11

Slate Magazine – News, Politics & Culture

18 Jan 2017 21:24 | Author: User1492114757 | Category: Essay domestic animal dog

Sign up for the Snopes.com newsletter and get daily updates on all the best rumors, news and legends delivered straight to your inbox.

Comments
  1. author
    User1490985861 17 Jan 2017 22:26

    These five passages have not been picked out because they are especially bad I could have quoted far worse if I had chosen but because they illustrate various of the mental vices from which we now suffer. They are a little below the average, but are fairly representative examples. I number them so that I can refer back to them when necessary:

    1. I am not, indeed, sure whether it is not true to say that the Milton who once seemed not unlike a seventeenth-century Shelley had not become, out of an experience ever more bitter in each year, more alien [sic] to the founder of that Jesuit sect which nothing could induce him to tolerate.

    " Politics and the English Language " (1946) is an essay by George Orwell that criticises the "ugly and inaccurate" written English of his time and examines the connection between political orthodoxies and the debasement of language.

    The insincerity of the writer perpetuates the decline of the language as people (particularly politicians, Orwell later notes) attempt to disguise their intentions behind euphemisms and convoluted phrasing. Orwell says that this decline is self-perpetuating. He argues that it is easier to think with poor English because the language is in decline, as the language declines, "foolish" thoughts become even easier, reinforcing the original cause:

    Eric Arthur Blair (25 June 1903 – 21 January 1950), [1] better known by his pen name George Orwell , was an English novelist, essayist, journalist, and critic. His work is marked by lucid prose, awareness of social injustice , opposition to totalitarianism , and outspoken support of democratic socialism. [2] [3]

    Orwell''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s work continues to influence popular and political culture , and the term Orwellian – descriptive of totalitarian or authoritarian social practices – has entered the language together with many of his neologisms , including cold war , Big Brother , Thought Police , Room 101 , memory hole , newspeak , doublethink , and thoughtcrime . [5]

    When I was about sixteen I suddenly discovered the joy of mere words, i.e. the sounds and associations of words. The lines from Paradise Lost

    A happy vicar I might have been
    Two hundred years ago
    To preach upon eternal doom
    And watch my walnuts grow;

    The inspiration for Orwell's growth into conservatism remains unexplored. Likely reasons include his open-mindedness, his adopting and then raising (due to his wife's untimely death) a child, and his disillusionment with leftists while fighting on their side in Spain.

    Orwell's political views began to move away from the far left when he volunteered to fight the Spanish Nationalist forces to keep them from overturning the Soviet -backed revolutionary socialist government of Spain [3] in the Spаnish Civil War (1936-1939). He enlisted in the POUM (In English, Workers Party for Marxist Unity) Militia, and saw action on the Aragon front, where he fought side by side with Anаrchists and Communists, as well as Republican regulars.

  2. author
    Максим Казаров 18 Jan 2017 01:42

    These five passages have not been picked out because they are especially bad I could have quoted far worse if I had chosen but because they illustrate various of the mental vices from which we now suffer. They are a little below the average, but are fairly representative examples. I number them so that I can refer back to them when necessary:

    1. I am not, indeed, sure whether it is not true to say that the Milton who once seemed not unlike a seventeenth-century Shelley had not become, out of an experience ever more bitter in each year, more alien [sic] to the founder of that Jesuit sect which nothing could induce him to tolerate.

    " Politics and the English Language " (1946) is an essay by George Orwell that criticises the "ugly and inaccurate" written English of his time and examines the connection between political orthodoxies and the debasement of language.

    The insincerity of the writer perpetuates the decline of the language as people (particularly politicians, Orwell later notes) attempt to disguise their intentions behind euphemisms and convoluted phrasing. Orwell says that this decline is self-perpetuating. He argues that it is easier to think with poor English because the language is in decline, as the language declines, "foolish" thoughts become even easier, reinforcing the original cause:

  3. author
    yellowbird287 18 Jan 2017 05:41

    These five passages have not been picked out because they are especially bad I could have quoted far worse if I had chosen but because they illustrate various of the mental vices from which we now suffer. They are a little below the average, but are fairly representative examples. I number them so that I can refer back to them when necessary:

    1. I am not, indeed, sure whether it is not true to say that the Milton who once seemed not unlike a seventeenth-century Shelley had not become, out of an experience ever more bitter in each year, more alien [sic] to the founder of that Jesuit sect which nothing could induce him to tolerate.

    " Politics and the English Language " (1946) is an essay by George Orwell that criticises the "ugly and inaccurate" written English of his time and examines the connection between political orthodoxies and the debasement of language.

