12

Of Mice and Men Summary - eNotes.com

18 Jan 2017 21:24 | Author: User1492103085 | Category: Bodycare business plan

This free English Literature essay on Essay: John Steinbeck - Of Mice and Men is perfect for English Literature students to use as an example.

Comments
  1. author
    whiteleopard783 18 Jan 2017 07:09

    Lennie and George are migrant workers during the Great Depression. When the novel opens, they''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''re on their way to work on a ranch in Salinas, California. Instead of going straight to the ranch, they camp by the river for the night and talk about their dream of one day having their own ranch.

    Overview Summary of the Novel
    Before reporting for work, migrant workers George Milton and Lennie Small spend the night on a peaceful riverbank. For the second time, George has to take away a dead mouse that Lennie has been petting. He consoles Lennie by recounting the story of their dream farm where Lennie will tend rabbits.

    Adults can''''''''''''''''t decide if they want to require you to read John Steinbeck ''''''''''''''''s Of Mice and Men —or make that sure you never even pick it up. Since it was published in 1937, it''''''''''''''''s been banned about as often as it''''''''''''''''s been assigned.

    Why? Take your pick, really. Killing. Violence. Swearing. Brothels. Racism. Sexism. The book''''''''''''''''s ending is beyond sad, and might be considered an endorsement of euthanasia. Not to mention, its message isn''''''''''''''''t exactly full of praise for the American way of life.

    This chapter takes place the next night, while all of the men are off at the whorehouse spending their weeks pay except for the feeble threesome of Crooks , Candy and Lennie. The setting is the little shed that leaned off the wall of the barn (73) that makes up Crooks quarters. Steinbeck gives us a glimpse at the quiet, neat, lonesome life of the black stable buck. While Crooks is belittled and ordered around in the ranch at large, in his bunk he is sovereign; none of the other workers impede upon his living space.

    Candy comes by looking for Lennie and Crooks is secretly pleased that after so many years of solitude he is finally part of a sort of social gathering. They continue to discuss their plan to buy a farm and Crooks begins to warm to the scheme, even offering his own money and services if they ll take him on as well.

    If one theme can be thought of as defining the plot and symbolism of Of Mice and Men , that theme is loneliness. In many ways, from the outspoken to the subtle (such as Steinbeck s decision to set the novel near Soledad, California, a town name that means solitude in Spanish), the presence of loneliness defines the actions of the diverse characters in the book.

    The itinerant farm worker of the Great Depression found it nearly impossible to establish a fixed home. These men were forced to wander from ranch to ranch seeking temporary employment, to live in bunk houses with strangers, and to suffer the abuses of arbitrary bosses. George sums up the misery of this situation at several points during his monologues to Lennie - Guys like us, that work on ranches, are the loneliest guys in the world. They got no family. They don t belong no place (15).

  2. author
    yellowbear851 18 Jan 2017 00:05

    1.Of Mice and Men has an allegorical quality, with each character possessing a specific trait that represents something or some group in society. Interpreted closely, the book could read as a heavy-handed treatise about people’s chief wrongs against each other, including ageism, racism, sexism, and discrimination against those with disabilities. Are all of these wrongs treated as equally evil? Does the author mean to create a laundry list of mankind’s bad habits? Do we then believe in the characters as real, individual people, or are they merely types/symbols? 2.The setting here is very specific. Do the events of the story only apply to this particular place and time, or can the novella be thought of as universally applying to humans everywhere? 3.Why does George have to give up the idea of the dream farm once Lennie kills Curley’s wife? Was the farm ever a real possibility? 4.How are the deaths of Candy’s dog and Lennie related? Why do the two have to die? Is it fair to draw a comparison between these two events? Are Candy’s dog’s death and Lennie’s death just different degrees of the same kind of thing? 5.Is there any character who is not the victim of prejudice? Is there any character who is not prejudiced? Given everyone’s interaction with each other, how does prejudice actually operate in the novella? Is prejudice just a codeword covering for some larger human failing and tendency towards suspicion and isolation? 6.Does George have the right to kill Lennie? Legally? Ethically? How does Steinbeck’s treatment of Lennie’s murder color the way the reader interprets the event? What does George’s action suggest about justice – within the play and in the world as a whole? 7.Why does the story begin and end in the same place? The natural world is often described as beautiful and peaceful in the book, though it’s tempered with all sorts of awful occurrences. What role does the natural world actually play in the novella? 8.How are the notions of power and shifts in power important here? Who has power and why? Are there different types of power? 9.What is Steinbeck saying about dreams? Is the book’s take-home message an inherently pessimistic one? http://www.shmoop.com/of-mice-and-men/questions.html

  3. author
    User1489262424 18 Jan 2017 04:22

    This essay has been submitted by a student. This is not an example of the work written by our professional essay writers. Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck.

