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70. Life of Pi Part 1, Chapters 1-11 Summary and Analysis.

18 Jan 2017 21:24 | Author: User1492072928 | Category: Cover letter for a recreation programmer

Life of Pi is a story about struggling to survive through seemingly insurmountable odds. The shipwrecked inhabitants of the little lifeboat don’t simply acquiesce to their fate: they actively fight against it. Pi abandons his lifelong vegetarianism and eats fish to sustain himself. Orange Juice, the peaceful orangutan, fights ferociously against the hyena. Even the severely wounded zebra battles to stay alive; his slow, painful struggle vividly illustrates the sheer strength of his life force. As Martel makes clear in his novel, living creatures will often do extraordinary, unexpected, and sometimes heroic things to survive. However, they will also do shameful and barbaric things if pressed. The hyena’s treachery and the blind Frenchman’s turn toward cannibalism show just how far creatures will go when faced with the possibility of extinction. At the end of the novel, when Pi raises the possibility that the fierce tiger, Richard Parker , is actually an aspect of his own personality, and that Pi himself is responsible for some of the horrific events he has narrated, the reader is forced to decide just what kinds of actions are acceptable in a life-or-death situation.

Life of Pi is a story within a story within a story. The novel is framed by a (fictional) note from the author, Yann Martel, who describes how he first came to hear the fantastic tale of Piscine Molitor Patel. Within the framework of Martel’s narration is Pi’s fantastical first-person account of life on the open sea, which forms the bulk of the book. At the end of the novel, a transcript taken from an interrogation of Pi reveals the possible “true” story within that story: that there were no animals at all, and that Pi had spent those 227 days with other human survivors who all eventually perished, leaving only himself.

Comments
  1. author
    crazybutterfly930 18 Jan 2017 04:09

    Pi, however, is not a liar: to him, the various versions of his story each contain a different kind of truth. One version may be factually true, but the other has an emotional or thematic truth that the other cannot approach. Throughout the novel, Pi expresses disdain for rationalists who only put their faith in “dry, yeastless factuality,” when stories which can amaze and inspire listeners, and are bound to linger longer in the imagination are, to him, infinitely superior.

    Pi''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s lifeboat = faith
    Island = Religion
    Sea and Sun = harsh realities of real life, scrutinizing your faith
    Trees = clergy/priests/rabbis/imams, etc.
    Meerkats = followers of religion

    Pi’s devotion to God is a prominent part of the novel; it becomes, however, much less prominent during his time aboard the lifeboat, when his physical needs come to dominate his spiritual ones. Pi never seems to doubt his belief in God while enduring his hardships, but he certainly focuses on it less. This in turn underscores the theme of the primacy of survival.

    This is not to say that Martel intends the reader to read Life of Pi through a lens of disbelief or uncertainty; rather, he emphasizes the nature of the book as a story to show that one can choose to believe in it anyway, just as one can choose to believe in God—because it is preferable to not believing, it is “the better story.”

    Pi''''''''''''''''s lifeboat = faith
    Island = Religion
    Sea and Sun = harsh realities of real life, scrutinizing your faith
    Trees = clergy/priests/rabbis/imams, etc.
    Meerkats = followers of religion

    The overall message of the chapter is that although religion (organized faith) can aid us and stabilize us and nourish us spiritually in the short term, it is not a viable long-term answer to our spiritual questions, and will ultimately kill us mentally and spiritually.

    Life of Pi opens with a fictional author’s note, explaining the origins of the book. The author explains that while in India and floundering on the book he is trying to write, he travels to Pondicherry, where an elderly man, Mr. Adirubasamy, tells him he has a story for him that will make him believe in God. Adirubasamy tells the author about Pi, who the author manages to find in Canada, where Pi relates his story.

    That story begins in Chapter 1. Pi describes his education at the University of Toronto, his double major in religion and zoology, and why he is so fascinated by the sloth, an incredibly indolent creature. He says that his great suffering has made all subsequent pains both more unbearable and more trifling. He loves Canada, although he misses India deeply.

    In  Life of Pi , Piscine ("Pi") grows up the son of a zookeeper in India. When his father sells the zoo, they embark on a voyage to Canada, but the ship sinks, and Pi is stranded on a lifeboat with a zebra, an orangutan, a hyena, and a tiger.

    In Life of Pi , Piscene, or “Pi,” grows up in India as the son of a zookeeper. He studies Hinduism, Islam, and Christianity.

