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A Raisin in the Sun Quotes - Shmoop

18 Jan 2017 21:24 | Author: smallelephant104 | Category: Global history dbq essay example

This quote occurs midway through a discussion between Walter Younger and his wife Ruth. Their son Travis has gone to school and Ruth cooks breakfast for Walter. As she cooks, Walter tells Ruth that he hopes to use his deceased father’s $10,000 life insurance money to invest in a down payment on a liquor store with his friends, Willy Harris and Bobo. Ruth is wary of the investment. She doesn’t trust Willy and Bobo and continuously evades discussing the prospect of Walter using his father’s money on an investment. She finally tells him to leave her alone and he reacts with frustration at both his wife and his own position in life; a black man in the 1950’s trying to provide for his family.

This is the first time Hansberry touches on the idea of dreams and dreaming in A Raisin In The Sun,  as well as differentiates between the dreams of men and the dreams of women. This scene highlights Walter’s aspirations for wealth and thereby an escape from his family’s poor Southside Chicago life. He is filled with hope and a deep longing for financial stability. This moment also underlines Walter’s continual feeling of being out of control and at the mercy of others. He is a chauffeur for a wealthy white family, and his mother is the sole inheritor of the $10,000, and so she will ultimately have the final say. In the time-period of the play, men were expected to lead and provide for their families, so Walter, who is the only man in the family but neither the final decision-maker nor the primary breadwinner, feels emasculated. He needs dreams in order to survive and retain his dignity. Ruth on the other hand is pragmatic, as women had to be at the time. Her aspirations are less expansive. For her, survival means cooking breakfast, making sure her son gets to school and she and her husband get to work. Thus, she responds to Walter’s big dreams with the utilitarian and simple task of "eat your eggs." As a woman (particularly a black woman) in this time period, she doesn’t have room to dream the way Walter dreams.

Comments
  1. author
    User1491109574 18 Jan 2017 09:24

    Character List for The Raisin In The Sun Walter Lee Younger - The protagonist of the play. Walter is a dreamer. He wants to be rich and devises plans to acquire wealth with his friends, particularly Willy Harris. When the play opens, he wants to invest his father’s insurance money in a new liquor store venture. He spends the rest of the play endlessly preoccupied with discovering a quick solution to his family’s various problems. Walter (In-Depth Analysis) Beneatha Younger (“Bennie”) - Mama’s daughter and Walter’s sister. Beneatha is an intellectual. Twenty years old, she attends college and is better educated than the rest of the Younger family. Some of her personal beliefs and views have distanced her from conservative Mama. She dreams of being a doctor and struggles to determine her identity as a well-educated black woman. Beneatha (In-Depth Analysis) Lena Younger (“Mama”) - Walter and Beneatha’s mother. The matriarch of the family, Mama is religious, moral, and maternal. She wants to use her husband’s insurance money as a down payment on a house with a backyard to fulfill her dream for her family to move up in the world. Ruth Younger - Walter’s wife and Travis’s mother. Ruth takes care of the Youngers’ small apartment. Her marriage to Walter has problems, but she hopes to rekindle their love. She is about thirty, but her weariness makes her seem older. Constantly fighting poverty and domestic troubles, she continues to be an emotionally strong woman. Her almost pessimistic pragmatism helps her to survive. Travis Younger - Walter and Ruth’s sheltered young son. Travis earns some money by carrying grocery bags and likes to play outside with other neighborhood children, but he has no bedroom and sleeps on the living-room sofa. Joseph Asagai - A Nigerian student in love with Beneatha. Asagai, as he is often called, is very proud of his African heritage, and Beneatha hopes to learn about her African heritage from him. He eventually proposes marriage to Beneatha and hopes she will return to Nigeria with him. George Murchison - A wealthy, African-American man who courts Beneatha. The Youngers approve of George, but Beneatha dislikes his willingness to submit to white culture and forget his African heritage. He challenges the thoughts and feelings of other black people through his arrogance and flair for intellectual competition. Mr. Karl Lindner - The only white character in the play. Mr. Lindner arrives at the Youngers’ apartment from the Clybourne Park Improvement Association. He offers the Youngers a deal to reconsider moving into his (all-white) neighborhood. Bobo - One of Walter’s partners in the liquor store plan. Bobo appears to be as mentally slow as his name indicates. Willy Harris - A friend of Walter and coordinator of the liquor store plan. Willy never appears onstage, which helps keep the focus of the story on the dynamics of the Younger family. Mrs. Johnson - The Youngers’ neighbor. Mrs. Johnson takes advantage of the Youngers’ hospitality and warns them about moving into a predominately white neighborhood.

