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The Shame of College Sports - The Atlantic

18 Jan 2017 21:24 | Author: User1490066604 | Category: Global history dbq essay example

When the NCAA was founded by President Roosevelt in 1905, the institution was committed to the idea of not providing a salary or stipend to the student-athletes who took part in its organization. It is based on the idea of amateurism, and this was a notable idea at the time.

But, over a century later, the NCAA is no longer recognizable compared to what the organization used to be. The NCAA has modernized to take full advantage of the new kinds of sports fans and especially the new kinds of media. Today, sports and athletics in the NCAA draw in around $11 billion every year for the organization. Its coaches and administrators make staggering amounts of money. From high salaries to performance bonuses, it seems that the NCAA is a very profitable business considering it is a non-profit organization.

Comments
  1. author
    purplegorilla109 18 Jan 2017 06:15

    When the NCAA was founded by President Roosevelt in 1905, the institution was committed to the idea of not providing a salary or stipend to the student-athletes who took part in its organization. It is based on the idea of amateurism, and this was a notable idea at the time.

    But, over a century later, the NCAA is no longer recognizable compared to what the organization used to be. The NCAA has modernized to take full advantage of the new kinds of sports fans and especially the new kinds of media. Today, sports and athletics in the NCAA draw in around $11 billion every year for the organization. Its coaches and administrators make staggering amounts of money. From high salaries to performance bonuses, it seems that the NCAA is a very profitable business considering it is a non-profit organization.

    There has been major discussion recently if college athletes should or shouldn''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t be paid while they are in school. The first thing opponents say is, "They''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''re already getting a scholarship! That''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s more than anybody else! Don''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t be greedy!"

    Fine, let''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s not be greedy and look at how much a scholarship is actually worth. On average, a full Division 1 scholarship is $25,000 per year.

    Burton, Richard. “College Athletes Are Already Paid With Their Education.” US News. U.S.News & World Report, 2 Apr. 2013. Web. 30 Apr. 2013.

    Johnson, Dennis A., and John Acquaviva. “Point/Counterpoint: Paying College Athletes.” The Sport Journal. United States Sports Academy, 2012. Web. 30 Apr. 2013.

    What has continued to be one of the most pressing issues in the world of sports today has now become a matter the NCAA can no longer afford to ignore. The service that college athletes provide to the institutions they attend in addition to millions of spectators all over the world is still not being rewarded in the manner that it should be for their above-average dedication, work ethic and most importantly, money brought in to their employer.

    The NCAA is a multi-billion dollar industry that generated over $845 billion last year due to their players’ ability to entertain and perform to their fullest extent at all times. So with all of this money flowing in why wouldn’t they provide their athletes a stipend?

    Joe Nocera is an Op-Ed columnist for The Times and the co-author of “All the Devils Are Here: The Hidden History of the Financial Crisis.”

    As the head boy’s basketball coach at The Westtown (Pa.) School for the past 10 years, I've seen 10 of my players go on to play Division I basketball. This year, we have another five kids on our roster who already have D-I scholarship offers. I’ve witnessed the recruitment and collegiate experiences of my players, and I believe combination of the hours a D-I player is required to commit to his team and the current academic requirements for basketball players do a disservice to players and to coaches alike.

    On Friday, the student-athlete has a 14-hour travel day to prepare for an away game on Saturday, which is a 16-hour day that bleeds into early Sunday morning, since the team charters a plane back to campus after the game.

  2. author
    Love Will Tear 17 Jan 2017 22:17

    When the NCAA was founded by President Roosevelt in 1905, the institution was committed to the idea of not providing a salary or stipend to the student-athletes who took part in its organization. It is based on the idea of amateurism, and this was a notable idea at the time.

    But, over a century later, the NCAA is no longer recognizable compared to what the organization used to be. The NCAA has modernized to take full advantage of the new kinds of sports fans and especially the new kinds of media. Today, sports and athletics in the NCAA draw in around $11 billion every year for the organization. Its coaches and administrators make staggering amounts of money. From high salaries to performance bonuses, it seems that the NCAA is a very profitable business considering it is a non-profit organization.

