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Do Kids Try to waste their life on trying to get a reputation.?

18 Jan 2017 21:24 | Author: reddog153 | Category: Example cover letter for psychologist

Top Articles. High-and Moderate-Potassium Foods Kidney Disease: High- and Moderate-Potassium Foods; 4 Types of Foods to Help Boost Your Memory 4 Types of Foods to.

Comments
  1. author
    goldenfrog198 18 Jan 2017 04:29

    When we scrape off our dishes after a large meal, too full to finish the remaining scraps on our plate, we rarely pause and think about the significance of our action. It seems routine to us: if we have leftover food scraps that are unfit for eating, shouldn’t they be thrown in the garbage? Our routine practices, unfortunately, make it difficult for us to conceptualize the magnitude of global food waste.  The problem is bigger than we think.

    According to a recent report by UNEP and the World Resources Institute (WRI), about one-third of all food produced worldwide, worth around US$1 trillion, gets lost or wasted in food production and consumption systems. When this figure is converted to calories, this means that about 1 in 4 calories intended for consumption is never actually eaten. In a world full of hunger, volatile food prices , and social unrest, these statistics are more than just shocking:  they are environmentally, morally and economically outrageous.

    Ah, childhood meals: Flinging peas at your sister, hiding more peas under the mashed potatoes, and being scolded by an adult for avoiding the consumption of said peas — “Clean your plate! There are starving kids in Africa.” At a young age, we learned to feel guilty for wasting food while other people don’t have any. And maybe we should. Because here’s something astounding: The amount of food waste produced globally each year is more than enough to feed the nearly 1 billion hungry people in the world.

    But does that mean we should stuff ourselves even when we’re full? Nope, that’s not helping anybody. So what’s a pea-hating child-turned-adult to do?

    The Natural Resources Defense Council works to safeguard the earth - its people, its plants and animals, and the natural systems on which all life depends.

    NRDC works to make America''''''''''''''''s food system more efficient and less wasteful. We help cities redirect surplus food to people in need. We inspire consumers to waste less food at home and equip them with the strategies to make it happen. We push the food industry and the federal government to put an end to confusing date labels and adopt other waste-reducing policies. And we work with communities, businesses, and policy makers to support waste reduction, recovery, and composting across the supply chain.

    It’s the end of January and Christmas has left us with tight waistbands and worrying bank balances. To get you through the next week, we have a way for you to eat for free – eat the food you already have.  Most of us have cupboards and freezers filled with food that has already been paid for. The longer it stays there, the less likely we are to use it. This week, while you count down to pay-day, eat the food you have at home! Staying out of the shops will help you save money, save food and leave more time for that new gym-membership, or the.

    Christmas is a lovely time of the year but also a time when there can be lots of wasted food. More food is thrown out during the festive season than at any other time of the year. Buying too much can have a big impact on your pocket and if this food becomes waste well then, who’s the turkey? With a little forward planning, and watching out for some of the key foods that are wasted, a lot of this food waste can be avoided. One of the main areas to be careful is in the supermarket. Trying to avoid over spending and overfilling your fridge at Christmas can.

    To better understand community knowledge, attitudes and behaviours about household food waste, 1,200 NSW households were surveyed as part of the ‘Food Waste Avoidance Benchmark Study’. This NSW Government study was the most comprehensive analysis of community knowledge, attitudes and behaviours yet conducted in Australia about food waste.

    As a result of this study, NSW Government stats from ‘Love Food Hate Waste’ estimate that the average NSW household throws out $1,036 of food every year.

    Did you know that tonnes of perfectly good food is thrown away every day in some countries? When some people don't have enough food to eat it seems crazy that so much food is wasted. Watch this video and learn about the work that Tristram Stuart is doing to try and change this situation. 

    Do the preparation task first. Then watch the video and do the exercise. Remember you can read the transcript at any time.

  2. author
    greentiger325 18 Jan 2017 04:55

    When we scrape off our dishes after a large meal, too full to finish the remaining scraps on our plate, we rarely pause and think about the significance of our action. It seems routine to us: if we have leftover food scraps that are unfit for eating, shouldn’t they be thrown in the garbage? Our routine practices, unfortunately, make it difficult for us to conceptualize the magnitude of global food waste.  The problem is bigger than we think.