    6.3K Shares Share On Facebook Tweet Share Email Share Share Pin It Share Comment


    Ang Lee’s Life of Pi is racking-up critical acclaim ( read our review ) and pre-award season buzz along with solid box office numbers. Though, for every mention of the film’s beautiful 3D or amazing CGI tiger, there’s a fuddled viewer confused by the movie’s controversial ending.

  2. author
    silvertiger836 18 Jan 2017 03:32

    Pi, however, is not a liar: to him, the various versions of his story each contain a different kind of truth. One version may be factually true, but the other has an emotional or thematic truth that the other cannot approach. Throughout the novel, Pi expresses disdain for rationalists who only put their faith in “dry, yeastless factuality,” when stories which can amaze and inspire listeners, and are bound to linger longer in the imagination are, to him, infinitely superior.

    Pi''s lifeboat = faith
    Island = Religion
    Sea and Sun = harsh realities of real life, scrutinizing your faith
    Trees = clergy/priests/rabbis/imams, etc.
    Meerkats = followers of religion

    Pi’s devotion to God is a prominent part of the novel; it becomes, however, much less prominent during his time aboard the lifeboat, when his physical needs come to dominate his spiritual ones. Pi never seems to doubt his belief in God while enduring his hardships, but he certainly focuses on it less. This in turn underscores the theme of the primacy of survival.

    This is not to say that Martel intends the reader to read Life of Pi through a lens of disbelief or uncertainty; rather, he emphasizes the nature of the book as a story to show that one can choose to believe in it anyway, just as one can choose to believe in God—because it is preferable to not believing, it is “the better story.”

  3. author
    bigduck319 18 Jan 2017 08:19

    Pi, however, is not a liar: to him, the various versions of his story each contain a different kind of truth. One version may be factually true, but the other has an emotional or thematic truth that the other cannot approach. Throughout the novel, Pi expresses disdain for rationalists who only put their faith in “dry, yeastless factuality,” when stories which can amaze and inspire listeners, and are bound to linger longer in the imagination are, to him, infinitely superior.

    Pi''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s lifeboat = faith
    Island = Religion
    Sea and Sun = harsh realities of real life, scrutinizing your faith
    Trees = clergy/priests/rabbis/imams, etc.
    Meerkats = followers of religion

    Pi’s devotion to God is a prominent part of the novel; it becomes, however, much less prominent during his time aboard the lifeboat, when his physical needs come to dominate his spiritual ones. Pi never seems to doubt his belief in God while enduring his hardships, but he certainly focuses on it less. This in turn underscores the theme of the primacy of survival.

    This is not to say that Martel intends the reader to read Life of Pi through a lens of disbelief or uncertainty; rather, he emphasizes the nature of the book as a story to show that one can choose to believe in it anyway, just as one can choose to believe in God—because it is preferable to not believing, it is “the better story.”

    Pi''''''''s lifeboat = faith
    Island = Religion
    Sea and Sun = harsh realities of real life, scrutinizing your faith
    Trees = clergy/priests/rabbis/imams, etc.
    Meerkats = followers of religion

    The overall message of the chapter is that although religion (organized faith) can aid us and stabilize us and nourish us spiritually in the short term, it is not a viable long-term answer to our spiritual questions, and will ultimately kill us mentally and spiritually.

    Life of Pi opens with a fictional author’s note, explaining the origins of the book. The author explains that while in India and floundering on the book he is trying to write, he travels to Pondicherry, where an elderly man, Mr. Adirubasamy, tells him he has a story for him that will make him believe in God. Adirubasamy tells the author about Pi, who the author manages to find in Canada, where Pi relates his story.

    That story begins in Chapter 1. Pi describes his education at the University of Toronto, his double major in religion and zoology, and why he is so fascinated by the sloth, an incredibly indolent creature. He says that his great suffering has made all subsequent pains both more unbearable and more trifling. He loves Canada, although he misses India deeply.

    In  Life of Pi , Piscine ("Pi") grows up the son of a zookeeper in India. When his father sells the zoo, they embark on a voyage to Canada, but the ship sinks, and Pi is stranded on a lifeboat with a zebra, an orangutan, a hyena, and a tiger.

    In Life of Pi , Piscene, or “Pi,” grows up in India as the son of a zookeeper. He studies Hinduism, Islam, and Christianity.