    There has been major discussion recently if college athletes should or shouldn''t be paid while they are in school. The first thing opponents say is, "They''re already getting a scholarship! That''s more than anybody else! Don''t be greedy!"

    Fine, let''s not be greedy and look at how much a scholarship is actually worth. On average, a full Division 1 scholarship is $25,000 per year.

  3. author
    User1488489376 18 Jan 2017 05:51

    When the NCAA was founded by President Roosevelt in 1905, the institution was committed to the idea of not providing a salary or stipend to the student-athletes who took part in its organization. It is based on the idea of amateurism, and this was a notable idea at the time.

    But, over a century later, the NCAA is no longer recognizable compared to what the organization used to be. The NCAA has modernized to take full advantage of the new kinds of sports fans and especially the new kinds of media. Today, sports and athletics in the NCAA draw in around $11 billion every year for the organization. Its coaches and administrators make staggering amounts of money. From high salaries to performance bonuses, it seems that the NCAA is a very profitable business considering it is a non-profit organization.

    There has been major discussion recently if college athletes should or shouldn''''''''''''''''t be paid while they are in school. The first thing opponents say is, "They''''''''''''''''re already getting a scholarship! That''''''''''''''''s more than anybody else! Don''''''''''''''''t be greedy!"

    Fine, let''''''''''''''''s not be greedy and look at how much a scholarship is actually worth. On average, a full Division 1 scholarship is $25,000 per year.

    Burton, Richard. “College Athletes Are Already Paid With Their Education.” US News. U.S.News & World Report, 2 Apr. 2013. Web. 30 Apr. 2013.

    Johnson, Dennis A., and John Acquaviva. “Point/Counterpoint: Paying College Athletes.” The Sport Journal. United States Sports Academy, 2012. Web. 30 Apr. 2013.

    What has continued to be one of the most pressing issues in the world of sports today has now become a matter the NCAA can no longer afford to ignore. The service that college athletes provide to the institutions they attend in addition to millions of spectators all over the world is still not being rewarded in the manner that it should be for their above-average dedication, work ethic and most importantly, money brought in to their employer.

    The NCAA is a multi-billion dollar industry that generated over $845 billion last year due to their players’ ability to entertain and perform to their fullest extent at all times. So with all of this money flowing in why wouldn’t they provide their athletes a stipend?

  4. author
    organicrabbit647 17 Jan 2017 23:00

    I m not sure whether you ve already been accepted into college, or are still early in high school. If you ve already been accepted, then clearly that college considers you suitable. One tip would be, since it s a new place, be super-friendly to everyone. You may meet many of your lifetime friends in the first two weeks. If you re in high school, then keep your grades up, and prep for the SAT. Also, it helps to have extracurricular activities. Speak with your school counselor. Colleges are looking for students who do more than the bare minimum.

  5. author
    User1489867344 18 Jan 2017 09:16

    When the NCAA was founded by President Roosevelt in 1905, the institution was committed to the idea of not providing a salary or stipend to the student-athletes who took part in its organization. It is based on the idea of amateurism, and this was a notable idea at the time.

    But, over a century later, the NCAA is no longer recognizable compared to what the organization used to be. The NCAA has modernized to take full advantage of the new kinds of sports fans and especially the new kinds of media. Today, sports and athletics in the NCAA draw in around $11 billion every year for the organization. Its coaches and administrators make staggering amounts of money. From high salaries to performance bonuses, it seems that the NCAA is a very profitable business considering it is a non-profit organization.

    There has been major discussion recently if college athletes should or shouldn''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t be paid while they are in school. The first thing opponents say is, "They''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''re already getting a scholarship! That''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s more than anybody else! Don''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t be greedy!"

    Fine, let''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s not be greedy and look at how much a scholarship is actually worth. On average, a full Division 1 scholarship is $25,000 per year.