    According to a recent report by UNEP and the World Resources Institute (WRI), about one-third of all food produced worldwide, worth around US$1 trillion, gets lost or wasted in food production and consumption systems. When this figure is converted to calories, this means that about 1 in 4 calories intended for consumption is never actually eaten. In a world full of hunger, volatile food prices , and social unrest, these statistics are more than just shocking:  they are environmentally, morally and economically outrageous.

    Ah, childhood meals: Flinging peas at your sister, hiding more peas under the mashed potatoes, and being scolded by an adult for avoiding the consumption of said peas — “Clean your plate! There are starving kids in Africa.” At a young age, we learned to feel guilty for wasting food while other people don’t have any. And maybe we should. Because here’s something astounding: The amount of food waste produced globally each year is more than enough to feed the nearly 1 billion hungry people in the world .

    But does that mean we should stuff ourselves even when we’re full? Nope, that’s not helping anybody. So what’s a pea-hating child-turned-adult to do?

  3. author
    TAKEHIRO 18 Jan 2017 07:00

    When we scrape off our dishes after a large meal, too full to finish the remaining scraps on our plate, we rarely pause and think about the significance of our action. It seems routine to us: if we have leftover food scraps that are unfit for eating, shouldn’t they be thrown in the garbage? Our routine practices, unfortunately, make it difficult for us to conceptualize the magnitude of global food waste.  The problem is bigger than we think.

    According to a recent report by UNEP and the World Resources Institute (WRI), about one-third of all food produced worldwide, worth around US$1 trillion, gets lost or wasted in food production and consumption systems. When this figure is converted to calories, this means that about 1 in 4 calories intended for consumption is never actually eaten. In a world full of hunger, volatile food prices , and social unrest, these statistics are more than just shocking:  they are environmentally, morally and economically outrageous.

    Ah, childhood meals: Flinging peas at your sister, hiding more peas under the mashed potatoes, and being scolded by an adult for avoiding the consumption of said peas — “Clean your plate! There are starving kids in Africa.” At a young age, we learned to feel guilty for wasting food while other people don’t have any. And maybe we should. Because here’s something astounding: The amount of food waste produced globally each year is more than enough to feed the nearly 1 billion hungry people in the world.

    But does that mean we should stuff ourselves even when we’re full? Nope, that’s not helping anybody. So what’s a pea-hating child-turned-adult to do?

    The Natural Resources Defense Council works to safeguard the earth - its people, its plants and animals, and the natural systems on which all life depends.

    NRDC works to make America''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s food system more efficient and less wasteful. We help cities redirect surplus food to people in need. We inspire consumers to waste less food at home and equip them with the strategies to make it happen. We push the food industry and the federal government to put an end to confusing date labels and adopt other waste-reducing policies. And we work with communities, businesses, and policy makers to support waste reduction, recovery, and composting across the supply chain.

    It’s the end of January and Christmas has left us with tight waistbands and worrying bank balances. To get you through the next week, we have a way for you to eat for free – eat the food you already have.  Most of us have cupboards and freezers filled with food that has already been paid for. The longer it stays there, the less likely we are to use it. This week, while you count down to pay-day, eat the food you have at home! Staying out of the shops will help you save money, save food and leave more time for that new gym-membership, or the.

    Christmas is a lovely time of the year but also a time when there can be lots of wasted food. More food is thrown out during the festive season than at any other time of the year. Buying too much can have a big impact on your pocket and if this food becomes waste well then, who’s the turkey? With a little forward planning, and watching out for some of the key foods that are wasted, a lot of this food waste can be avoided. One of the main areas to be careful is in the supermarket. Trying to avoid over spending and overfilling your fridge at Christmas can.

    To better understand community knowledge, attitudes and behaviours about household food waste, 1,200 NSW households were surveyed as part of the ‘Food Waste Avoidance Benchmark Study’. This NSW Government study was the most comprehensive analysis of community knowledge, attitudes and behaviours yet conducted in Australia about food waste.