  4. author
    User1489065816 18 Jan 2017 03:00

    Lennie and George are migrant workers during the Great Depression. When the novel opens, they''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''re on their way to work on a ranch in Salinas, California. Instead of going straight to the ranch, they camp by the river for the night and talk about their dream of one day having their own ranch.

    Overview Summary of the Novel
    Before reporting for work, migrant workers George Milton and Lennie Small spend the night on a peaceful riverbank. For the second time, George has to take away a dead mouse that Lennie has been petting. He consoles Lennie by recounting the story of their dream farm where Lennie will tend rabbits.

    Adults can''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t decide if they want to require you to read John Steinbeck ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s Of Mice and Men —or make that sure you never even pick it up. Since it was published in 1937, it''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s been banned about as often as it''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s been assigned.

    Why? Take your pick, really. Killing. Violence. Swearing. Brothels. Racism. Sexism. The book''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s ending is beyond sad, and might be considered an endorsement of euthanasia. Not to mention, its message isn''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t exactly full of praise for the American way of life.

    This chapter takes place the next night, while all of the men are off at the whorehouse spending their weeks pay except for the feeble threesome of Crooks , Candy and Lennie. The setting is the little shed that leaned off the wall of the barn (73) that makes up Crooks quarters. Steinbeck gives us a glimpse at the quiet, neat, lonesome life of the black stable buck. While Crooks is belittled and ordered around in the ranch at large, in his bunk he is sovereign; none of the other workers impede upon his living space.

    Candy comes by looking for Lennie and Crooks is secretly pleased that after so many years of solitude he is finally part of a sort of social gathering. They continue to discuss their plan to buy a farm and Crooks begins to warm to the scheme, even offering his own money and services if they ll take him on as well.

    If one theme can be thought of as defining the plot and symbolism of Of Mice and Men , that theme is loneliness. In many ways, from the outspoken to the subtle (such as Steinbeck s decision to set the novel near Soledad, California, a town name that means solitude in Spanish), the presence of loneliness defines the actions of the diverse characters in the book.

    The itinerant farm worker of the Great Depression found it nearly impossible to establish a fixed home. These men were forced to wander from ranch to ranch seeking temporary employment, to live in bunk houses with strangers, and to suffer the abuses of arbitrary bosses. George sums up the misery of this situation at several points during his monologues to Lennie - Guys like us, that work on ranches, are the loneliest guys in the world. They got no family. They don t belong no place (15).

    A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

    Novelguide.com is the premier free source for literary analysis on the web. We provide an educational supplement for better understanding of classic and contemporary literature. Novelguide.com is continually in the process of adding more books to the website each week. Please check back weekly to see what we have added. Please let us know if you have any suggestions or comments or would like any additional information. Thanks for checking out our website. More Details

  5. author
    User1489690681 18 Jan 2017 05:43

    Lennie and George are migrant workers during the Great Depression. When the novel opens, they''''''''''''''''re on their way to work on a ranch in Salinas, California. Instead of going straight to the ranch, they camp by the river for the night and talk about their dream of one day having their own ranch.

    Overview Summary of the Novel
    Before reporting for work, migrant workers George Milton and Lennie Small spend the night on a peaceful riverbank. For the second time, George has to take away a dead mouse that Lennie has been petting. He consoles Lennie by recounting the story of their dream farm where Lennie will tend rabbits.

    Adults can''''''''t decide if they want to require you to read John Steinbeck ''''''''s Of Mice and Men —or make that sure you never even pick it up. Since it was published in 1937, it''''''''s been banned about as often as it''''''''s been assigned.

    Why? Take your pick, really. Killing. Violence. Swearing. Brothels. Racism. Sexism. The book''''''''s ending is beyond sad, and might be considered an endorsement of euthanasia. Not to mention, its message isn''''''''t exactly full of praise for the American way of life.

    This chapter takes place the next night, while all of the men are off at the whorehouse spending their weeks pay except for the feeble threesome of Crooks , Candy and Lennie. The setting is the little shed that leaned off the wall of the barn (73) that makes up Crooks quarters. Steinbeck gives us a glimpse at the quiet, neat, lonesome life of the black stable buck. While Crooks is belittled and ordered around in the ranch at large, in his bunk he is sovereign; none of the other workers impede upon his living space.

