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Negatives to fast food nation?

18 Jan 2017 21:24 | Author: purplegoose820 | Category: Introduction premarital sex term paper

If you want to see what eating in Los Angeles is like, beyond the gold-plated Beverly Hills bistros and the bottle-service clubs that count the Kardashians among their clientele, you could do worse than to pull into a deserted parking lot late at night, check the coordinates on your iPhone and watch the stretch of asphalt fill with hundreds of hungry people. They, and probably you, have been summoned here by a Twitter blast from the Kogi truck, a retrofitted catering van serving Korean short-rib tacos, kimchi dogs and other edible symbols of L.A.’s famous cross-cultural inclusiveness, dripping plates of food drawn straight from the city’s recombinant DNA.

In the city that gave birth to the celebrity chef, Kogi’s Roy Choi is the culinary star of the moment, with awards and an international renown usually reserved for those who command palaces of cuisine. His success has inspired fleets of similar trucks, with followings for their sushi, dim sum, Brazilian barbecue, Greek sausages, red velvet pancakes, Vietnamese sandwiches, cupcakes, Indian dosas, Filipino halo-halo, Texas barbecue and any of a hundred other things. You can wander between dozens of them on the streets near the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Yahoo offices, Venice boutiques or the UCLA dorms.

Comments
  1. author
    purpleelephant607 18 Jan 2017 07:01

    Fast food is incredibly bad for you. BUT, I eat it about twice a month, and I m healthy and not overweight. I think the key is moderation. If you eat fast food a lot, chances are you are going to unhealthy, sluggish, and overweight. It s very hard on your body. I only eat it twice a month usually, and I do really love Mcnuggets, I don t care what s in them! But I also constantly eat fresh fruit and veggies, and lots of lean meat and whole grains. I don t think it should be outlawed or anything crazy like that. The people that eat themselves to death on double doubles have no one to blame but themselves and their lack of self control, and shouldn t spoil it for the rest of us.

  2. author
    User1491861943 18 Jan 2017 01:41

    At a time in America when finances are shaky, yet even modest big-city restaurant spaces involve multimillion-dollar build-outs, when consumers have wearied of giant chains but still demand food that is novel, inexpensive and fast, food trucks are the new incubators of culinary innovation. The food-truck phenomenon exploded in cities across the United States last year thanks largely to the success of Kogi, and before that to the mobile fleet of taqueros spread out across L.A. Who knew that the cult of tacos al pastor would become a nationwide sensation?

    Could the new-style trucks thrive in the land of the lonchera? Maybe if they found the right place to park. I drove down to Boyle Heights to look for Ortega. It wasn’t hard. He was in his usual location, across the street from the oldest garden-apartment complex in L.A., and his two daughters were minding the clean, if battered, seafood truck. I inhaled a shrimp taco before I even said hello.

    Michael Specter has been a staff writer at The New Yorker since 1998, and has written frequently about AIDS, T.B., and malaria in the developing world, as well as about agricultural biotechnology, avian influenza, the world’s diminishing freshwater resources, and synthetic biology.

  3. author
    silverostrich340 17 Jan 2017 22:10

    Order essay here fast food nation essays on music

    If you want to see what eating in Los Angeles is like, beyond the gold-plated Beverly Hills bistros and the bottle-service clubs that count the Kardashians among their clientele, you could do worse than to pull into a deserted parking lot late at night, check the coordinates on your iPhone and watch the stretch of asphalt fill with hundreds of hungry people. They, and probably you, have been summoned here by a Twitter blast from the Kogi truck, a retrofitted catering van serving Korean short-rib tacos, kimchi dogs and other edible symbols of L.A.’s famous cross-cultural inclusiveness, dripping plates of food drawn straight from the city’s recombinant DNA.

    In the city that gave birth to the celebrity chef, Kogi’s Roy Choi is the culinary star of the moment, with awards and an international renown usually reserved for those who command palaces of cuisine. His success has inspired fleets of similar trucks, with followings for their sushi, dim sum, Brazilian barbecue, Greek sausages, red velvet pancakes, Vietnamese sandwiches, cupcakes, Indian dosas, Filipino halo-halo, Texas barbecue and any of a hundred other things. You can wander between dozens of them on the streets near the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Yahoo offices, Venice boutiques or the UCLA dorms.

  4. author
    purplecat228 18 Jan 2017 05:22

    1. The fast foods we have can give important clues about the nature of American society. 2. The evolution of fast foods can exploit of children s naiveté and trusting nature.

  5. author
    blackelephant855 18 Jan 2017 05:15

    At a time in America when finances are shaky, yet even modest big-city restaurant spaces involve multimillion-dollar build-outs, when consumers have wearied of giant chains but still demand food that is novel, inexpensive and fast, food trucks are the new incubators of culinary innovation. The food-truck phenomenon exploded in cities across the United States last year thanks largely to the success of Kogi, and before that to the mobile fleet of taqueros spread out across L.A. Who knew that the cult of tacos al pastor would become a nationwide sensation?

    Could the new-style trucks thrive in the land of the lonchera? Maybe if they found the right place to park. I drove down to Boyle Heights to look for Ortega. It wasn’t hard. He was in his usual location, across the street from the oldest garden-apartment complex in L.A., and his two daughters were minding the clean, if battered, seafood truck. I inhaled a shrimp taco before I even said hello.

    Michael Specter has been a staff writer at The New Yorker since 1998, and has written frequently about AIDS, T.B., and malaria in the developing world, as well as about agricultural biotechnology, avian influenza, the world’s diminishing freshwater resources, and synthetic biology.

    A couple of months ago, I dropped by Pollo Tropical, a Caribbean-style fast-food joint on Westheimer, to try out its latest product for my Drive-Thru Gourmet column.