  4. author
    redpanda896 18 Jan 2017 07:02

    Pi, however, is not a liar: to him, the various versions of his story each contain a different kind of truth. One version may be factually true, but the other has an emotional or thematic truth that the other cannot approach. Throughout the novel, Pi expresses disdain for rationalists who only put their faith in “dry, yeastless factuality,” when stories which can amaze and inspire listeners, and are bound to linger longer in the imagination are, to him, infinitely superior.

    Pi''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s lifeboat = faith
    Island = Religion
    Sea and Sun = harsh realities of real life, scrutinizing your faith
    Trees = clergy/priests/rabbis/imams, etc.
    Meerkats = followers of religion

    Pi’s devotion to God is a prominent part of the novel; it becomes, however, much less prominent during his time aboard the lifeboat, when his physical needs come to dominate his spiritual ones. Pi never seems to doubt his belief in God while enduring his hardships, but he certainly focuses on it less. This in turn underscores the theme of the primacy of survival.

    This is not to say that Martel intends the reader to read Life of Pi through a lens of disbelief or uncertainty; rather, he emphasizes the nature of the book as a story to show that one can choose to believe in it anyway, just as one can choose to believe in God—because it is preferable to not believing, it is “the better story.”

    Pi''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s lifeboat = faith
    Island = Religion
    Sea and Sun = harsh realities of real life, scrutinizing your faith
    Trees = clergy/priests/rabbis/imams, etc.
    Meerkats = followers of religion

    The overall message of the chapter is that although religion (organized faith) can aid us and stabilize us and nourish us spiritually in the short term, it is not a viable long-term answer to our spiritual questions, and will ultimately kill us mentally and spiritually.

    Life of Pi opens with a fictional author’s note, explaining the origins of the book. The author explains that while in India and floundering on the book he is trying to write, he travels to Pondicherry, where an elderly man, Mr. Adirubasamy, tells him he has a story for him that will make him believe in God. Adirubasamy tells the author about Pi, who the author manages to find in Canada, where Pi relates his story.

    That story begins in Chapter 1. Pi describes his education at the University of Toronto, his double major in religion and zoology, and why he is so fascinated by the sloth, an incredibly indolent creature. He says that his great suffering has made all subsequent pains both more unbearable and more trifling. He loves Canada, although he misses India deeply.

    In  Life of Pi , Piscine ("Pi") grows up the son of a zookeeper in India. When his father sells the zoo, they embark on a voyage to Canada, but the ship sinks, and Pi is stranded on a lifeboat with a zebra, an orangutan, a hyena, and a tiger.

    In Life of Pi , Piscene, or “Pi,” grows up in India as the son of a zookeeper. He studies Hinduism, Islam, and Christianity.

    6.3K Shares Share On Facebook Tweet Share Email Share Share Pin It Share Comment


    Ang Lee’s Life of Pi is racking-up critical acclaim ( read our review ) and pre-award season buzz along with solid box office numbers. Though, for every mention of the film’s beautiful 3D or amazing CGI tiger, there’s a fuddled viewer confused by the movie’s controversial ending.

    Sign up today for our newsletter: Christianity Today Weekly. CTWeekly delivers the best content from ChristianityToday.com to your inbox each week.

  5. author
    User1490808900 17 Jan 2017 22:33

    Shmoop guide to Animals = Humans in Life of Pi. Animals = Humans analysis by Ph.D. and Masters students from Stanford, Harvard, and Berkeley

  6. author
    purplefish164 18 Jan 2017 03:04

    Pi, however, is not a liar: to him, the various versions of his story each contain a different kind of truth. One version may be factually true, but the other has an emotional or thematic truth that the other cannot approach. Throughout the novel, Pi expresses disdain for rationalists who only put their faith in “dry, yeastless factuality,” when stories which can amaze and inspire listeners, and are bound to linger longer in the imagination are, to him, infinitely superior.

    Pi''''s lifeboat = faith
    Island = Religion
    Sea and Sun = harsh realities of real life, scrutinizing your faith
    Trees = clergy/priests/rabbis/imams, etc.
    Meerkats = followers of religion

    Pi’s devotion to God is a prominent part of the novel; it becomes, however, much less prominent during his time aboard the lifeboat, when his physical needs come to dominate his spiritual ones. Pi never seems to doubt his belief in God while enduring his hardships, but he certainly focuses on it less. This in turn underscores the theme of the primacy of survival.

    This is not to say that Martel intends the reader to read Life of Pi through a lens of disbelief or uncertainty; rather, he emphasizes the nature of the book as a story to show that one can choose to believe in it anyway, just as one can choose to believe in God—because it is preferable to not believing, it is “the better story.”