    Candy comes by looking for Lennie and Crooks is secretly pleased that after so many years of solitude he is finally part of a sort of social gathering. They continue to discuss their plan to buy a farm and Crooks begins to warm to the scheme, even offering his own money and services if they ll take him on as well.

    If one theme can be thought of as defining the plot and symbolism of Of Mice and Men , that theme is loneliness. In many ways, from the outspoken to the subtle (such as Steinbeck s decision to set the novel near Soledad, California, a town name that means solitude in Spanish), the presence of loneliness defines the actions of the diverse characters in the book.

    The itinerant farm worker of the Great Depression found it nearly impossible to establish a fixed home. These men were forced to wander from ranch to ranch seeking temporary employment, to live in bunk houses with strangers, and to suffer the abuses of arbitrary bosses. George sums up the misery of this situation at several points during his monologues to Lennie - Guys like us, that work on ranches, are the loneliest guys in the world. They got no family. They don t belong no place (15).

  6. author
    blackgorilla697 18 Jan 2017 05:18

    Lennie and George are migrant workers during the Great Depression. When the novel opens, they''''''''re on their way to work on a ranch in Salinas, California. Instead of going straight to the ranch, they camp by the river for the night and talk about their dream of one day having their own ranch.

    Overview Summary of the Novel
    Before reporting for work, migrant workers George Milton and Lennie Small spend the night on a peaceful riverbank. For the second time, George has to take away a dead mouse that Lennie has been petting. He consoles Lennie by recounting the story of their dream farm where Lennie will tend rabbits.

    Adults can''''t decide if they want to require you to read John Steinbeck ''''s Of Mice and Men —or make that sure you never even pick it up. Since it was published in 1937, it''''s been banned about as often as it''''s been assigned.

    Why? Take your pick, really. Killing. Violence. Swearing. Brothels. Racism. Sexism. The book''''s ending is beyond sad, and might be considered an endorsement of euthanasia. Not to mention, its message isn''''t exactly full of praise for the American way of life.

    This chapter takes place the next night, while all of the men are off at the whorehouse spending their weeks pay except for the feeble threesome of Crooks , Candy and Lennie. The setting is the little shed that leaned off the wall of the barn (73) that makes up Crooks quarters. Steinbeck gives us a glimpse at the quiet, neat, lonesome life of the black stable buck. While Crooks is belittled and ordered around in the ranch at large, in his bunk he is sovereign; none of the other workers impede upon his living space.

    Candy comes by looking for Lennie and Crooks is secretly pleased that after so many years of solitude he is finally part of a sort of social gathering. They continue to discuss their plan to buy a farm and Crooks begins to warm to the scheme, even offering his own money and services if they ll take him on as well.

  7. author
    User1491864970 18 Jan 2017 01:55

    Lennie and George are migrant workers during the Great Depression. When the novel opens, they''''re on their way to work on a ranch in Salinas, California. Instead of going straight to the ranch, they camp by the river for the night and talk about their dream of one day having their own ranch.

    Overview Summary of the Novel
    Before reporting for work, migrant workers George Milton and Lennie Small spend the night on a peaceful riverbank. For the second time, George has to take away a dead mouse that Lennie has been petting. He consoles Lennie by recounting the story of their dream farm where Lennie will tend rabbits.

    Adults can''t decide if they want to require you to read John Steinbeck ''s Of Mice and Men —or make that sure you never even pick it up. Since it was published in 1937, it''s been banned about as often as it''s been assigned.

    Why? Take your pick, really. Killing. Violence. Swearing. Brothels. Racism. Sexism. The book''s ending is beyond sad, and might be considered an endorsement of euthanasia. Not to mention, its message isn''t exactly full of praise for the American way of life.

    This chapter takes place the next night, while all of the men are off at the whorehouse spending their weeks pay except for the feeble threesome of Crooks , Candy and Lennie. The setting is the little shed that leaned off the wall of the barn (73) that makes up Crooks quarters. Steinbeck gives us a glimpse at the quiet, neat, lonesome life of the black stable buck. While Crooks is belittled and ordered around in the ranch at large, in his bunk he is sovereign; none of the other workers impede upon his living space.