    The insincerity of the writer perpetuates the decline of the language as people (particularly politicians, Orwell later notes) attempt to disguise their intentions behind euphemisms and convoluted phrasing. Orwell says that this decline is self-perpetuating. He argues that it is easier to think with poor English because the language is in decline, as the language declines, "foolish" thoughts become even easier, reinforcing the original cause:

    Eric Arthur Blair (25 June 1903 – 21 January 1950), [1] better known by his pen name George Orwell , was an English novelist, essayist, journalist, and critic. His work is marked by lucid prose, awareness of social injustice , opposition to totalitarianism , and outspoken support of democratic socialism. [2] [3]

    Orwell''s work continues to influence popular and political culture , and the term Orwellian – descriptive of totalitarian or authoritarian social practices – has entered the language together with many of his neologisms , including cold war , Big Brother , Thought Police , Room 101 , memory hole , newspeak , doublethink , and thoughtcrime . [5]

  4. author
    bigelephant347 18 Jan 2017 05:53

    I teach that essay to my students. It s not really a literary piece, but it has lots of rhetorical elements. Have you tried just doing a couple Google searches? I d be truly surprised if there were no online resources on it.

  5. author
    киндер 18 Jan 2017 07:19

    These five passages have not been picked out because they are especially bad I could have quoted far worse if I had chosen but because they illustrate various of the mental vices from which we now suffer. They are a little below the average, but are fairly representative examples. I number them so that I can refer back to them when necessary:

    1. I am not, indeed, sure whether it is not true to say that the Milton who once seemed not unlike a seventeenth-century Shelley had not become, out of an experience ever more bitter in each year, more alien [sic] to the founder of that Jesuit sect which nothing could induce him to tolerate.

    " Politics and the English Language " (1946) is an essay by George Orwell that criticises the "ugly and inaccurate" written English of his time and examines the connection between political orthodoxies and the debasement of language.

    The insincerity of the writer perpetuates the decline of the language as people (particularly politicians, Orwell later notes) attempt to disguise their intentions behind euphemisms and convoluted phrasing. Orwell says that this decline is self-perpetuating. He argues that it is easier to think with poor English because the language is in decline, as the language declines, "foolish" thoughts become even easier, reinforcing the original cause:

    Eric Arthur Blair (25 June 1903 – 21 January 1950), [1] better known by his pen name George Orwell , was an English novelist, essayist, journalist, and critic. His work is marked by lucid prose, awareness of social injustice , opposition to totalitarianism , and outspoken support of democratic socialism. [2] [3]

    Orwell''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s work continues to influence popular and political culture , and the term Orwellian – descriptive of totalitarian or authoritarian social practices – has entered the language together with many of his neologisms , including cold war , Big Brother , Thought Police , Room 101 , memory hole , newspeak , doublethink , and thoughtcrime . [5]

    When I was about sixteen I suddenly discovered the joy of mere words, i.e. the sounds and associations of words. The lines from Paradise Lost

    A happy vicar I might have been
    Two hundred years ago
    To preach upon eternal doom
    And watch my walnuts grow;

    The inspiration for Orwell''s growth into conservatism remains unexplored. Likely reasons include his open-mindedness, his adopting and then raising (due to his wife''s untimely death) a child, and his disillusionment with leftists while fighting on their side in Spain.

    Orwell''s political views began to move away from the far left when he volunteered to fight the Spanish Nationalist forces to keep them from overturning the Soviet -backed revolutionary socialist government of Spain [3] in the Spаnish Civil War (1936-1939). He enlisted in the POUM (In English, Workers Party for Marxist Unity) Militia, and saw action on the Aragon front, where he fought side by side with Anаrchists and Communists, as well as Republican regulars.

  6. author
    lazybird717 18 Jan 2017 02:33

    These five passages have not been picked out because they are especially bad I could have quoted far worse if I had chosen but because they illustrate various of the mental vices from which we now suffer. They are a little below the average, but are fairly representative examples. I number them so that I can refer back to them when necessary:

    1. I am not, indeed, sure whether it is not true to say that the Milton who once seemed not unlike a seventeenth-century Shelley had not become, out of an experience ever more bitter in each year, more alien [sic] to the founder of that Jesuit sect which nothing could induce him to tolerate.

    " Politics and the English Language " (1946) is an essay by George Orwell that criticises the "ugly and inaccurate" written English of his time and examines the connection between political orthodoxies and the debasement of language.

