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18 Jan 2017 21:24 | Author: User1490079112 | Category: Lake region electric cooperative essay contest

Using a resource means dispersing it. When we quarry limestone and send it off to build public monuments, or when we mine coal and burn it to drive turbines, we are making use of a concentrated resource, and dispersing it. A large, continuous mass of limestone winds up as a number of discrete blocks spread around in different locations; and coal, after briefly giving off heat and light, becomes a small amount of ash and a large amount of gas. Resources may be temporarily accumulated in a stockpile, but their actual use always results in dispersal.

Comments
  1. author
    User1489772610 18 Jan 2017 00:09

    The science of wealth and poverty is called Economics. But on the key question of whether human progress tends to reduce world poverty, tends to increase world.

  2. author
    heavyrabbit279 18 Jan 2017 04:12

    The book An Essay on the Principle of Population was first published anonymously in 1798, [1] [2] but the author was soon identified as Thomas Robert Malthus. The book predicted a grim future, as population would increase geometrically, doubling every 25 years, [3] but food production would only grow arithmetically, which would result in famine and starvation, unless births were controlled. [3]

    A key portion of the book was dedicated to what is now known as Malthus'''''''''''''''' Iron Law of Population. This name itself is retrospective, based on the iron law of wages , which is the reformulation of Malthus'''''''''''''''' position by Ferdinand Lassalle , who in turn derived the name from Goethe ''''''''''''''''s "great, eternal iron laws" in Das Göttliche. [4] This theory suggested that growing population rates would contribute to a rising supply of labour that would inevitably lower wages. In essence, Malthus feared that continued population growth would lend itself to poverty and famine.

    Human population planning is the practice of intentionally managing the rate of growth of a human population. Historically human population planning has been implemented with the goal of increasing the rate of human population growth. However, in the period from the 1950s to the 1980s, concerns about global population growth and its effects on poverty , environmental degradation and political stability led to efforts to reduce human population growth rates. More recently, some countries, such as Iran and Spain, have begun efforts to increase their birth rates once again.

    While population planning can involve measures that improve people''''s lives by giving them greater control of their reproduction, a few programs, most notably the Chinese government''''s " one-child policy ", have resorted to coercive measures.

    Using a resource means dispersing it. When we quarry limestone and send it off to build public monuments, or when we mine coal and burn it to drive turbines, we are making use of a concentrated resource, and dispersing it. A large, continuous mass of limestone winds up as a number of discrete blocks spread around in different locations; and coal, after briefly giving off heat and light, becomes a small amount of ash and a large amount of gas. Resources may be temporarily accumulated in a stockpile, but their actual use always results in dispersal.

  3. author
    crazyduck342 18 Jan 2017 02:44

    The book An Essay on the Principle of Population was first published anonymously in 1798, [1] [2] but the author was soon identified as Thomas Robert Malthus. The book predicted a grim future, as population would increase geometrically, doubling every 25 years, [3] but food production would only grow arithmetically, which would result in famine and starvation, unless births were controlled. [3]

    A key portion of the book was dedicated to what is now known as Malthus'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''' Iron Law of Population. This name itself is retrospective, based on the iron law of wages , which is the reformulation of Malthus'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''' position by Ferdinand Lassalle , who in turn derived the name from Goethe ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s "great, eternal iron laws" in Das Göttliche. [4] This theory suggested that growing population rates would contribute to a rising supply of labour that would inevitably lower wages. In essence, Malthus feared that continued population growth would lend itself to poverty and famine.

    Human population planning is the practice of intentionally managing the rate of growth of a human population. Historically human population planning has been implemented with the goal of increasing the rate of human population growth. However, in the period from the 1950s to the 1980s, concerns about global population growth and its effects on poverty , environmental degradation and political stability led to efforts to reduce human population growth rates. More recently, some countries, such as Iran and Spain, have begun efforts to increase their birth rates once again.

    While population planning can involve measures that improve people''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s lives by giving them greater control of their reproduction, a few programs, most notably the Chinese government''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s " one-child policy ", have resorted to coercive measures.

    Using a resource means dispersing it. When we quarry limestone and send it off to build public monuments, or when we mine coal and burn it to drive turbines, we are making use of a concentrated resource, and dispersing it. A large, continuous mass of limestone winds up as a number of discrete blocks spread around in different locations; and coal, after briefly giving off heat and light, becomes a small amount of ash and a large amount of gas. Resources may be temporarily accumulated in a stockpile, but their actual use always results in dispersal.

