest in this study among such philanthropic powerhouses as the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, which helped fund the MDRC study. (MDRC, by the way, was created in 1974 by the Ford Foundation and a group of federal agencies; originally named the Manpower Demonstration Research Corporation, it now goes only by the abbreviation.)

  7. author
    User1488143510 18 Jan 2017 03:41

    I think kids should get paid for doing their homework because it would encourage them to actually do something and they can earn money and good grades so they won''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t get held back in school and they will also try their best in classes and teachers won''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t be stressed out because we don''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t complete an assignment.

    I am a student. Mostly As and Bs. I would LOVE to be payed more money for my hard work and think of this students would try harder if they new they would be payed. For example if your a really smart kid and you need money for college thats a way to save up. Also many high school students are dropping out maybe if money was offered they would stay and at least try!

    - Meh! Secret! :PP

    Students offered cash incentives in the Louisiana program didn''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t just enroll in more classes; they earned more credits and were more likely to attain a C average than were nonparticipants. And they showed psychological benefits too, reporting more positive feelings about themselves and their abilities to accomplish their goals for the future. "It''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s not very often that you see effects of this magnitude for anything that we test," notes Thomas Brock, MDRC''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s director for young adults and postsecondary-education policy.

    Although U.S. college enrollment has climbed, college completion rates have not. Only a third of students who enroll in community colleges — which educate nearly half the undergraduates in the U.S. — get a degree within six years. Hence the interest in this study among such philanthropic powerhouses as the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, which helped fund the MDRC study. (MDRC, by the way, was created in 1974 by the Ford Foundation and a group of federal agencies; originally named the Manpower Demonstration Research Corporation, it now goes only by the abbreviation.)

    Advertiser Disclosure: The credit card offers that appear on this site are from credit card companies from which MoneyCrashers.com receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site, including, for example, the order in which they appear on category pages. MoneyCrashers.com does not include all credit card companies or all available credit card offers, although best efforts are made to include a comprehensive list of offers regardless of compensation. Advertiser partners include American Express, U.S. Bank, and Barclaycard, among others.

    Did your parents decide to add a little extra incentive to your school work by bringing money into the fold?
    More and more, I hear of parents (sometimes even relatives other than parents) that are willing to financially “reward” students for positive results in the classroom. Is this a smart move, or could it be sending the wrong message, both financially and academically?

    Do you really get what you pay for? At the shoe store, yes. But when it comes to paying kids for grades, probably not – especially if what you’re trying to buy is a life-long love of learning.


    Long a tactic of fed-up parents, the idea of paying for good grades has migrated from the family room to the school house. In states ranging from Texas to Massachusetts, a growing number of students are pocketing cold cash for good grades or test scores on Advanced Placement and SAT exams, typically through privately funded programs.

    I love teaching Pre-K. It is about bonding with children, loving children, and helping children develop a love for learning for years to come. -Michele Upshaw, Pre-K Center Teacher of the Year

    I love the process of watching kids learn and grow. The relationships that develop through this last a lifetime! -Kyle Kirk, Charles Spencer Elementary School Teacher of the Year

  8. author
    browngoose321 17 Jan 2017 23:35

    In my opinion good grades shouldn t be paid for better grades. Maybe a special favorite meal or treated to the movie they are dying to see. But no money. They already are provided room board, clothing transportation etc. The true payment of good grades and a good ACT score is college scholarships. Worth more than any money payment for good grades. Over a life time a college degree is currently worth 1 million dollars more in income. At the current cost of college educations scholarships are invaluable to have.

  9. author
    User1489485039 18 Jan 2017 02:18

    who s gonna pay them? the taxpayers?

  10. author
    кис кис бля 18 Jan 2017 02:28

    The social price paid by the best and brightest minority students

  11. author
    User1491194069 18 Jan 2017 06:33

    I think kids should get paid for doing their homework because it would encourage them to actually do something and they can earn money and good grades so they won''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t get held back in school and they will also try their best in classes and teachers won''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t be stressed out because we don''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t complete an assignment.

    I am a student. Mostly As and Bs. I would LOVE to be payed more money for my hard work and think of this students would try harder if they new they would be payed. For example if your a really smart kid and you need money for college thats a way to save up. Also many high school students are dropping out maybe if money was offered they would stay and at least try!

    - Meh! Secret! :PP

    Students offered cash incentives in the Louisiana program didn''''''''''''''''t just enroll in more classes; they earned more credits and were more likely to attain a C average than were nonparticipants. And they showed psychological benefits too, reporting more positive feelings about themselves and their abilities to accomplish their goals for the future. "It''''''''''''''''s not very often that you see effects of this magnitude for anything that we test," notes Thomas Brock, MDRC''''''''''''''''s director for young adults and postsecondary-education policy.

