6

Review Good to great by Jim Collins?

18 Jan 2017 21:24 | Author: User1492076048 | Category: Resume sur la guerre de troie naura pas lieu

The Challenge
Built to Last, the defining management study of the nineties, showed how great companies triumph over time and how long-term sustained performance can be engineered into the DNA of an enterprise from the verybeginning.

But what about the company that is not born with great DNA? How can good companies, mediocre companies, even bad

The author and his team of researchers established these good-to-great benchmarks:

  • The companies had to have experienced 15-year cumulative stock returns that were at or below the general stock market, punctuated by a transition point, then cumulative returns at least three times the market over the next fifteen years.
  • Each company had to demonstrate the good-to-great pattern independent of its industry.
  • Each company had to demonstrate a pattern of results.
  • Each company was compared to other similar companies that either never made the good-to-great leap (or made it but did not sustain it), in order to determine what distinguished the good-to-great company from all others.

Comments
  1. author
    brownswan801 18 Jan 2017 00:08

    Some of those are from feminine views, a few could also be just a little "girly lady" in your liking however others must be ok. I ve left each style on and you ll be able to make a decision. Meryll of the Stone (Brian Caswell) Picnic at Hanging Rock (Joan Lindsay) Stranger with my face (Lois Duncan) Playing Beattie Bow (Ruth Parks) My Sister Sif (Ruth Parks) Hitch hikers advisor to the Galaxy (Douglas Adams) Holes (Louis Sachar) Lord of the Rings / The Hobbit Eragorn trilogy Narnia The Golden Compass Interview with a Vampire (Anne Rice) Requiem for a Princess (Ruth M Arthur) Looking for Alibrandi (Melina Marchetta) Angels Gate (Gary Crew) Sisterhood of the Travelling Pants Pelican s Creek (Maureen Pople) The Diary of Anne Frank To Kill a Mockingbird (Harper Lee) The Shiralee (Dárcy Niland) Into the Wild (John Krakauer) Chocolat (Joanne Harris) Harp within the South; Poor Man s Orange; Missus (Trilogy by way of Ruth Parks) Where the Heart is (Billie Letts) My Place (Sally Morgan) Little Women (Louisa May Alcott) Rebecca (Daphne De Maurier) The three Muskateers (Alexandre Dumas) Anything by way of the Bronte sisters or Jane Austen Whatever you do don’t run The December Boys (Robert Noonan)

  2. author
    Осипов Андрей 18 Jan 2017 02:17

    Jim Collins is the author of Good to Great, Built to Last and How the Mighty Fall.

  3. author
    crazybird837 18 Jan 2017 03:41

    Executive Summary Jim Collins, already established as one of the most influential management consultants, further established his credibility with the wildly popular Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap.and Others Don’t, originally published in 2001. The book went on to be one of the bestsellers in the genre, and it is now widely regarded as a modern classic of management theory. Collins takes up a daunting challenge in the book: identifying and evaluating the factors and variables that allow a small fraction of companies to make the transition from merely good to truly great. ‘Great,’ an admittedly subjective term, is operationally defined according to a number of metrics, including, specifically, financial performance that exceeded the market average by several orders of magnitude over a sustained period of time. Using these criteria, Collins and his research team exhaustively catalogued the business literature, identifying a handful of companies that fulfilled their predetermined criteria for greatness. Then, the defining characteristics that differentiated these ‘great’ firms from their competitors were quantified and analyzed. The resulting data are presented in Good to Great in compelling detail. Over the course of 9 chapters, Collins addresses a number of management, personnel, and operational practices, behaviors, and attitudes that are both conducive and antithetical to the good-to-great transition. One overarching theme that links together virtually all of Collins’ arguments is the need to define a narrowly focused objective and field of competency and then focus all of the company’s resources toward that area of strength. Repeatedly, Collins warns that straying too far from a company’s established strengths is inimical to the attainment of greatness. Finally, Collins links the findings of Good to Great to the conclusions he reached in his previous book, Built to Last, which focused on the factors that define companies that survive in the long-term, meshing both sets of results into an overarching framework for enduring success.

  4. author
    crazykoala823 18 Jan 2017 06:25

    2) Books by author Dan Brown The DaVinci Code Angels and Demons The Lost Symbol 3) Books by George Orwell 1984 4) Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury 5) 7 Habits of Highly Effective Teens by Sean Covey 6) Good To Great by Jim Collins 7) Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies by Jared Diamond 8) Left Behind (Novel #1) 9) Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse 10) Glenn Beck’s Common Sense by Glenn Beck

  5. author
    goldentiger518 18 Jan 2017 08:30

    Order paper here good to great book by jim collins

    The Challenge
    Built to Last, the defining management study of the nineties, showed how great companies triumph over time and how long-term sustained performance can be engineered into the DNA of an enterprise from the verybeginning.

    But what about the company that is not born with great DNA? How can good companies, mediocre companies, even bad

    The author and his team of researchers established these good-to-great benchmarks:

    • The companies had to have experienced 15-year cumulative stock returns that were at or below the general stock market, punctuated by a transition point, then cumulative returns at least three times the market over the next fifteen years.
    • Each company had to demonstrate the good-to-great pattern independent of its industry.
    • Each company had to demonstrate a pattern of results.
    • Each company was compared to other similar companies that either never made the good-to-great leap (or made it but did not sustain it), in order to determine what distinguished the good-to-great company from all others.