    Pi's lifeboat = faith
    Island = Religion
    Sea and Sun = harsh realities of real life, scrutinizing your faith
    Trees = clergy/priests/rabbis/imams, etc.
    Meerkats = followers of religion

    The overall message of the chapter is that although religion (organized faith) can aid us and stabilize us and nourish us spiritually in the short term, it is not a viable long-term answer to our spiritual questions, and will ultimately kill us mentally and spiritually.

  7. author
    brownfrog706 18 Jan 2017 07:12

    Pi, however, is not a liar: to him, the various versions of his story each contain a different kind of truth. One version may be factually true, but the other has an emotional or thematic truth that the other cannot approach. Throughout the novel, Pi expresses disdain for rationalists who only put their faith in “dry, yeastless factuality,” when stories which can amaze and inspire listeners, and are bound to linger longer in the imagination are, to him, infinitely superior.

    Pi''''''''''''''''s lifeboat = faith
    Island = Religion
    Sea and Sun = harsh realities of real life, scrutinizing your faith
    Trees = clergy/priests/rabbis/imams, etc.
    Meerkats = followers of religion

    Pi’s devotion to God is a prominent part of the novel; it becomes, however, much less prominent during his time aboard the lifeboat, when his physical needs come to dominate his spiritual ones. Pi never seems to doubt his belief in God while enduring his hardships, but he certainly focuses on it less. This in turn underscores the theme of the primacy of survival.

    This is not to say that Martel intends the reader to read Life of Pi through a lens of disbelief or uncertainty; rather, he emphasizes the nature of the book as a story to show that one can choose to believe in it anyway, just as one can choose to believe in God—because it is preferable to not believing, it is “the better story.”

    Pi''''s lifeboat = faith
    Island = Religion
    Sea and Sun = harsh realities of real life, scrutinizing your faith
    Trees = clergy/priests/rabbis/imams, etc.
    Meerkats = followers of religion

    The overall message of the chapter is that although religion (organized faith) can aid us and stabilize us and nourish us spiritually in the short term, it is not a viable long-term answer to our spiritual questions, and will ultimately kill us mentally and spiritually.

    Life of Pi opens with a fictional author’s note, explaining the origins of the book. The author explains that while in India and floundering on the book he is trying to write, he travels to Pondicherry, where an elderly man, Mr. Adirubasamy, tells him he has a story for him that will make him believe in God. Adirubasamy tells the author about Pi, who the author manages to find in Canada, where Pi relates his story.

    That story begins in Chapter 1. Pi describes his education at the University of Toronto, his double major in religion and zoology, and why he is so fascinated by the sloth, an incredibly indolent creature. He says that his great suffering has made all subsequent pains both more unbearable and more trifling. He loves Canada, although he misses India deeply.

    In  Life of Pi , Piscine ("Pi") grows up the son of a zookeeper in India. When his father sells the zoo, they embark on a voyage to Canada, but the ship sinks, and Pi is stranded on a lifeboat with a zebra, an orangutan, a hyena, and a tiger.

    In Life of Pi , Piscene, or “Pi,” grows up in India as the son of a zookeeper. He studies Hinduism, Islam, and Christianity.

  8. author
    heavysnake336 18 Jan 2017 03:27

    Order essay here life of pi essays on symbols

    Life of Pi is a story about struggling to survive through seemingly insurmountable odds. The shipwrecked inhabitants of the little lifeboat don’t simply acquiesce to their fate: they actively fight against it. Pi abandons his lifelong vegetarianism and eats fish to sustain himself. Orange Juice, the peaceful orangutan, fights ferociously against the hyena. Even the severely wounded zebra battles to stay alive; his slow, painful struggle vividly illustrates the sheer strength of his life force. As Martel makes clear in his novel, living creatures will often do extraordinary, unexpected, and sometimes heroic things to survive. However, they will also do shameful and barbaric things if pressed. The hyena’s treachery and the blind Frenchman’s turn toward cannibalism show just how far creatures will go when faced with the possibility of extinction. At the end of the novel, when Pi raises the possibility that the fierce tiger, Richard Parker , is actually an aspect of his own personality, and that Pi himself is responsible for some of the horrific events he has narrated, the reader is forced to decide just what kinds of actions are acceptable in a life-or-death situation.