    As a result of this study, NSW Government stats from ‘Love Food Hate Waste’ estimate that the average NSW household throws out $1,036 of food every year.

    Did you know that tonnes of perfectly good food is thrown away every day in some countries? When some people don''t have enough food to eat it seems crazy that so much food is wasted. Watch this video and learn about the work that Tristram Stuart is doing to try and change this situation. 

    Do the preparation task first. Then watch the video and do the exercise. Remember you can read the transcript at any time.

    You're eating local, maybe organic, or even growing your own food. Make sure you don't end up throwing out the fruits and vegetables of your hard-earned labour. Besides being a waste of money, time and energy, unused food that ends up in landfills is one of the main sources of greenhouse gases.

  4. author
    beautifulostrich559 18 Jan 2017 04:15

    These foods look perfectly delicious, thanks to the work of a food stylist. Food stylists are like make-up artists. It's their job to make the food you see in.

  5. author
    User1488521303 18 Jan 2017 07:14

    When we scrape off our dishes after a large meal, too full to finish the remaining scraps on our plate, we rarely pause and think about the significance of our action. It seems routine to us: if we have leftover food scraps that are unfit for eating, shouldn’t they be thrown in the garbage? Our routine practices, unfortunately, make it difficult for us to conceptualize the magnitude of global food waste.  The problem is bigger than we think.

    According to a recent report by UNEP and the World Resources Institute (WRI), about one-third of all food produced worldwide, worth around US$1 trillion, gets lost or wasted in food production and consumption systems. When this figure is converted to calories, this means that about 1 in 4 calories intended for consumption is never actually eaten. In a world full of hunger, volatile food prices , and social unrest, these statistics are more than just shocking:  they are environmentally, morally and economically outrageous.

    Ah, childhood meals: Flinging peas at your sister, hiding more peas under the mashed potatoes, and being scolded by an adult for avoiding the consumption of said peas — “Clean your plate! There are starving kids in Africa.” At a young age, we learned to feel guilty for wasting food while other people don’t have any. And maybe we should. Because here’s something astounding: The amount of food waste produced globally each year is more than enough to feed the nearly 1 billion hungry people in the world.

    But does that mean we should stuff ourselves even when we’re full? Nope, that’s not helping anybody. So what’s a pea-hating child-turned-adult to do?

    The Natural Resources Defense Council works to safeguard the earth - its people, its plants and animals, and the natural systems on which all life depends.

    NRDC works to make America's food system more efficient and less wasteful. We help cities redirect surplus food to people in need. We inspire consumers to waste less food at home and equip them with the strategies to make it happen. We push the food industry and the federal government to put an end to confusing date labels and adopt other waste-reducing policies. And we work with communities, businesses, and policy makers to support waste reduction, recovery, and composting across the supply chain.

  6. author
    User1488968430 18 Jan 2017 00:01

    When we scrape off our dishes after a large meal, too full to finish the remaining scraps on our plate, we rarely pause and think about the significance of our action. It seems routine to us: if we have leftover food scraps that are unfit for eating, shouldn’t they be thrown in the garbage? Our routine practices, unfortunately, make it difficult for us to conceptualize the magnitude of global food waste.  The problem is bigger than we think.

    According to a recent report by UNEP and the World Resources Institute (WRI), about one-third of all food produced worldwide, worth around US$1 trillion, gets lost or wasted in food production and consumption systems. When this figure is converted to calories, this means that about 1 in 4 calories intended for consumption is never actually eaten. In a world full of hunger, volatile food prices , and social unrest, these statistics are more than just shocking:  they are environmentally, morally and economically outrageous.

    Ah, childhood meals: Flinging peas at your sister, hiding more peas under the mashed potatoes, and being scolded by an adult for avoiding the consumption of said peas — “Clean your plate! There are starving kids in Africa.” At a young age, we learned to feel guilty for wasting food while other people don’t have any. And maybe we should. Because here’s something astounding: The amount of food waste produced globally each year is more than enough to feed the nearly 1 billion hungry people in the world.

    But does that mean we should stuff ourselves even when we’re full? Nope, that’s not helping anybody. So what’s a pea-hating child-turned-adult to do?