    Subscribe : RSS | Join Email List


    Your gift helps publish and distribute materials like this. Download a PDF of this release here. New NPG Forum Paper Maps the Removal of Population Issue from Environmental Movement Report follows the Earth Day and U.S. conservation movement’s abandonment of overpopulation and immigration as major environmental threats. Alexandria, VA – In commemoration of Earth Day 2017 […]

    New studies add to the growing body of research on the toll U.S. mass incarceration is taking on prisoner’s children and families. Three recent articles in the journal Demography document the spillover effects of the prison boom on family poverty, couples’ relationship stability, and child well-being.

    An African Union (AU) Assembly decision in January 2016 established the theme for 2017 as “Harnessing the Demographic Dividend Through Investments in Youth.” AU heads of state and government recognize a country-level demographic dividend as central to the continent’s economic transformation in the context of AU Agenda 2063—the AU’s global strategy for socioeconomic transformation within the next 50 years.

    I am simply interested to know the population at hte year 1 AD and the basis of this projection. would you please be kind to narrate in simplest term.

    “The greatest danger to our planet is that we lose hope – especially if our youth loses hope. Because, if we have no hope, we give up and stop trying to do our bit to make a difference.” Dr. Jane Goodall

  4. author
    greenelephant708 18 Jan 2017 01:06

    The book An Essay on the Principle of Population was first published anonymously in 1798, [1] [2] but the author was soon identified as Thomas Robert Malthus. The book predicted a grim future, as population would increase geometrically, doubling every 25 years, [3] but food production would only grow arithmetically, which would result in famine and starvation, unless births were controlled. [3]

    A key portion of the book was dedicated to what is now known as Malthus'''''''' Iron Law of Population. This name itself is retrospective, based on the iron law of wages , which is the reformulation of Malthus'''''''' position by Ferdinand Lassalle , who in turn derived the name from Goethe ''''''''s "great, eternal iron laws" in Das Göttliche. [4] This theory suggested that growing population rates would contribute to a rising supply of labour that would inevitably lower wages. In essence, Malthus feared that continued population growth would lend itself to poverty and famine.

    Human population planning is the practice of intentionally managing the rate of growth of a human population. Historically human population planning has been implemented with the goal of increasing the rate of human population growth. However, in the period from the 1950s to the 1980s, concerns about global population growth and its effects on poverty , environmental degradation and political stability led to efforts to reduce human population growth rates. More recently, some countries, such as Iran and Spain, have begun efforts to increase their birth rates once again.

    While population planning can involve measures that improve people''s lives by giving them greater control of their reproduction, a few programs, most notably the Chinese government''s " one-child policy ", have resorted to coercive measures.

  5. author
    что тут у нас 18 Jan 2017 01:01

    The human population *is* a "natural" population. We are a product of nature just as surely as bugs or trees. Ecologists who study population size use various models for population growth, such as the exponential growth curve and the "S-curve". The exponential growth curve can be observed in many animal and bacterial populations. It usually results in a population crash when resources are exhausted. Ever since Malthus, people have been predicting a crash or at least a leveling off in the growth of earth s human population. It s still a pretty good prediction in the long run - we just don t know when. So far, human ingenuity has found new resources to exploit and better ways to exploit those resources. But depletion of oil, land, water, etc. *and* pollution of the atmosphere with CO2 make if pretty likely that growth in human population will change soon (certainly within the next 50-100 yrs). The real question is whether human ingenuity and foresight can keep if from being a crash.

  6. author
    ticklishsnake592 18 Jan 2017 03:38

    The book An Essay on the Principle of Population was first published anonymously in 1798, [1] [2] but the author was soon identified as Thomas Robert Malthus. The book predicted a grim future, as population would increase geometrically, doubling every 25 years, [3] but food production would only grow arithmetically, which would result in famine and starvation, unless births were controlled. [3]

    A key portion of the book was dedicated to what is now known as Malthus'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''' Iron Law of Population. This name itself is retrospective, based on the iron law of wages , which is the reformulation of Malthus'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''' position by Ferdinand Lassalle , who in turn derived the name from Goethe ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s "great, eternal iron laws" in Das Göttliche. [4] This theory suggested that growing population rates would contribute to a rising supply of labour that would inevitably lower wages. In essence, Malthus feared that continued population growth would lend itself to poverty and famine.