    Life of Pi is a story within a story within a story. The novel is framed by a (fictional) note from the author, Yann Martel, who describes how he first came to hear the fantastic tale of Piscine Molitor Patel. Within the framework of Martel’s narration is Pi’s fantastical first-person account of life on the open sea, which forms the bulk of the book. At the end of the novel, a transcript taken from an interrogation of Pi reveals the possible “true” story within that story: that there were no animals at all, and that Pi had spent those 227 days with other human survivors who all eventually perished, leaving only himself.

  9. author
    User1488650897 17 Jan 2017 23:08

    Pi, however, is not a liar: to him, the various versions of his story each contain a different kind of truth. One version may be factually true, but the other has an emotional or thematic truth that the other cannot approach. Throughout the novel, Pi expresses disdain for rationalists who only put their faith in “dry, yeastless factuality,” when stories which can amaze and inspire listeners, and are bound to linger longer in the imagination are, to him, infinitely superior.

    Pi''''''''s lifeboat = faith
    Island = Religion
    Sea and Sun = harsh realities of real life, scrutinizing your faith
    Trees = clergy/priests/rabbis/imams, etc.
    Meerkats = followers of religion

    Pi’s devotion to God is a prominent part of the novel; it becomes, however, much less prominent during his time aboard the lifeboat, when his physical needs come to dominate his spiritual ones. Pi never seems to doubt his belief in God while enduring his hardships, but he certainly focuses on it less. This in turn underscores the theme of the primacy of survival.

    This is not to say that Martel intends the reader to read Life of Pi through a lens of disbelief or uncertainty; rather, he emphasizes the nature of the book as a story to show that one can choose to believe in it anyway, just as one can choose to believe in God—because it is preferable to not believing, it is “the better story.”

    Pi''s lifeboat = faith
    Island = Religion
    Sea and Sun = harsh realities of real life, scrutinizing your faith
    Trees = clergy/priests/rabbis/imams, etc.
    Meerkats = followers of religion

    The overall message of the chapter is that although religion (organized faith) can aid us and stabilize us and nourish us spiritually in the short term, it is not a viable long-term answer to our spiritual questions, and will ultimately kill us mentally and spiritually.

    Life of Pi opens with a fictional author’s note, explaining the origins of the book. The author explains that while in India and floundering on the book he is trying to write, he travels to Pondicherry, where an elderly man, Mr. Adirubasamy, tells him he has a story for him that will make him believe in God. Adirubasamy tells the author about Pi, who the author manages to find in Canada, where Pi relates his story.

    That story begins in Chapter 1. Pi describes his education at the University of Toronto, his double major in religion and zoology, and why he is so fascinated by the sloth, an incredibly indolent creature. He says that his great suffering has made all subsequent pains both more unbearable and more trifling. He loves Canada, although he misses India deeply.

  10. author
    brownbird996 18 Jan 2017 09:28

    Pi, however, is not a liar: to him, the various versions of his story each contain a different kind of truth. One version may be factually true, but the other has an emotional or thematic truth that the other cannot approach. Throughout the novel, Pi expresses disdain for rationalists who only put their faith in “dry, yeastless factuality,” when stories which can amaze and inspire listeners, and are bound to linger longer in the imagination are, to him, infinitely superior.

    Pi''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s lifeboat = faith
    Island = Religion
    Sea and Sun = harsh realities of real life, scrutinizing your faith
    Trees = clergy/priests/rabbis/imams, etc.
    Meerkats = followers of religion

    Pi’s devotion to God is a prominent part of the novel; it becomes, however, much less prominent during his time aboard the lifeboat, when his physical needs come to dominate his spiritual ones. Pi never seems to doubt his belief in God while enduring his hardships, but he certainly focuses on it less. This in turn underscores the theme of the primacy of survival.

    This is not to say that Martel intends the reader to read Life of Pi through a lens of disbelief or uncertainty; rather, he emphasizes the nature of the book as a story to show that one can choose to believe in it anyway, just as one can choose to believe in God—because it is preferable to not believing, it is “the better story.”

    Pi''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s lifeboat = faith
    Island = Religion
    Sea and Sun = harsh realities of real life, scrutinizing your faith
    Trees = clergy/priests/rabbis/imams, etc.
    Meerkats = followers of religion

    The overall message of the chapter is that although religion (organized faith) can aid us and stabilize us and nourish us spiritually in the short term, it is not a viable long-term answer to our spiritual questions, and will ultimately kill us mentally and spiritually.