    The Natural Resources Defense Council works to safeguard the earth - its people, its plants and animals, and the natural systems on which all life depends.

    NRDC works to make America''''s food system more efficient and less wasteful. We help cities redirect surplus food to people in need. We inspire consumers to waste less food at home and equip them with the strategies to make it happen. We push the food industry and the federal government to put an end to confusing date labels and adopt other waste-reducing policies. And we work with communities, businesses, and policy makers to support waste reduction, recovery, and composting across the supply chain.

    It’s the end of January and Christmas has left us with tight waistbands and worrying bank balances. To get you through the next week, we have a way for you to eat for free – eat the food you already have.  Most of us have cupboards and freezers filled with food that has already been paid for. The longer it stays there, the less likely we are to use it. This week, while you count down to pay-day, eat the food you have at home! Staying out of the shops will help you save money, save food and leave more time for that new gym-membership, or the.

    Christmas is a lovely time of the year but also a time when there can be lots of wasted food. More food is thrown out during the festive season than at any other time of the year. Buying too much can have a big impact on your pocket and if this food becomes waste well then, who’s the turkey? With a little forward planning, and watching out for some of the key foods that are wasted, a lot of this food waste can be avoided. One of the main areas to be careful is in the supermarket. Trying to avoid over spending and overfilling your fridge at Christmas can.

    To better understand community knowledge, attitudes and behaviours about household food waste, 1,200 NSW households were surveyed as part of the ‘Food Waste Avoidance Benchmark Study’. This NSW Government study was the most comprehensive analysis of community knowledge, attitudes and behaviours yet conducted in Australia about food waste.

    As a result of this study, NSW Government stats from ‘Love Food Hate Waste’ estimate that the average NSW household throws out $1,036 of food every year.

  7. author
    User1491338868 18 Jan 2017 04:13

    Click here essay on food waste for kids

    Top Articles. High-and Moderate-Potassium Foods Kidney Disease: High- and Moderate-Potassium Foods; 4 Types of Foods to Help Boost Your Memory 4 Types of Foods to.

  8. author
    bluedog645 18 Jan 2017 04:11

    When we scrape off our dishes after a large meal, too full to finish the remaining scraps on our plate, we rarely pause and think about the significance of our action. It seems routine to us: if we have leftover food scraps that are unfit for eating, shouldn’t they be thrown in the garbage? Our routine practices, unfortunately, make it difficult for us to conceptualize the magnitude of global food waste.  The problem is bigger than we think.

    According to a recent report by UNEP and the World Resources Institute (WRI), about one-third of all food produced worldwide, worth around US$1 trillion, gets lost or wasted in food production and consumption systems. When this figure is converted to calories, this means that about 1 in 4 calories intended for consumption is never actually eaten. In a world full of hunger, volatile food prices , and social unrest, these statistics are more than just shocking:  they are environmentally, morally and economically outrageous.

  9. author
    blueleopard311 17 Jan 2017 22:51

    When we scrape off our dishes after a large meal, too full to finish the remaining scraps on our plate, we rarely pause and think about the significance of our action. It seems routine to us: if we have leftover food scraps that are unfit for eating, shouldn’t they be thrown in the garbage? Our routine practices, unfortunately, make it difficult for us to conceptualize the magnitude of global food waste.  The problem is bigger than we think.

    According to a recent report by UNEP and the World Resources Institute (WRI), about one-third of all food produced worldwide, worth around US$1 trillion, gets lost or wasted in food production and consumption systems. When this figure is converted to calories, this means that about 1 in 4 calories intended for consumption is never actually eaten. In a world full of hunger, volatile food prices , and social unrest, these statistics are more than just shocking:  they are environmentally, morally and economically outrageous.

    Ah, childhood meals: Flinging peas at your sister, hiding more peas under the mashed potatoes, and being scolded by an adult for avoiding the consumption of said peas — “Clean your plate! There are starving kids in Africa.” At a young age, we learned to feel guilty for wasting food while other people don’t have any. And maybe we should. Because here’s something astounding: The amount of food waste produced globally each year is more than enough to feed the nearly 1 billion hungry people in the world.