    Burton, Richard. “College Athletes Are Already Paid With Their Education.” US News. U.S.News & World Report, 2 Apr. 2013. Web. 30 Apr. 2013.

    Johnson, Dennis A., and John Acquaviva. “Point/Counterpoint: Paying College Athletes.” The Sport Journal. United States Sports Academy, 2012. Web. 30 Apr. 2013.

    What has continued to be one of the most pressing issues in the world of sports today has now become a matter the NCAA can no longer afford to ignore. The service that college athletes provide to the institutions they attend in addition to millions of spectators all over the world is still not being rewarded in the manner that it should be for their above-average dedication, work ethic and most importantly, money brought in to their employer.

    The NCAA is a multi-billion dollar industry that generated over $845 billion last year due to their players’ ability to entertain and perform to their fullest extent at all times. So with all of this money flowing in why wouldn’t they provide their athletes a stipend?

    Joe Nocera is an Op-Ed columnist for The Times and the co-author of “All the Devils Are Here: The Hidden History of the Financial Crisis.”

  6. author
    сахаронни  🍓 ( 🌹) 18 Jan 2017 05:29

    When the NCAA was founded by President Roosevelt in 1905, the institution was committed to the idea of not providing a salary or stipend to the student-athletes who took part in its organization. It is based on the idea of amateurism, and this was a notable idea at the time.

    But, over a century later, the NCAA is no longer recognizable compared to what the organization used to be. The NCAA has modernized to take full advantage of the new kinds of sports fans and especially the new kinds of media. Today, sports and athletics in the NCAA draw in around $11 billion every year for the organization. Its coaches and administrators make staggering amounts of money. From high salaries to performance bonuses, it seems that the NCAA is a very profitable business considering it is a non-profit organization.

    There has been major discussion recently if college athletes should or shouldn''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t be paid while they are in school. The first thing opponents say is, "They''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''re already getting a scholarship! That''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s more than anybody else! Don''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t be greedy!"

    Fine, let''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s not be greedy and look at how much a scholarship is actually worth. On average, a full Division 1 scholarship is $25,000 per year.

    Burton, Richard. “College Athletes Are Already Paid With Their Education.” US News. U.S.News & World Report, 2 Apr. 2013. Web. 30 Apr. 2013.

    Johnson, Dennis A., and John Acquaviva. “Point/Counterpoint: Paying College Athletes.” The Sport Journal. United States Sports Academy, 2012. Web. 30 Apr. 2013.

    What has continued to be one of the most pressing issues in the world of sports today has now become a matter the NCAA can no longer afford to ignore. The service that college athletes provide to the institutions they attend in addition to millions of spectators all over the world is still not being rewarded in the manner that it should be for their above-average dedication, work ethic and most importantly, money brought in to their employer.

    The NCAA is a multi-billion dollar industry that generated over $845 billion last year due to their players’ ability to entertain and perform to their fullest extent at all times. So with all of this money flowing in why wouldn’t they provide their athletes a stipend?

    Joe Nocera is an Op-Ed columnist for The Times and the co-author of “All the Devils Are Here: The Hidden History of the Financial Crisis.”

  7. author
    User1487890824 18 Jan 2017 00:28

    IDK it really depends on your school whether you will owe them money or not. At my university you can get a full refund within like a week after school starts. Although I had a friend who got all of his money back after leaving school with only a month left in the semester. But he had some big issues so the school had sympathy for him. Is the college experience for everyone? Yes. You can deal with your issues by changing a routine or just doing something different at your school. Anyone can be happy anywhere, it is just a matter of if they want to be happy or not. It is all in the mindset of the individual.

  8. author
    User1487808237 18 Jan 2017 08:43

    When the NCAA was founded by President Roosevelt in 1905, the institution was committed to the idea of not providing a salary or stipend to the student-athletes who took part in its organization. It is based on the idea of amateurism, and this was a notable idea at the time.