    Candy comes by looking for Lennie and Crooks is secretly pleased that after so many years of solitude he is finally part of a sort of social gathering. They continue to discuss their plan to buy a farm and Crooks begins to warm to the scheme, even offering his own money and services if they ll take him on as well.

  8. author
     🐰 |К Ø Р И́ Ц А|  🖤 18 Jan 2017 04:10

    Lennie and George are migrant workers during the Great Depression. When the novel opens, they''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''re on their way to work on a ranch in Salinas, California. Instead of going straight to the ranch, they camp by the river for the night and talk about their dream of one day having their own ranch.

    Overview Summary of the Novel
    Before reporting for work, migrant workers George Milton and Lennie Small spend the night on a peaceful riverbank. For the second time, George has to take away a dead mouse that Lennie has been petting. He consoles Lennie by recounting the story of their dream farm where Lennie will tend rabbits.

    Adults can''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t decide if they want to require you to read John Steinbeck ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s Of Mice and Men —or make that sure you never even pick it up. Since it was published in 1937, it''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s been banned about as often as it''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s been assigned.

    Why? Take your pick, really. Killing. Violence. Swearing. Brothels. Racism. Sexism. The book''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s ending is beyond sad, and might be considered an endorsement of euthanasia. Not to mention, its message isn''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t exactly full of praise for the American way of life.

    This chapter takes place the next night, while all of the men are off at the whorehouse spending their weeks pay except for the feeble threesome of Crooks , Candy and Lennie. The setting is the little shed that leaned off the wall of the barn (73) that makes up Crooks quarters. Steinbeck gives us a glimpse at the quiet, neat, lonesome life of the black stable buck. While Crooks is belittled and ordered around in the ranch at large, in his bunk he is sovereign; none of the other workers impede upon his living space.

    Candy comes by looking for Lennie and Crooks is secretly pleased that after so many years of solitude he is finally part of a sort of social gathering. They continue to discuss their plan to buy a farm and Crooks begins to warm to the scheme, even offering his own money and services if they ll take him on as well.

    If one theme can be thought of as defining the plot and symbolism of Of Mice and Men , that theme is loneliness. In many ways, from the outspoken to the subtle (such as Steinbeck s decision to set the novel near Soledad, California, a town name that means solitude in Spanish), the presence of loneliness defines the actions of the diverse characters in the book.

    The itinerant farm worker of the Great Depression found it nearly impossible to establish a fixed home. These men were forced to wander from ranch to ranch seeking temporary employment, to live in bunk houses with strangers, and to suffer the abuses of arbitrary bosses. George sums up the misery of this situation at several points during his monologues to Lennie - Guys like us, that work on ranches, are the loneliest guys in the world. They got no family. They don t belong no place (15).

    A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

    Novelguide.com is the premier free source for literary analysis on the web. We provide an educational supplement for better understanding of classic and contemporary literature. Novelguide.com is continually in the process of adding more books to the website each week. Please check back weekly to see what we have added. Please let us know if you have any suggestions or comments or would like any additional information. Thanks for checking out our website. More Details

  9. author
    bigmouse938 18 Jan 2017 05:31

    Lennie and George are migrant workers during the Great Depression. When the novel opens, they''re on their way to work on a ranch in Salinas, California. Instead of going straight to the ranch, they camp by the river for the night and talk about their dream of one day having their own ranch.

    Overview Summary of the Novel
    Before reporting for work, migrant workers George Milton and Lennie Small spend the night on a peaceful riverbank. For the second time, George has to take away a dead mouse that Lennie has been petting. He consoles Lennie by recounting the story of their dream farm where Lennie will tend rabbits.

    Adults can't decide if they want to require you to read John Steinbeck 's Of Mice and Men —or make that sure you never even pick it up. Since it was published in 1937, it's been banned about as often as it's been assigned.

    Why? Take your pick, really. Killing. Violence. Swearing. Brothels. Racism. Sexism. The book's ending is beyond sad, and might be considered an endorsement of euthanasia. Not to mention, its message isn't exactly full of praise for the American way of life.

  10. author
    yellowrabbit172 18 Jan 2017 07:38

    first and foremost, women all and sundry is a gender not a race. 2d of all, maximum subjects with racism concentration on Blacks and Hispanics because of the fact they re the biggest minorities and are extra vocal approximately racism in the direction of them. I agree a prior answerer that for the duration of in the present day, Arab people get lots extra blatant racism than Blacks or Hispanics, yet we don t see any public leaders of Arab descent talking out against it or Arab-people protesting against it, so it is not concentrated on.