    Human population planning is the practice of intentionally managing the rate of growth of a human population. Historically human population planning has been implemented with the goal of increasing the rate of human population growth. However, in the period from the 1950s to the 1980s, concerns about global population growth and its effects on poverty , environmental degradation and political stability led to efforts to reduce human population growth rates. More recently, some countries, such as Iran and Spain, have begun efforts to increase their birth rates once again.

    While population planning can involve measures that improve people''''''''s lives by giving them greater control of their reproduction, a few programs, most notably the Chinese government''''''''s " one-child policy ", have resorted to coercive measures.

    Using a resource means dispersing it. When we quarry limestone and send it off to build public monuments, or when we mine coal and burn it to drive turbines, we are making use of a concentrated resource, and dispersing it. A large, continuous mass of limestone winds up as a number of discrete blocks spread around in different locations; and coal, after briefly giving off heat and light, becomes a small amount of ash and a large amount of gas. Resources may be temporarily accumulated in a stockpile, but their actual use always results in dispersal.

    Subscribe : RSS | Join Email List


    Your gift helps publish and distribute materials like this. Download a PDF of this release here. New NPG Forum Paper Maps the Removal of Population Issue from Environmental Movement Report follows the Earth Day and U.S. conservation movement’s abandonment of overpopulation and immigration as major environmental threats. Alexandria, VA – In commemoration of Earth Day 2017 […]

  7. author
    heavypeacock862 18 Jan 2017 04:44

    The book An Essay on the Principle of Population was first published anonymously in 1798, [1] [2] but the author was soon identified as Thomas Robert Malthus. The book predicted a grim future, as population would increase geometrically, doubling every 25 years, [3] but food production would only grow arithmetically, which would result in famine and starvation, unless births were controlled. [3]

    A key portion of the book was dedicated to what is now known as Malthus'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''' Iron Law of Population. This name itself is retrospective, based on the iron law of wages , which is the reformulation of Malthus'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''' position by Ferdinand Lassalle , who in turn derived the name from Goethe ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s "great, eternal iron laws" in Das Göttliche. [4] This theory suggested that growing population rates would contribute to a rising supply of labour that would inevitably lower wages. In essence, Malthus feared that continued population growth would lend itself to poverty and famine.

    Human population planning is the practice of intentionally managing the rate of growth of a human population. Historically human population planning has been implemented with the goal of increasing the rate of human population growth. However, in the period from the 1950s to the 1980s, concerns about global population growth and its effects on poverty , environmental degradation and political stability led to efforts to reduce human population growth rates. More recently, some countries, such as Iran and Spain, have begun efforts to increase their birth rates once again.

    While population planning can involve measures that improve people''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s lives by giving them greater control of their reproduction, a few programs, most notably the Chinese government''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s " one-child policy ", have resorted to coercive measures.

    Using a resource means dispersing it. When we quarry limestone and send it off to build public monuments, or when we mine coal and burn it to drive turbines, we are making use of a concentrated resource, and dispersing it. A large, continuous mass of limestone winds up as a number of discrete blocks spread around in different locations; and coal, after briefly giving off heat and light, becomes a small amount of ash and a large amount of gas. Resources may be temporarily accumulated in a stockpile, but their actual use always results in dispersal.

    Subscribe : RSS | Join Email List


    Your gift helps publish and distribute materials like this. Download a PDF of this release here. New NPG Forum Paper Maps the Removal of Population Issue from Environmental Movement Report follows the Earth Day and U.S. conservation movement’s abandonment of overpopulation and immigration as major environmental threats. Alexandria, VA – In commemoration of Earth Day 2017 […]

    New studies add to the growing body of research on the toll U.S. mass incarceration is taking on prisoner’s children and families. Three recent articles in the journal Demography document the spillover effects of the prison boom on family poverty, couples’ relationship stability, and child well-being.

    An African Union (AU) Assembly decision in January 2016 established the theme for 2017 as “Harnessing the Demographic Dividend Through Investments in Youth.” AU heads of state and government recognize a country-level demographic dividend as central to the continent’s economic transformation in the context of AU Agenda 2063—the AU’s global strategy for socioeconomic transformation within the next 50 years.

  8. author
    User1489111365 18 Jan 2017 05:27

    Order essay here population as a human resource essay

    Using a resource means dispersing it. When we quarry limestone and send it off to build public monuments, or when we mine coal and burn it to drive turbines, we are making use of a concentrated resource, and dispersing it. A large, continuous mass of limestone winds up as a number of discrete blocks spread around in different locations; and coal, after briefly giving off heat and light, becomes a small amount of ash and a large amount of gas. Resources may be temporarily accumulated in a stockpile, but their actual use always results in dispersal.