    But, over a century later, the NCAA is no longer recognizable compared to what the organization used to be. The NCAA has modernized to take full advantage of the new kinds of sports fans and especially the new kinds of media. Today, sports and athletics in the NCAA draw in around $11 billion every year for the organization. Its coaches and administrators make staggering amounts of money. From high salaries to performance bonuses, it seems that the NCAA is a very profitable business considering it is a non-profit organization.

    There has been major discussion recently if college athletes should or shouldn''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t be paid while they are in school. The first thing opponents say is, "They''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''re already getting a scholarship! That''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s more than anybody else! Don''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t be greedy!"

    Fine, let''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s not be greedy and look at how much a scholarship is actually worth. On average, a full Division 1 scholarship is $25,000 per year.

    Burton, Richard. “College Athletes Are Already Paid With Their Education.” US News. U.S.News & World Report, 2 Apr. 2013. Web. 30 Apr. 2013.

    Johnson, Dennis A., and John Acquaviva. “Point/Counterpoint: Paying College Athletes.” The Sport Journal. United States Sports Academy, 2012. Web. 30 Apr. 2013.

    What has continued to be one of the most pressing issues in the world of sports today has now become a matter the NCAA can no longer afford to ignore. The service that college athletes provide to the institutions they attend in addition to millions of spectators all over the world is still not being rewarded in the manner that it should be for their above-average dedication, work ethic and most importantly, money brought in to their employer.

    The NCAA is a multi-billion dollar industry that generated over $845 billion last year due to their players’ ability to entertain and perform to their fullest extent at all times. So with all of this money flowing in why wouldn’t they provide their athletes a stipend?

    Joe Nocera is an Op-Ed columnist for The Times and the co-author of “All the Devils Are Here: The Hidden History of the Financial Crisis.”

  9. author
    blackcat317 18 Jan 2017 08:47

    When the NCAA was founded by President Roosevelt in 1905, the institution was committed to the idea of not providing a salary or stipend to the student-athletes who took part in its organization. It is based on the idea of amateurism, and this was a notable idea at the time.

    But, over a century later, the NCAA is no longer recognizable compared to what the organization used to be. The NCAA has modernized to take full advantage of the new kinds of sports fans and especially the new kinds of media. Today, sports and athletics in the NCAA draw in around $11 billion every year for the organization. Its coaches and administrators make staggering amounts of money. From high salaries to performance bonuses, it seems that the NCAA is a very profitable business considering it is a non-profit organization.

    There has been major discussion recently if college athletes should or shouldn''''t be paid while they are in school. The first thing opponents say is, "They''''re already getting a scholarship! That''''s more than anybody else! Don''''t be greedy!"

    Fine, let''''s not be greedy and look at how much a scholarship is actually worth. On average, a full Division 1 scholarship is $25,000 per year.

    Burton, Richard. “College Athletes Are Already Paid With Their Education.” US News. U.S.News & World Report, 2 Apr. 2013. Web. 30 Apr. 2013.

    Johnson, Dennis A., and John Acquaviva. “Point/Counterpoint: Paying College Athletes.” The Sport Journal. United States Sports Academy, 2012. Web. 30 Apr. 2013.

  10. author
    ʎuся ^.^ 18 Jan 2017 00:40

    Over the years there have been continuing, sporadic calls for college athletes to be paid in return for what they do to generate money for their colleges.

