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The Importance Of Being Earnest - Essays - Essays24.com

18 Jan 2017 21:24 | Author: User1492046536 | Category: Resume references how many

The Importance of Being Earnest, A Trivial Comedy for Serious People is a play by Oscar Wilde. First performed on 14 February 1895 at the St James's Theatre in London, it is a farcical comedy in which the protagonists maintain fictitious personæ to escape burdensome social obligations. Working within the social conventions of late Victorian London, the play's major themes are the triviality with which it treats institutions as serious as marriage, and the resulting satire of Victorian ways. Contemporary reviews all praised the play's humour, though some were cautious about its explicit lack of social messages, while others foresaw the modern consensus that it was the culmination of Wilde's artistic career so far. Its high farce and witty dialogue have helped make The Importance of Being Earnest Wilde's most enduringly popular play.

The successful opening night marked the climax of Wilde's career but also heralded his downfall. The Marquess of Queensberry , whose son Lord Alfred Douglas was Wilde's lover, planned to present the writer with a bouquet of rotten vegetables and disrupt the show. Wilde was tipped off and Queensberry was refused admission. Soon afterwards their feud came to a climax in court, where Wilde's homosexual double life was revealed to the Victorian public and he was eventually sentenced to imprisonment. His notoriety caused the play, despite its early success, to be closed after 86 performances. After his release, he published the play from exile in Paris, but he wrote no further comic or dramatic work.

Comments
  1. author
    User1490085020 18 Jan 2017 00:09

    Check out Sparknotes and Shmoop.com for study guides on the play, and find out what irony means.

  2. author
    User1490533924 18 Jan 2017 05:08

    Oscar Wilde frames "The Importance of Being Earnest" around the paradoxical epigram, a skewering metaphor for the play's central theme of division of truth and identity that hints at a homosexual subtext. Other targets of Wilde's absurd yet.

    In the closing lines of the first act of Oscar Wilde's "The Importance of Being Earnest," Algernon remarks, "I love scrapes. They are the only things that are never serious," to which Jack responds, "Oh, that's nonsense Algy. You never talk about.

  3. author
    User1491911224 18 Jan 2017 08:22

    Oscar Wilde frames "The Importance of Being Earnest" around the paradoxical epigram, a skewering metaphor for the play''s central theme of division of truth and identity that hints at a homosexual subtext. Other targets of Wilde''s absurd yet.

    In the closing lines of the first act of Oscar Wilde''s "The Importance of Being Earnest," Algernon remarks, "I love scrapes. They are the only things that are never serious," to which Jack responds, "Oh, that''s nonsense Algy. You never talk about.

    These biographical details are closely connected with the art of Wilde and with The Importance of Being Earnest , a play in which a number of the characters lead double lives. The play’s characters, too, let truths slip out while pretending to be engaged in social chitchat. They are adroit at saying and doing two opposing things at once, and they are virtuosic in their use of language. Nearly all the humor in the play depends on these devices.

    The plot of The Importance of Being Earnest hinges on mistaken identity, as many plots do, though not many do so to such comic effect. What is funny about the play is that the audience realizes that the characters could easily be someone quite other than who they seem. It is no wonder that audiences continue to love the play: Its humor is intoxicating, and its critique of society is breathtaking.

  4. author
    orangewolf681 18 Jan 2017 03:59

    Read through the themes and sample essays on "The Importance of Being Ernest" on SparkNotes.

  5. author
    BurrisJones 18 Jan 2017 03:22

    This site should help. http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/earnest/

  6. author
    tinyswan627 17 Jan 2017 23:51

    Oscar Wilde frames "The Importance of Being Earnest" around the paradoxical epigram, a skewering metaphor for the play''''s central theme of division of truth and identity that hints at a homosexual subtext. Other targets of Wilde''''s absurd yet.

    In the closing lines of the first act of Oscar Wilde''''s "The Importance of Being Earnest," Algernon remarks, "I love scrapes. They are the only things that are never serious," to which Jack responds, "Oh, that''''s nonsense Algy. You never talk about.

    These biographical details are closely connected with the art of Wilde and with The Importance of Being Earnest , a play in which a number of the characters lead double lives. The play’s characters, too, let truths slip out while pretending to be engaged in social chitchat. They are adroit at saying and doing two opposing things at once, and they are virtuosic in their use of language. Nearly all the humor in the play depends on these devices.

    The plot of The Importance of Being Earnest hinges on mistaken identity, as many plots do, though not many do so to such comic effect. What is funny about the play is that the audience realizes that the characters could easily be someone quite other than who they seem. It is no wonder that audiences continue to love the play: Its humor is intoxicating, and its critique of society is breathtaking.