  2. author
    goldengoose889 18 Jan 2017 03:56

    Click here quotes for a raisin in the sun

    This quote occurs midway through a discussion between Walter Younger and his wife Ruth. Their son Travis has gone to school and Ruth cooks breakfast for Walter. As she cooks, Walter tells Ruth that he hopes to use his deceased father’s $10,000 life insurance money to invest in a down payment on a liquor store with his friends, Willy Harris and Bobo. Ruth is wary of the investment. She doesn’t trust Willy and Bobo and continuously evades discussing the prospect of Walter using his father’s money on an investment. She finally tells him to leave her alone and he reacts with frustration at both his wife and his own position in life; a black man in the 1950’s trying to provide for his family.

    This is the first time Hansberry touches on the idea of dreams and dreaming in A Raisin In The Sun,  as well as differentiates between the dreams of men and the dreams of women. This scene highlights Walter’s aspirations for wealth and thereby an escape from his family’s poor Southside Chicago life. He is filled with hope and a deep longing for financial stability. This moment also underlines Walter’s continual feeling of being out of control and at the mercy of others. He is a chauffeur for a wealthy white family, and his mother is the sole inheritor of the $10,000, and so she will ultimately have the final say. In the time-period of the play, men were expected to lead and provide for their families, so Walter, who is the only man in the family but neither the final decision-maker nor the primary breadwinner, feels emasculated. He needs dreams in order to survive and retain his dignity. Ruth on the other hand is pragmatic, as women had to be at the time. Her aspirations are less expansive. For her, survival means cooking breakfast, making sure her son gets to school and she and her husband get to work. Thus, she responds to Walter’s big dreams with the utilitarian and simple task of "eat your eggs." As a woman (particularly a black woman) in this time period, she doesn’t have room to dream the way Walter dreams.

  3. author
    User1490906730 18 Jan 2017 03:40

    Need help on characters in Lorraine Hansberry's A Raisin in the Sun? Check out our detailed character descriptions. From the creators of SparkNotes.

  4. author
    blueostrich750 18 Jan 2017 05:14

    This quote is Walter''''s response. He tells Ruth that her refusal to take him or his dreams seriously is the problem with “colored women in this world.” This highlights both the themes of race and gender in A Raisin In The Sun. In 1950s America, a woman’s role was to uplift and support her husband. Ruth, in her stern and outspoken manner, is the antithesis of such behavior. Walter also draws a racial comparison suggesting that white women do  behave in such a way, with the implication that it is this behavior of white women that helps white men to hold such positions of power.

    Walter is frustrated by the position of black people in society and is also making fun of his wife for not fitting into the standard gender role of "mother" and "housewife." In his own way, Walter is trying to hash out why and how upward mobility seems so hard for black men. Yet in searching for something tangible to blame—and landing on black women as the cause—he fails to see the true cause: systemic racism that restricts the opportunities of black people and in doing so degrades their sense of dignity. 

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  5. author
    Р Саша 17 Jan 2017 22:08

    This quote is Walter''''''''s response. He tells Ruth that her refusal to take him or his dreams seriously is the problem with “colored women in this world.” This highlights both the themes of race and gender in A Raisin In The Sun. In 1950s America, a woman’s role was to uplift and support her husband. Ruth, in her stern and outspoken manner, is the antithesis of such behavior. Walter also draws a racial comparison suggesting that white women do  behave in such a way, with the implication that it is this behavior of white women that helps white men to hold such positions of power.

    Walter is frustrated by the position of black people in society and is also making fun of his wife for not fitting into the standard gender role of "mother" and "housewife." In his own way, Walter is trying to hash out why and how upward mobility seems so hard for black men. Yet in searching for something tangible to blame—and landing on black women as the cause—he fails to see the true cause: systemic racism that restricts the opportunities of black people and in doing so degrades their sense of dignity. 

    You''ve already earned points for these correct answers. Try getting them all correct, or take another quiz. × You''re so close!

    You''re so close to scoring some shmoints!

  6. author
    goldenbutterfly603 18 Jan 2017 01:07

    This quote is Walter''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s response. He tells Ruth that her refusal to take him or his dreams seriously is the problem with “colored women in this world.” This highlights both the themes of race and gender in A Raisin In The Sun. In 1950s America, a woman’s role was to uplift and support her husband. Ruth, in her stern and outspoken manner, is the antithesis of such behavior. Walter also draws a racial comparison suggesting that white women do  behave in such a way, with the implication that it is this behavior of white women that helps white men to hold such positions of power.

    Walter is frustrated by the position of black people in society and is also making fun of his wife for not fitting into the standard gender role of "mother" and "housewife." In his own way, Walter is trying to hash out why and how upward mobility seems so hard for black men. Yet in searching for something tangible to blame—and landing on black women as the cause—he fails to see the true cause: systemic racism that restricts the opportunities of black people and in doing so degrades their sense of dignity. 