  9. author
    crazyswan655 18 Jan 2017 03:40

    The book An Essay on the Principle of Population was first published anonymously in 1798, [1] [2] but the author was soon identified as Thomas Robert Malthus. The book predicted a grim future, as population would increase geometrically, doubling every 25 years, [3] but food production would only grow arithmetically, which would result in famine and starvation, unless births were controlled. [3]

    A key portion of the book was dedicated to what is now known as Malthus'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''' Iron Law of Population. This name itself is retrospective, based on the iron law of wages , which is the reformulation of Malthus'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''' position by Ferdinand Lassalle , who in turn derived the name from Goethe ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s "great, eternal iron laws" in Das Göttliche. [4] This theory suggested that growing population rates would contribute to a rising supply of labour that would inevitably lower wages. In essence, Malthus feared that continued population growth would lend itself to poverty and famine.

    Human population planning is the practice of intentionally managing the rate of growth of a human population. Historically human population planning has been implemented with the goal of increasing the rate of human population growth. However, in the period from the 1950s to the 1980s, concerns about global population growth and its effects on poverty , environmental degradation and political stability led to efforts to reduce human population growth rates. More recently, some countries, such as Iran and Spain, have begun efforts to increase their birth rates once again.

    While population planning can involve measures that improve people''''''''''''''''s lives by giving them greater control of their reproduction, a few programs, most notably the Chinese government''''''''''''''''s " one-child policy ", have resorted to coercive measures.

    Using a resource means dispersing it. When we quarry limestone and send it off to build public monuments, or when we mine coal and burn it to drive turbines, we are making use of a concentrated resource, and dispersing it. A large, continuous mass of limestone winds up as a number of discrete blocks spread around in different locations; and coal, after briefly giving off heat and light, becomes a small amount of ash and a large amount of gas. Resources may be temporarily accumulated in a stockpile, but their actual use always results in dispersal.

    Subscribe : RSS | Join Email List


    Your gift helps publish and distribute materials like this. Download a PDF of this release here. New NPG Forum Paper Maps the Removal of Population Issue from Environmental Movement Report follows the Earth Day and U.S. conservation movement’s abandonment of overpopulation and immigration as major environmental threats. Alexandria, VA – In commemoration of Earth Day 2017 […]

    New studies add to the growing body of research on the toll U.S. mass incarceration is taking on prisoner’s children and families. Three recent articles in the journal Demography document the spillover effects of the prison boom on family poverty, couples’ relationship stability, and child well-being.

    An African Union (AU) Assembly decision in January 2016 established the theme for 2017 as “Harnessing the Demographic Dividend Through Investments in Youth.” AU heads of state and government recognize a country-level demographic dividend as central to the continent’s economic transformation in the context of AU Agenda 2063—the AU’s global strategy for socioeconomic transformation within the next 50 years.

  10. author
    bluebear889 18 Jan 2017 01:19

    The book An Essay on the Principle of Population was first published anonymously in 1798, [1] [2] but the author was soon identified as Thomas Robert Malthus. The book predicted a grim future, as population would increase geometrically, doubling every 25 years, [3] but food production would only grow arithmetically, which would result in famine and starvation, unless births were controlled. [3]

    A key portion of the book was dedicated to what is now known as Malthus'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''' Iron Law of Population. This name itself is retrospective, based on the iron law of wages , which is the reformulation of Malthus'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''' position by Ferdinand Lassalle , who in turn derived the name from Goethe ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s "great, eternal iron laws" in Das Göttliche. [4] This theory suggested that growing population rates would contribute to a rising supply of labour that would inevitably lower wages. In essence, Malthus feared that continued population growth would lend itself to poverty and famine.

    Human population planning is the practice of intentionally managing the rate of growth of a human population. Historically human population planning has been implemented with the goal of increasing the rate of human population growth. However, in the period from the 1950s to the 1980s, concerns about global population growth and its effects on poverty , environmental degradation and political stability led to efforts to reduce human population growth rates. More recently, some countries, such as Iran and Spain, have begun efforts to increase their birth rates once again.

    While population planning can involve measures that improve people''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s lives by giving them greater control of their reproduction, a few programs, most notably the Chinese government''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s " one-child policy ", have resorted to coercive measures.