    The insincerity of the writer perpetuates the decline of the language as people (particularly politicians, Orwell later notes) attempt to disguise their intentions behind euphemisms and convoluted phrasing. Orwell says that this decline is self-perpetuating. He argues that it is easier to think with poor English because the language is in decline, as the language declines, "foolish" thoughts become even easier, reinforcing the original cause:

    Eric Arthur Blair (25 June 1903 – 21 January 1950), [1] better known by his pen name George Orwell , was an English novelist, essayist, journalist, and critic. His work is marked by lucid prose, awareness of social injustice , opposition to totalitarianism , and outspoken support of democratic socialism. [2] [3]

    Orwell''''s work continues to influence popular and political culture , and the term Orwellian – descriptive of totalitarian or authoritarian social practices – has entered the language together with many of his neologisms , including cold war , Big Brother , Thought Police , Room 101 , memory hole , newspeak , doublethink , and thoughtcrime . [5]

    When I was about sixteen I suddenly discovered the joy of mere words, i.e. the sounds and associations of words. The lines from Paradise Lost

    A happy vicar I might have been
    Two hundred years ago
    To preach upon eternal doom
    And watch my walnuts grow;

  7. author
    bigbear313 18 Jan 2017 01:04

    These five passages have not been picked out because they are especially bad I could have quoted far worse if I had chosen but because they illustrate various of the mental vices from which we now suffer. They are a little below the average, but are fairly representative examples. I number them so that I can refer back to them when necessary:

    1. I am not, indeed, sure whether it is not true to say that the Milton who once seemed not unlike a seventeenth-century Shelley had not become, out of an experience ever more bitter in each year, more alien [sic] to the founder of that Jesuit sect which nothing could induce him to tolerate.

    " Politics and the English Language " (1946) is an essay by George Orwell that criticises the "ugly and inaccurate" written English of his time and examines the connection between political orthodoxies and the debasement of language.

    The insincerity of the writer perpetuates the decline of the language as people (particularly politicians, Orwell later notes) attempt to disguise their intentions behind euphemisms and convoluted phrasing. Orwell says that this decline is self-perpetuating. He argues that it is easier to think with poor English because the language is in decline, as the language declines, "foolish" thoughts become even easier, reinforcing the original cause:

    Eric Arthur Blair (25 June 1903 – 21 January 1950), [1] better known by his pen name George Orwell , was an English novelist, essayist, journalist, and critic. His work is marked by lucid prose, awareness of social injustice , opposition to totalitarianism , and outspoken support of democratic socialism. [2] [3]

    Orwell''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s work continues to influence popular and political culture , and the term Orwellian – descriptive of totalitarian or authoritarian social practices – has entered the language together with many of his neologisms , including cold war , Big Brother , Thought Police , Room 101 , memory hole , newspeak , doublethink , and thoughtcrime . [5]

    When I was about sixteen I suddenly discovered the joy of mere words, i.e. the sounds and associations of words. The lines from Paradise Lost

    A happy vicar I might have been
    Two hundred years ago
    To preach upon eternal doom
    And watch my walnuts grow;

    The inspiration for Orwell''''s growth into conservatism remains unexplored. Likely reasons include his open-mindedness, his adopting and then raising (due to his wife''''s untimely death) a child, and his disillusionment with leftists while fighting on their side in Spain.

    Orwell''''s political views began to move away from the far left when he volunteered to fight the Spanish Nationalist forces to keep them from overturning the Soviet -backed revolutionary socialist government of Spain [3] in the Spаnish Civil War (1936-1939). He enlisted in the POUM (In English, Workers Party for Marxist Unity) Militia, and saw action on the Aragon front, where he fought side by side with Anаrchists and Communists, as well as Republican regulars.

  8. author
    User1491683275 18 Jan 2017 03:46

    These five passages have not been picked out because they are especially bad I could have quoted far worse if I had chosen but because they illustrate various of the mental vices from which we now suffer. They are a little below the average, but are fairly representative examples. I number them so that I can refer back to them when necessary:

    1. I am not, indeed, sure whether it is not true to say that the Milton who once seemed not unlike a seventeenth-century Shelley had not become, out of an experience ever more bitter in each year, more alien [sic] to the founder of that Jesuit sect which nothing could induce him to tolerate.

    " Politics and the English Language " (1946) is an essay by George Orwell that criticises the "ugly and inaccurate" written English of his time and examines the connection between political orthodoxies and the debasement of language.