    You''''''''ve already earned points for these correct answers. Try getting them all correct, or take another quiz. × You''''''''re so close!

    You''''''''re so close to scoring some shmoints!

    After moving to Chicago's South Side in the 1950s, a black family struggles to deal with poverty, racism, and inner conflict as they strive for a better life. Adapted for the screen from Lorraine Hansberry's play, this is a moving portrait of dreams deferred. Written by Anonymous

    Find showtimes, watch trailers, browse photos, track your Watchlist and rate your favorite movies and TV shows on your phone or tablet!

  7. author
    brownbear908 18 Jan 2017 08:47

    This quote is Walter''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s response. He tells Ruth that her refusal to take him or his dreams seriously is the problem with “colored women in this world.” This highlights both the themes of race and gender in A Raisin In The Sun. In 1950s America, a woman’s role was to uplift and support her husband. Ruth, in her stern and outspoken manner, is the antithesis of such behavior. Walter also draws a racial comparison suggesting that white women do  behave in such a way, with the implication that it is this behavior of white women that helps white men to hold such positions of power.

    Walter is frustrated by the position of black people in society and is also making fun of his wife for not fitting into the standard gender role of "mother" and "housewife." In his own way, Walter is trying to hash out why and how upward mobility seems so hard for black men. Yet in searching for something tangible to blame—and landing on black women as the cause—he fails to see the true cause: systemic racism that restricts the opportunities of black people and in doing so degrades their sense of dignity. 

    You''''''''''''''''ve already earned points for these correct answers. Try getting them all correct, or take another quiz. × You''''''''''''''''re so close!

    You''''''''''''''''re so close to scoring some shmoints!

    After moving to Chicago''s South Side in the 1950s, a black family struggles to deal with poverty, racism, and inner conflict as they strive for a better life. Adapted for the screen from Lorraine Hansberry''s play, this is a moving portrait of dreams deferred. Written by Anonymous

    Find showtimes, watch trailers, browse photos, track your Watchlist and rate your favorite movies and TV shows on your phone or tablet!

    An African-American family struggles with poverty, racism, and inner conflict as they strive for a better way of life. Based on the play by Lorraine Hansberry.

    A blind, uneducated white girl is befriended by a black man, who becomes determined to help her escape her impoverished and abusive home life.

  8. author
    redswan932 18 Jan 2017 03:20

    Your theme is definitely a good one. ;) Maybe you could start by looking up and quoting the original Langston Hughes poem for A Raisin in the Sun. Before you write your essay, I would make a list of the characters and what their dreams are. Then figure out how the dreams were deferred and why. Was there anyone that got what they wanted? Did anyone lose hope in their dream after a while? After you make this list, you will be able to see things in common with all of the characters. You will be able to use this in your introduction. For example, maybe they all lost hope after a while (I don t know if this is true, I just made it up). Also consider your own personal experience with dreams that you have had deferred (that you ve lost or someone ruined or delayed). Relate your experiences to the characters experiences (briefly, don t tell your whole life story) in the introduction.

  9. author
    tinycat603 17 Jan 2017 23:14

    This quote is Walter''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s response. He tells Ruth that her refusal to take him or his dreams seriously is the problem with “colored women in this world.” This highlights both the themes of race and gender in A Raisin In The Sun. In 1950s America, a woman’s role was to uplift and support her husband. Ruth, in her stern and outspoken manner, is the antithesis of such behavior. Walter also draws a racial comparison suggesting that white women do  behave in such a way, with the implication that it is this behavior of white women that helps white men to hold such positions of power.

    Walter is frustrated by the position of black people in society and is also making fun of his wife for not fitting into the standard gender role of "mother" and "housewife." In his own way, Walter is trying to hash out why and how upward mobility seems so hard for black men. Yet in searching for something tangible to blame—and landing on black women as the cause—he fails to see the true cause: systemic racism that restricts the opportunities of black people and in doing so degrades their sense of dignity. 

    You''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''ve already earned points for these correct answers. Try getting them all correct, or take another quiz. × You''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''re so close!

    You''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''re so close to scoring some shmoints!

    After moving to Chicago''''s South Side in the 1950s, a black family struggles to deal with poverty, racism, and inner conflict as they strive for a better life. Adapted for the screen from Lorraine Hansberry''''s play, this is a moving portrait of dreams deferred. Written by Anonymous

    Find showtimes, watch trailers, browse photos, track your Watchlist and rate your favorite movies and TV shows on your phone or tablet!

    An African-American family struggles with poverty, racism, and inner conflict as they strive for a better way of life. Based on the play by Lorraine Hansberry.