    But does that mean we should stuff ourselves even when we’re full? Nope, that’s not helping anybody. So what’s a pea-hating child-turned-adult to do?

    The Natural Resources Defense Council works to safeguard the earth - its people, its plants and animals, and the natural systems on which all life depends.

    NRDC works to make America''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s food system more efficient and less wasteful. We help cities redirect surplus food to people in need. We inspire consumers to waste less food at home and equip them with the strategies to make it happen. We push the food industry and the federal government to put an end to confusing date labels and adopt other waste-reducing policies. And we work with communities, businesses, and policy makers to support waste reduction, recovery, and composting across the supply chain.

    It’s the end of January and Christmas has left us with tight waistbands and worrying bank balances. To get you through the next week, we have a way for you to eat for free – eat the food you already have.  Most of us have cupboards and freezers filled with food that has already been paid for. The longer it stays there, the less likely we are to use it. This week, while you count down to pay-day, eat the food you have at home! Staying out of the shops will help you save money, save food and leave more time for that new gym-membership, or the.

    Christmas is a lovely time of the year but also a time when there can be lots of wasted food. More food is thrown out during the festive season than at any other time of the year. Buying too much can have a big impact on your pocket and if this food becomes waste well then, who’s the turkey? With a little forward planning, and watching out for some of the key foods that are wasted, a lot of this food waste can be avoided. One of the main areas to be careful is in the supermarket. Trying to avoid over spending and overfilling your fridge at Christmas can.

    To better understand community knowledge, attitudes and behaviours about household food waste, 1,200 NSW households were surveyed as part of the ‘Food Waste Avoidance Benchmark Study’. This NSW Government study was the most comprehensive analysis of community knowledge, attitudes and behaviours yet conducted in Australia about food waste.

    As a result of this study, NSW Government stats from ‘Love Food Hate Waste’ estimate that the average NSW household throws out $1,036 of food every year.

    Did you know that tonnes of perfectly good food is thrown away every day in some countries? When some people don''''''''t have enough food to eat it seems crazy that so much food is wasted. Watch this video and learn about the work that Tristram Stuart is doing to try and change this situation. 

    Do the preparation task first. Then watch the video and do the exercise. Remember you can read the transcript at any time.

    You''''re eating local, maybe organic, or even growing your own food. Make sure you don''''t end up throwing out the fruits and vegetables of your hard-earned labour. Besides being a waste of money, time and energy, unused food that ends up in landfills is one of the main sources of greenhouse gases.

  10. author
    User1487736309 18 Jan 2017 02:12

    When we scrape off our dishes after a large meal, too full to finish the remaining scraps on our plate, we rarely pause and think about the significance of our action. It seems routine to us: if we have leftover food scraps that are unfit for eating, shouldn’t they be thrown in the garbage? Our routine practices, unfortunately, make it difficult for us to conceptualize the magnitude of global food waste.  The problem is bigger than we think.

    According to a recent report by UNEP and the World Resources Institute (WRI), about one-third of all food produced worldwide, worth around US$1 trillion, gets lost or wasted in food production and consumption systems. When this figure is converted to calories, this means that about 1 in 4 calories intended for consumption is never actually eaten. In a world full of hunger, volatile food prices , and social unrest, these statistics are more than just shocking:  they are environmentally, morally and economically outrageous.

    Ah, childhood meals: Flinging peas at your sister, hiding more peas under the mashed potatoes, and being scolded by an adult for avoiding the consumption of said peas — “Clean your plate! There are starving kids in Africa.” At a young age, we learned to feel guilty for wasting food while other people don’t have any. And maybe we should. Because here’s something astounding: The amount of food waste produced globally each year is more than enough to feed the nearly 1 billion hungry people in the world.

    But does that mean we should stuff ourselves even when we’re full? Nope, that’s not helping anybody. So what’s a pea-hating child-turned-adult to do?

    The Natural Resources Defense Council works to safeguard the earth - its people, its plants and animals, and the natural systems on which all life depends.