    Life of Pi opens with a fictional author’s note, explaining the origins of the book. The author explains that while in India and floundering on the book he is trying to write, he travels to Pondicherry, where an elderly man, Mr. Adirubasamy, tells him he has a story for him that will make him believe in God. Adirubasamy tells the author about Pi, who the author manages to find in Canada, where Pi relates his story.

    That story begins in Chapter 1. Pi describes his education at the University of Toronto, his double major in religion and zoology, and why he is so fascinated by the sloth, an incredibly indolent creature. He says that his great suffering has made all subsequent pains both more unbearable and more trifling. He loves Canada, although he misses India deeply.

    In  Life of Pi , Piscine ("Pi") grows up the son of a zookeeper in India. When his father sells the zoo, they embark on a voyage to Canada, but the ship sinks, and Pi is stranded on a lifeboat with a zebra, an orangutan, a hyena, and a tiger.

    In Life of Pi , Piscene, or “Pi,” grows up in India as the son of a zookeeper. He studies Hinduism, Islam, and Christianity.

    6.3K Shares Share On Facebook Tweet Share Email Share Share Pin It Share Comment


    Ang Lee’s Life of Pi is racking-up critical acclaim ( read our review ) and pre-award season buzz along with solid box office numbers. Though, for every mention of the film’s beautiful 3D or amazing CGI tiger, there’s a fuddled viewer confused by the movie’s controversial ending.

    Sign up today for our newsletter: Christianity Today Weekly. CTWeekly delivers the best content from ChristianityToday.com to your inbox each week.

  11. author
    User1488216953 18 Jan 2017 06:44

    Pi, however, is not a liar: to him, the various versions of his story each contain a different kind of truth. One version may be factually true, but the other has an emotional or thematic truth that the other cannot approach. Throughout the novel, Pi expresses disdain for rationalists who only put their faith in “dry, yeastless factuality,” when stories which can amaze and inspire listeners, and are bound to linger longer in the imagination are, to him, infinitely superior.

    Pi''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s lifeboat = faith
    Island = Religion
    Sea and Sun = harsh realities of real life, scrutinizing your faith
    Trees = clergy/priests/rabbis/imams, etc.
    Meerkats = followers of religion

    Pi’s devotion to God is a prominent part of the novel; it becomes, however, much less prominent during his time aboard the lifeboat, when his physical needs come to dominate his spiritual ones. Pi never seems to doubt his belief in God while enduring his hardships, but he certainly focuses on it less. This in turn underscores the theme of the primacy of survival.

    This is not to say that Martel intends the reader to read Life of Pi through a lens of disbelief or uncertainty; rather, he emphasizes the nature of the book as a story to show that one can choose to believe in it anyway, just as one can choose to believe in God—because it is preferable to not believing, it is “the better story.”

    Pi''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s lifeboat = faith
    Island = Religion
    Sea and Sun = harsh realities of real life, scrutinizing your faith
    Trees = clergy/priests/rabbis/imams, etc.
    Meerkats = followers of religion

    The overall message of the chapter is that although religion (organized faith) can aid us and stabilize us and nourish us spiritually in the short term, it is not a viable long-term answer to our spiritual questions, and will ultimately kill us mentally and spiritually.

    Life of Pi opens with a fictional author’s note, explaining the origins of the book. The author explains that while in India and floundering on the book he is trying to write, he travels to Pondicherry, where an elderly man, Mr. Adirubasamy, tells him he has a story for him that will make him believe in God. Adirubasamy tells the author about Pi, who the author manages to find in Canada, where Pi relates his story.

    That story begins in Chapter 1. Pi describes his education at the University of Toronto, his double major in religion and zoology, and why he is so fascinated by the sloth, an incredibly indolent creature. He says that his great suffering has made all subsequent pains both more unbearable and more trifling. He loves Canada, although he misses India deeply.

    In  Life of Pi , Piscine ("Pi") grows up the son of a zookeeper in India. When his father sells the zoo, they embark on a voyage to Canada, but the ship sinks, and Pi is stranded on a lifeboat with a zebra, an orangutan, a hyena, and a tiger.

    In Life of Pi , Piscene, or “Pi,” grows up in India as the son of a zookeeper. He studies Hinduism, Islam, and Christianity.

    6.3K Shares Share On Facebook Tweet Share Email Share Share Pin It Share Comment


    Ang Lee’s Life of Pi is racking-up critical acclaim ( read our review ) and pre-award season buzz along with solid box office numbers. Though, for every mention of the film’s beautiful 3D or amazing CGI tiger, there’s a fuddled viewer confused by the movie’s controversial ending.