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Samuel Barber's world famous "Adagio for Strings": do you know from whence he derived his inspiration for it?

18 Jan 2017 21:24 | Author: brownrabbit410 | Category: Literature review on 360 degree apprisal

For String Orchestra (5-5-3-3-3).. Piano Songbooks and Sheet Music; Guitar, Bass and Folk Instruments; Educational

Comments
  1. author
    User1490086658 18 Jan 2017 08:11

    Adagio for Strings is a work by Samuel Barber , arguably his best known, arranged for string orchestra from the second movement of his String Quartet, Op. 11.

    Barber finished the arrangement in 1936, the same year that he wrote the quartet. It was performed for the first time on November 5, 1938, by Arturo Toscanini conducting the NBC Symphony Orchestra in a radio broadcast from NBC Studio 8H. Toscanini also played the piece on his South American tour with the NBC Symphony in 1940.

    The Madison Theatre presents
    Carmen – Opera by Georges Bizet
    Saturday, October 8, 2016 at 7:30 pm and
    Sunday, October 9, 2016 at 3 pm
    The Madison Theatre at Molloy College

    Obsession… Jealousy…. Revenge…. The tale of a dangerous passion set to George Bizet’s unforgettable music, the Madison Theatre presents CARMEN.

  2. author
    purpledog459 18 Jan 2017 07:35

    Dall'Abaco, Joseph (Marie Clément Ferdinand) (1710–1805) (Son of Evaristo Felice Dall'Abaco) Rondo all'Hongarese for Double Bass and Chamber Orchestra

  3. author
    purplerabbit438 18 Jan 2017 00:38

    Nobody but petr b would extend his commiserations.

  4. author
    blueleopard569 18 Jan 2017 09:02

    Most of Sorabji s works are not extremely long. Some of them are, and when you ask about how thought out they are, one obviously has to delve into the issue of organic form. When you ll read his essays, you ll see that Sorabji placed a lot of emphasis on it. That s the philosophical background. I do not agree with your conjecture that the Brahms work you mentioned is roughly 9 times thematically and/or motivically denser than Sorabji s Organ Symphony No. 2. Brahms construction and development of themes and motifs are among the densest in all "traditional" music. I won t dare to say whether Sorabji s craft is equally sophisticated in this area, but cyclic form definitely plays an important role in his music. In the years 1927-1928, the concept of a "dominant theme" starts to appear in his music. In the Second Organ Symphony (1929-1932) (which you mentioned), Sorabji introduces 16 themes in the first movement. The second movement, a set of 50 variations on a 3-minute theme, gradually reintroduces (in the last few variations) all the themes from the first movement. The third movement includes (among other things) a triple fugue, and in the strettos of the second and third sections previous material is reintroduced. This is a fairly cursory analysis, but hopefully it gives you an idea about the amount of material and architecture in Sorabji s mature large-scale works. For a scholarly analysis of a composition by him, see the following link: http://www.sorabji-archive.co.uk/articles/rubin_1.php I do not agree with petr b s claims - my rebuttals can be found at http://www.talkclassical.com, so I won t repeat them here; however, I will challenge his claim that "I haven t heard of conductors, musicologists, etc. becoming such champions of Sorabji s orchestral works." Musicologists closely associated with Sorabji s music include (among others) Paul Rapoport, Marc-André Roberge and Simon John Abrahams. His orchestral works are in a different situation; many of them are being edited, and while a few are short, those (essentially without exception) are immature pieces. Naturally, if an orchestra and choir(s) ever volunteer to perform Sorabji s 6-hour "Messa grande sinfonica" (with forces similar to those called for in Mahler 8 or Brian 1), then that will be great news. But for now, the 1,001-page manuscript is being edited. Lastly: since you mentioned Sorabji s 2nd Organ Symphony, you might like to hear that this very work will be broadcast soon on the Internet. (There will be two broadcasts - GRADUAL! - of which each will be repeated.) You can find all the relevant details at http://sorabji-archive.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=469.0. If you ever looked for a chance to get an idea of the "scrupulousness" of an exceptionally large work of Sorabji s (even by his measures), then this is one your best opportunities, given that the broadcast will be both free and available for later listening. I hope the above helps.

  5. author
    bigostrich764 18 Jan 2017 08:54

    First, train yourself to write music for 4-part harmony. Eg; string quartet. Then talk about composing for an orchestra.

  6. author
    orangedog387 18 Jan 2017 09:37

    Adagio for Strings is a work by Samuel Barber , arguably his best known, arranged for string orchestra from the second movement of his String Quartet, Op. 11.

    Barber finished the arrangement in 1936, the same year that he wrote the quartet. It was performed for the first time on November 5, 1938, by Arturo Toscanini conducting the NBC Symphony Orchestra in a radio broadcast from NBC Studio 8H. Toscanini also played the piece on his South American tour with the NBC Symphony in 1940.