  11. author
    User1488155045 18 Jan 2017 01:30

    You should be prepared for really having to study. If you are serious about doing well in college, then make a study schedule and simply stick with it. Also, be prepared to read a number of books and articles, as supplamentary material to what you are assigned to read in class. This will help you achieve a strong frame of reference for the subject in question and will help in setting you apart from other students. Take advantage of office hours--it s your education and you will not always have the opportunity to study with renowned scholars, so use it to your advantage. Don t be a brown-noser (profs can smell them a mile away and they don t like them), but do let them know who you are and what you re interested in. It goes a long way in securing reccomendations and getting preferential treatment at times (e.g., suppose you have a borderline grade hovering between A-/B+, if the profs knows who you are by name beacuse you ve impressed them, they are more willing to give you the benefit of the doubt and bump you up to the A-. Suppose you are really sick and you need an extension on a paper. Because they know who you are, they give you the extension no questions asked). Besides, you often learn more in a 15 minute session of office hours than you do in a whole class session. You should also expect to be in an envirnment where you must provide reasons for your claims. That you feel a certain way, or that you strongly dislike or like something, are not reasons for you to suppose your claim or belief has been adequately justified. You must give reasons to support your views--emotions, feelings, and opinions don t cut it. For this reason, I highly reccomend taking critical reasoning (even if you ve had it in high school) and logic. The reasoning tools carry over to all disciplines, not just philosophy. (And take it from someone who has taught university courses: You re not doing anyone any, especially yourself, favors by not learning how to think well.) Hook up with the students who are getting the best grades in the class. Find out what it is they are doing to get such grades and begin doing it yourself. When you do less than A work on any assignment (like a paper or test) take it to the prof (and your TA) and pester them about how you can improve your performance. Don t expect the profs to hold your hand--at all. You are responsible for your learning. It will not be like high school where, if you don t show up to class, someone s mommy gets a call. You must be responsible and self-motivated. You must be assertative with the profs. They want to be doing research and publishing books and articles--they have deadlines that are more important to them than teaching a class. So, you have to be assertative with them if you want something in particular. They will rarely offer anything to you, you must tell them what you want, and you must follow up on it until they give you a decisive answer. Whatever your major is, it would do you well to pick up a few introductory books on the subject and become intimately familiar with the material. Also, you will want to get a good grammar book or two, since the writing required at the university level should be of a significantly higher caliber than what you ve experienced in high school. Also, if you take a language (Ancient Greek, Latin, Hindi, French, so on), make sure you don t underestimate how much time is required for studying. Don t take too many units in the same semester (or quarter) that you are taking a language. It is to easy to miss just a few sessions and then to fall behind with no hope of catching up. If you do take languages, just give yourself plenty of time to study daily--and it must be daily, especially if you are taking an inflected language, such as Sanskrit, Attik Greek, Latin, German and so on. If you don t study them daily, you will simply fall behind, and you can t catch up like you can in other classes. Oh, and the year of language you took in high school is not sufficient in comparison with the way langauges are taught at the university level (unless you ve gone to a particularly strong private school). logistically: Frequently check to see that you have no holds on your record. If you do this regularly, you won t find yourself screwed out of your priority registration date because, for instance, you have a $3 library fine. Also, plan your courses wisely since not all requirements or pre-reqs are offered every semester. Avoid taking a class whose content you are interested in, if it is taught by a terrible prof.

  12. author
    whitelion625 17 Jan 2017 23:36

    When the NCAA was founded by President Roosevelt in 1905, the institution was committed to the idea of not providing a salary or stipend to the student-athletes who took part in its organization. It is based on the idea of amateurism, and this was a notable idea at the time.

    But, over a century later, the NCAA is no longer recognizable compared to what the organization used to be. The NCAA has modernized to take full advantage of the new kinds of sports fans and especially the new kinds of media. Today, sports and athletics in the NCAA draw in around $11 billion every year for the organization. Its coaches and administrators make staggering amounts of money. From high salaries to performance bonuses, it seems that the NCAA is a very profitable business considering it is a non-profit organization.

    There has been major discussion recently if college athletes should or shouldn''''''''t be paid while they are in school. The first thing opponents say is, "They''''''''re already getting a scholarship! That''''''''s more than anybody else! Don''''''''t be greedy!"

    Fine, let''''''''s not be greedy and look at how much a scholarship is actually worth. On average, a full Division 1 scholarship is $25,000 per year.

    Burton, Richard. “College Athletes Are Already Paid With Their Education.” US News. U.S.News & World Report, 2 Apr. 2013. Web. 30 Apr. 2013.

    Johnson, Dennis A., and John Acquaviva. “Point/Counterpoint: Paying College Athletes.” The Sport Journal. United States Sports Academy, 2012. Web. 30 Apr. 2013.