    A blind, uneducated white girl is befriended by a black man, who becomes determined to help her escape her impoverished and abusive home life.

  10. author
    brownswan122 18 Jan 2017 02:51

    This quote is Walter''''''''''''''''s response. He tells Ruth that her refusal to take him or his dreams seriously is the problem with “colored women in this world.” This highlights both the themes of race and gender in A Raisin In The Sun. In 1950s America, a woman’s role was to uplift and support her husband. Ruth, in her stern and outspoken manner, is the antithesis of such behavior. Walter also draws a racial comparison suggesting that white women do  behave in such a way, with the implication that it is this behavior of white women that helps white men to hold such positions of power.

    Walter is frustrated by the position of black people in society and is also making fun of his wife for not fitting into the standard gender role of "mother" and "housewife." In his own way, Walter is trying to hash out why and how upward mobility seems so hard for black men. Yet in searching for something tangible to blame—and landing on black women as the cause—he fails to see the true cause: systemic racism that restricts the opportunities of black people and in doing so degrades their sense of dignity. 

    You''''ve already earned points for these correct answers. Try getting them all correct, or take another quiz. × You''''re so close!

    You''''re so close to scoring some shmoints!

  11. author
    blackbird630 18 Jan 2017 08:07

    This quote is Walter''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s response. He tells Ruth that her refusal to take him or his dreams seriously is the problem with “colored women in this world.” This highlights both the themes of race and gender in A Raisin In The Sun. In 1950s America, a woman’s role was to uplift and support her husband. Ruth, in her stern and outspoken manner, is the antithesis of such behavior. Walter also draws a racial comparison suggesting that white women do  behave in such a way, with the implication that it is this behavior of white women that helps white men to hold such positions of power.

    Walter is frustrated by the position of black people in society and is also making fun of his wife for not fitting into the standard gender role of "mother" and "housewife." In his own way, Walter is trying to hash out why and how upward mobility seems so hard for black men. Yet in searching for something tangible to blame—and landing on black women as the cause—he fails to see the true cause: systemic racism that restricts the opportunities of black people and in doing so degrades their sense of dignity. 

    You''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''ve already earned points for these correct answers. Try getting them all correct, or take another quiz. × You''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''re so close!

    You''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''re so close to scoring some shmoints!

    After moving to Chicago''''''''''''''''s South Side in the 1950s, a black family struggles to deal with poverty, racism, and inner conflict as they strive for a better life. Adapted for the screen from Lorraine Hansberry''''''''''''''''s play, this is a moving portrait of dreams deferred. Written by Anonymous

    Find showtimes, watch trailers, browse photos, track your Watchlist and rate your favorite movies and TV shows on your phone or tablet!

    An African-American family struggles with poverty, racism, and inner conflict as they strive for a better way of life. Based on the play by Lorraine Hansberry.

    A blind, uneducated white girl is befriended by a black man, who becomes determined to help her escape her impoverished and abusive home life.

  12. author
    User1489874742 18 Jan 2017 08:54

    This quote is Walter''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s response. He tells Ruth that her refusal to take him or his dreams seriously is the problem with “colored women in this world.” This highlights both the themes of race and gender in A Raisin In The Sun. In 1950s America, a woman’s role was to uplift and support her husband. Ruth, in her stern and outspoken manner, is the antithesis of such behavior. Walter also draws a racial comparison suggesting that white women do  behave in such a way, with the implication that it is this behavior of white women that helps white men to hold such positions of power.

    Walter is frustrated by the position of black people in society and is also making fun of his wife for not fitting into the standard gender role of "mother" and "housewife." In his own way, Walter is trying to hash out why and how upward mobility seems so hard for black men. Yet in searching for something tangible to blame—and landing on black women as the cause—he fails to see the true cause: systemic racism that restricts the opportunities of black people and in doing so degrades their sense of dignity. 

    You''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''ve already earned points for these correct answers. Try getting them all correct, or take another quiz. × You''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''re so close!

    You''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''re so close to scoring some shmoints!

    After moving to Chicago''''''''s South Side in the 1950s, a black family struggles to deal with poverty, racism, and inner conflict as they strive for a better life. Adapted for the screen from Lorraine Hansberry''''''''s play, this is a moving portrait of dreams deferred. Written by Anonymous

    Find showtimes, watch trailers, browse photos, track your Watchlist and rate your favorite movies and TV shows on your phone or tablet!

    An African-American family struggles with poverty, racism, and inner conflict as they strive for a better way of life. Based on the play by Lorraine Hansberry.

    A blind, uneducated white girl is befriended by a black man, who becomes determined to help her escape her impoverished and abusive home life.