    Using a resource means dispersing it. When we quarry limestone and send it off to build public monuments, or when we mine coal and burn it to drive turbines, we are making use of a concentrated resource, and dispersing it. A large, continuous mass of limestone winds up as a number of discrete blocks spread around in different locations; and coal, after briefly giving off heat and light, becomes a small amount of ash and a large amount of gas. Resources may be temporarily accumulated in a stockpile, but their actual use always results in dispersal.

    Subscribe : RSS | Join Email List


    Your gift helps publish and distribute materials like this. Download a PDF of this release here. New NPG Forum Paper Maps the Removal of Population Issue from Environmental Movement Report follows the Earth Day and U.S. conservation movement’s abandonment of overpopulation and immigration as major environmental threats. Alexandria, VA – In commemoration of Earth Day 2017 […]

    New studies add to the growing body of research on the toll U.S. mass incarceration is taking on prisoner’s children and families. Three recent articles in the journal Demography document the spillover effects of the prison boom on family poverty, couples’ relationship stability, and child well-being.

    An African Union (AU) Assembly decision in January 2016 established the theme for 2017 as “Harnessing the Demographic Dividend Through Investments in Youth.” AU heads of state and government recognize a country-level demographic dividend as central to the continent’s economic transformation in the context of AU Agenda 2063—the AU’s global strategy for socioeconomic transformation within the next 50 years.

    I am simply interested to know the population at hte year 1 AD and the basis of this projection. would you please be kind to narrate in simplest term.

    “The greatest danger to our planet is that we lose hope – especially if our youth loses hope. Because, if we have no hope, we give up and stop trying to do our bit to make a difference.” Dr. Jane Goodall

    Thomas Robert Malthus was the first economist to propose a systematic theory of population. He articulated his views regarding population in his famous book, Essay on the Principle of Population (1798), for which he collected empirical data to support his thesis. Malthus had the second edition of his book published in 1803, in which he modified some of his views from the first edition, but essentially his original thesis did not change.

  11. author
    А Н А С Т А С И Я 18 Jan 2017 03:37

    The book An Essay on the Principle of Population was first published anonymously in 1798, [1] [2] but the author was soon identified as Thomas Robert Malthus. The book predicted a grim future, as population would increase geometrically, doubling every 25 years, [3] but food production would only grow arithmetically, which would result in famine and starvation, unless births were controlled. [3]

    A key portion of the book was dedicated to what is now known as Malthus'''' Iron Law of Population. This name itself is retrospective, based on the iron law of wages , which is the reformulation of Malthus'''' position by Ferdinand Lassalle , who in turn derived the name from Goethe ''''s "great, eternal iron laws" in Das Göttliche. [4] This theory suggested that growing population rates would contribute to a rising supply of labour that would inevitably lower wages. In essence, Malthus feared that continued population growth would lend itself to poverty and famine.

    Human population planning is the practice of intentionally managing the rate of growth of a human population. Historically human population planning has been implemented with the goal of increasing the rate of human population growth. However, in the period from the 1950s to the 1980s, concerns about global population growth and its effects on poverty , environmental degradation and political stability led to efforts to reduce human population growth rates. More recently, some countries, such as Iran and Spain, have begun efforts to increase their birth rates once again.

    While population planning can involve measures that improve people's lives by giving them greater control of their reproduction, a few programs, most notably the Chinese government's " one-child policy ", have resorted to coercive measures.

  12. author
    blackbird976 18 Jan 2017 07:06

    Yes. Look at what we do to each other throughout or history.

  13. author
    beautifulbutterfly405 18 Jan 2017 09:04

    NO energy transfer is well understood ; heat , food, electric and mechanical energy etc. can all be calculated like changing money from one currency to another. until the mid 1800s almost all energy came from human muscle power which came from food grown in sun light. all wealth was the extra work produced by the slaves humans need about 150 or so watts of life power (2,000 calories of food) and can eat extra and do 1-200 watts of work. multiply by hours worked to get energy today in america we use roughly 10,000 watts ( ten kilowatts) per person. 24 hours a day counting factories etc. as a very rough estimate we would need 100 (energy slaves) for each man woman and child in America to live at the same standard. but then who would provide for the slaves? people in the third world sill rely on food for muscle work the Matrix is FICTION and is based on a world of illusion ask your teacher how to calculate power and energy. they should have enough science knowledge to explain but maybe not tell your teacher to e-m me (icon) for discussion