    The insincerity of the writer perpetuates the decline of the language as people (particularly politicians, Orwell later notes) attempt to disguise their intentions behind euphemisms and convoluted phrasing. Orwell says that this decline is self-perpetuating. He argues that it is easier to think with poor English because the language is in decline, as the language declines, "foolish" thoughts become even easier, reinforcing the original cause:

    Eric Arthur Blair (25 June 1903 – 21 January 1950), [1] better known by his pen name George Orwell , was an English novelist, essayist, journalist, and critic. His work is marked by lucid prose, awareness of social injustice , opposition to totalitarianism , and outspoken support of democratic socialism. [2] [3]

    Orwell''''''''s work continues to influence popular and political culture , and the term Orwellian – descriptive of totalitarian or authoritarian social practices – has entered the language together with many of his neologisms , including cold war , Big Brother , Thought Police , Room 101 , memory hole , newspeak , doublethink , and thoughtcrime . [5]

    When I was about sixteen I suddenly discovered the joy of mere words, i.e. the sounds and associations of words. The lines from Paradise Lost

    A happy vicar I might have been
    Two hundred years ago
    To preach upon eternal doom
    And watch my walnuts grow;

  9. author
    User1488294423 17 Jan 2017 22:40

    These five passages have not been picked out because they are especially bad I could have quoted far worse if I had chosen but because they illustrate various of the mental vices from which we now suffer. They are a little below the average, but are fairly representative examples. I number them so that I can refer back to them when necessary:

    1. I am not, indeed, sure whether it is not true to say that the Milton who once seemed not unlike a seventeenth-century Shelley had not become, out of an experience ever more bitter in each year, more alien [sic] to the founder of that Jesuit sect which nothing could induce him to tolerate.

    " Politics and the English Language " (1946) is an essay by George Orwell that criticises the "ugly and inaccurate" written English of his time and examines the connection between political orthodoxies and the debasement of language.

    The insincerity of the writer perpetuates the decline of the language as people (particularly politicians, Orwell later notes) attempt to disguise their intentions behind euphemisms and convoluted phrasing. Orwell says that this decline is self-perpetuating. He argues that it is easier to think with poor English because the language is in decline, as the language declines, "foolish" thoughts become even easier, reinforcing the original cause:

    Eric Arthur Blair (25 June 1903 – 21 January 1950), [1] better known by his pen name George Orwell , was an English novelist, essayist, journalist, and critic. His work is marked by lucid prose, awareness of social injustice , opposition to totalitarianism , and outspoken support of democratic socialism. [2] [3]

    Orwell's work continues to influence popular and political culture , and the term Orwellian – descriptive of totalitarian or authoritarian social practices – has entered the language together with many of his neologisms , including cold war , Big Brother , Thought Police , Room 101 , memory hole , newspeak , doublethink , and thoughtcrime . [5]

  10. author
    smallrabbit876 18 Jan 2017 03:20

    These five passages have not been picked out because they are especially bad I could have quoted far worse if I had chosen but because they illustrate various of the mental vices from which we now suffer. They are a little below the average, but are fairly representative examples. I number them so that I can refer back to them when necessary:

    1. I am not, indeed, sure whether it is not true to say that the Milton who once seemed not unlike a seventeenth-century Shelley had not become, out of an experience ever more bitter in each year, more alien [sic] to the founder of that Jesuit sect which nothing could induce him to tolerate.

    " Politics and the English Language " (1946) is an essay by George Orwell that criticises the "ugly and inaccurate" written English of his time and examines the connection between political orthodoxies and the debasement of language.

    The insincerity of the writer perpetuates the decline of the language as people (particularly politicians, Orwell later notes) attempt to disguise their intentions behind euphemisms and convoluted phrasing. Orwell says that this decline is self-perpetuating. He argues that it is easier to think with poor English because the language is in decline, as the language declines, "foolish" thoughts become even easier, reinforcing the original cause:

    Eric Arthur Blair (25 June 1903 – 21 January 1950), [1] better known by his pen name George Orwell , was an English novelist, essayist, journalist, and critic. His work is marked by lucid prose, awareness of social injustice , opposition to totalitarianism , and outspoken support of democratic socialism. [2] [3]

    Orwell''''''''''''''''s work continues to influence popular and political culture , and the term Orwellian – descriptive of totalitarian or authoritarian social practices – has entered the language together with many of his neologisms , including cold war , Big Brother , Thought Police , Room 101 , memory hole , newspeak , doublethink , and thoughtcrime . [5]

    When I was about sixteen I suddenly discovered the joy of mere words, i.e. the sounds and associations of words. The lines from Paradise Lost

    A happy vicar I might have been
    Two hundred years ago
    To preach upon eternal doom
    And watch my walnuts grow;