    Although U.S. college enrollment has climbed, college completion rates have not. Only a third of students who enroll in community colleges — which educate nearly half the undergraduates in the U.S. — get a degree within six years. Hence the interest in this study among such philanthropic powerhouses as the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, which helped fund the MDRC study. (MDRC, by the way, was created in 1974 by the Ford Foundation and a group of federal agencies; originally named the Manpower Demonstration Research Corporation, it now goes only by the abbreviation.)

    Advertiser Disclosure: The credit card offers that appear on this site are from credit card companies from which MoneyCrashers.com receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site, including, for example, the order in which they appear on category pages. MoneyCrashers.com does not include all credit card companies or all available credit card offers, although best efforts are made to include a comprehensive list of offers regardless of compensation. Advertiser partners include American Express, U.S. Bank, and Barclaycard, among others.

    Did your parents decide to add a little extra incentive to your school work by bringing money into the fold?
    More and more, I hear of parents (sometimes even relatives other than parents) that are willing to financially “reward” students for positive results in the classroom. Is this a smart move, or could it be sending the wrong message, both financially and academically?

    Do you really get what you pay for? At the shoe store, yes. But when it comes to paying kids for grades, probably not – especially if what you’re trying to buy is a life-long love of learning.


    Long a tactic of fed-up parents, the idea of paying for good grades has migrated from the family room to the school house. In states ranging from Texas to Massachusetts, a growing number of students are pocketing cold cash for good grades or test scores on Advanced Placement and SAT exams, typically through privately funded programs.

  12. author
    lazyfrog751 18 Jan 2017 05:48

    Exactly where do you think this reward money would be coming from ? Some school boards are letting teachers go because they have to balance a budget.As it is teachers provide many supplies for students , material for craft projects, books for in class resources and some even bring a few extra items for lunch just in case a "student forgets their lunch".There is no money in the budget for such rewards.Success should be its own reward.When my daughters were in public school they were given certificates for Academic Success,Academic Effort and Academic Improvement.no money. When you say that students with good grades should get a financial reward for their hard work ,what about the student who tried their best, gave 100% and a C was the best they would ever achieve academically.What lesson does your reward system teach that child? At the secondary level the students are eligible for grants,bursaries and scholarships in their graduating year

  13. author
    ticklishduck207 18 Jan 2017 03:59

    I think kids should get paid for doing their homework because it would encourage them to actually do something and they can earn money and good grades so they won''''''''t get held back in school and they will also try their best in classes and teachers won''''''''t be stressed out because we don''''''''t complete an assignment.

    I am a student. Mostly As and Bs. I would LOVE to be payed more money for my hard work and think of this students would try harder if they new they would be payed. For example if your a really smart kid and you need money for college thats a way to save up. Also many high school students are dropping out maybe if money was offered they would stay and at least try!

    - Meh! Secret! :PP

    Students offered cash incentives in the Louisiana program didn''''t just enroll in more classes; they earned more credits and were more likely to attain a C average than were nonparticipants. And they showed psychological benefits too, reporting more positive feelings about themselves and their abilities to accomplish their goals for the future. "It''''s not very often that you see effects of this magnitude for anything that we test," notes Thomas Brock, MDRC''''s director for young adults and postsecondary-education policy.

    Although U.S. college enrollment has climbed, college completion rates have not. Only a third of students who enroll in community colleges — which educate nearly half the undergraduates in the U.S. — get a degree within six years. Hence the interest in this study among such philanthropic powerhouses as the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, which helped fund the MDRC study. (MDRC, by the way, was created in 1974 by the Ford Foundation and a group of federal agencies; originally named the Manpower Demonstration Research Corporation, it now goes only by the abbreviation.)

    Advertiser Disclosure: The credit card offers that appear on this site are from credit card companies from which MoneyCrashers.com receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site, including, for example, the order in which they appear on category pages. MoneyCrashers.com does not include all credit card companies or all available credit card offers, although best efforts are made to include a comprehensive list of offers regardless of compensation. Advertiser partners include American Express, U.S. Bank, and Barclaycard, among others.

    Did your parents decide to add a little extra incentive to your school work by bringing money into the fold?
    More and more, I hear of parents (sometimes even relatives other than parents) that are willing to financially “reward” students for positive results in the classroom. Is this a smart move, or could it be sending the wrong message, both financially and academically?

    Do you really get what you pay for? At the shoe store, yes. But when it comes to paying kids for grades, probably not – especially if what you’re trying to buy is a life-long love of learning.


    Long a tactic of fed-up parents, the idea of paying for good grades has migrated from the family room to the school house. In states ranging from Texas to Massachusetts, a growing number of students are pocketing cold cash for good grades or test scores on Advanced Placement and SAT exams, typically through privately funded programs.