    Most fast foods are polar opposites of healthy foods. Fast foods are high in trans fats, sugar and sodium, which can lead to obesity, heart disease and diabetes among other health problems. Healthy foods, by contrast, are high in vitamins, minerals, healthy fats and protein, and they promote energy, good health and longevity.

    The key differences between fast foods and health foods have to do with the processing that fast foods go through along with the added fat, trans fat, sugar and sodium. These characteristics are responsible for increased rates of obesity, heart disease, diabetes and stroke. Foods found in nature -- when consumed in their unadulterated forms -- provide nutrients that promote good health and vitality without the excess calories or unhealthy additives.

  6. author
    User1490824044 18 Jan 2017 06:40

    At a time in America when finances are shaky, yet even modest big-city restaurant spaces involve multimillion-dollar build-outs, when consumers have wearied of giant chains but still demand food that is novel, inexpensive and fast, food trucks are the new incubators of culinary innovation. The food-truck phenomenon exploded in cities across the United States last year thanks largely to the success of Kogi, and before that to the mobile fleet of taqueros spread out across L.A. Who knew that the cult of tacos al pastor would become a nationwide sensation?

    Could the new-style trucks thrive in the land of the lonchera? Maybe if they found the right place to park. I drove down to Boyle Heights to look for Ortega. It wasn’t hard. He was in his usual location, across the street from the oldest garden-apartment complex in L.A., and his two daughters were minding the clean, if battered, seafood truck. I inhaled a shrimp taco before I even said hello.

    Michael Specter has been a staff writer at The New Yorker since 1998, and has written frequently about AIDS, T.B., and malaria in the developing world, as well as about agricultural biotechnology, avian influenza, the world’s diminishing freshwater resources, and synthetic biology.

    A couple of months ago, I dropped by Pollo Tropical, a Caribbean-style fast-food joint on Westheimer, to try out its latest product for my Drive-Thru Gourmet column.

    Most fast foods are polar opposites of healthy foods. Fast foods are high in trans fats, sugar and sodium, which can lead to obesity, heart disease and diabetes among other health problems. Healthy foods, by contrast, are high in vitamins, minerals, healthy fats and protein, and they promote energy, good health and longevity.

    The key differences between fast foods and health foods have to do with the processing that fast foods go through along with the added fat, trans fat, sugar and sodium. These characteristics are responsible for increased rates of obesity, heart disease, diabetes and stroke. Foods found in nature -- when consumed in their unadulterated forms -- provide nutrients that promote good health and vitality without the excess calories or unhealthy additives.

    Cooking is one of the oldest of human activities. When human evolution was at the hunter-gatherer stage, cooking was very simple -- kill something, throw it on the fire along with whatever vegetables and fruits were found that day, and eat. Spices and cooking equipment were rather simple at that time and there probably was not much variety in the average diet back then. Since those very early beginnings, cooking has become almost an art form but still remains a fundamental part of our everyday lives.

    Although many Asian cultures share the tradition of gathering the family or clan together to socialize or celebrate over a big meal, the various cultures of Asia each developed their own ethnic cuisine through the interaction of history, environment, and culture. Culinary historians and anthropologists tend to identified three main categories of Asian dietary cultures that have developed through the centuries. As with virtually any classification system, there is some overlap, but they roughly represent to the main groups or types of traditional Asian cooking.

  7. author
    lazyleopard896 18 Jan 2017 04:26

    Acouple of months ago, I dropped by Pollo Tropical, a Caribbean-style fast-food joint on Westheimer, to try out its latest product for my Drive-Thru.

  8. author
    purplerabbit281 18 Jan 2017 03:16

    At a time in America when finances are shaky, yet even modest big-city restaurant spaces involve multimillion-dollar build-outs, when consumers have wearied of giant chains but still demand food that is novel, inexpensive and fast, food trucks are the new incubators of culinary innovation. The food-truck phenomenon exploded in cities across the United States last year thanks largely to the success of Kogi, and before that to the mobile fleet of taqueros spread out across L.A. Who knew that the cult of tacos al pastor would become a nationwide sensation?

    Could the new-style trucks thrive in the land of the lonchera? Maybe if they found the right place to park. I drove down to Boyle Heights to look for Ortega. It wasn’t hard. He was in his usual location, across the street from the oldest garden-apartment complex in L.A., and his two daughters were minding the clean, if battered, seafood truck. I inhaled a shrimp taco before I even said hello.

    Michael Specter has been a staff writer at The New Yorker since 1998, and has written frequently about AIDS, T.B., and malaria in the developing world, as well as about agricultural biotechnology, avian influenza, the world’s diminishing freshwater resources, and synthetic biology.

    A couple of months ago, I dropped by Pollo Tropical, a Caribbean-style fast-food joint on Westheimer, to try out its latest product for my Drive-Thru Gourmet column.

  9. author
    Х Пертова Х 18 Jan 2017 04:39

    At a time in America when finances are shaky, yet even modest big-city restaurant spaces involve multimillion-dollar build-outs, when consumers have wearied of giant chains but still demand food that is novel, inexpensive and fast, food trucks are the new incubators of culinary innovation. The food-truck phenomenon exploded in cities across the United States last year thanks largely to the success of Kogi, and before that to the mobile fleet of taqueros spread out across L.A. Who knew that the cult of tacos al pastor would become a nationwide sensation?

    Could the new-style trucks thrive in the land of the lonchera? Maybe if they found the right place to park. I drove down to Boyle Heights to look for Ortega. It wasn’t hard. He was in his usual location, across the street from the oldest garden-apartment complex in L.A., and his two daughters were minding the clean, if battered, seafood truck. I inhaled a shrimp taco before I even said hello.