    NRDC works to make America''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s food system more efficient and less wasteful. We help cities redirect surplus food to people in need. We inspire consumers to waste less food at home and equip them with the strategies to make it happen. We push the food industry and the federal government to put an end to confusing date labels and adopt other waste-reducing policies. And we work with communities, businesses, and policy makers to support waste reduction, recovery, and composting across the supply chain.

    It’s the end of January and Christmas has left us with tight waistbands and worrying bank balances. To get you through the next week, we have a way for you to eat for free – eat the food you already have.  Most of us have cupboards and freezers filled with food that has already been paid for. The longer it stays there, the less likely we are to use it. This week, while you count down to pay-day, eat the food you have at home! Staying out of the shops will help you save money, save food and leave more time for that new gym-membership, or the.

    Christmas is a lovely time of the year but also a time when there can be lots of wasted food. More food is thrown out during the festive season than at any other time of the year. Buying too much can have a big impact on your pocket and if this food becomes waste well then, who’s the turkey? With a little forward planning, and watching out for some of the key foods that are wasted, a lot of this food waste can be avoided. One of the main areas to be careful is in the supermarket. Trying to avoid over spending and overfilling your fridge at Christmas can.

    To better understand community knowledge, attitudes and behaviours about household food waste, 1,200 NSW households were surveyed as part of the ‘Food Waste Avoidance Benchmark Study’. This NSW Government study was the most comprehensive analysis of community knowledge, attitudes and behaviours yet conducted in Australia about food waste.

    As a result of this study, NSW Government stats from ‘Love Food Hate Waste’ estimate that the average NSW household throws out $1,036 of food every year.

    Did you know that tonnes of perfectly good food is thrown away every day in some countries? When some people don''''t have enough food to eat it seems crazy that so much food is wasted. Watch this video and learn about the work that Tristram Stuart is doing to try and change this situation. 

    Do the preparation task first. Then watch the video and do the exercise. Remember you can read the transcript at any time.

    You''re eating local, maybe organic, or even growing your own food. Make sure you don''t end up throwing out the fruits and vegetables of your hard-earned labour. Besides being a waste of money, time and energy, unused food that ends up in landfills is one of the main sources of greenhouse gases.

  11. author
    н к р 18 Jan 2017 06:57

    When we scrape off our dishes after a large meal, too full to finish the remaining scraps on our plate, we rarely pause and think about the significance of our action. It seems routine to us: if we have leftover food scraps that are unfit for eating, shouldn’t they be thrown in the garbage? Our routine practices, unfortunately, make it difficult for us to conceptualize the magnitude of global food waste.  The problem is bigger than we think.

    According to a recent report by UNEP and the World Resources Institute (WRI), about one-third of all food produced worldwide, worth around US$1 trillion, gets lost or wasted in food production and consumption systems. When this figure is converted to calories, this means that about 1 in 4 calories intended for consumption is never actually eaten. In a world full of hunger, volatile food prices , and social unrest, these statistics are more than just shocking:  they are environmentally, morally and economically outrageous.

    Ah, childhood meals: Flinging peas at your sister, hiding more peas under the mashed potatoes, and being scolded by an adult for avoiding the consumption of said peas — “Clean your plate! There are starving kids in Africa.” At a young age, we learned to feel guilty for wasting food while other people don’t have any. And maybe we should. Because here’s something astounding: The amount of food waste produced globally each year is more than enough to feed the nearly 1 billion hungry people in the world.

    But does that mean we should stuff ourselves even when we’re full? Nope, that’s not helping anybody. So what’s a pea-hating child-turned-adult to do?

    The Natural Resources Defense Council works to safeguard the earth - its people, its plants and animals, and the natural systems on which all life depends.

    NRDC works to make America''s food system more efficient and less wasteful. We help cities redirect surplus food to people in need. We inspire consumers to waste less food at home and equip them with the strategies to make it happen. We push the food industry and the federal government to put an end to confusing date labels and adopt other waste-reducing policies. And we work with communities, businesses, and policy makers to support waste reduction, recovery, and composting across the supply chain.

    It’s the end of January and Christmas has left us with tight waistbands and worrying bank balances. To get you through the next week, we have a way for you to eat for free – eat the food you already have.  Most of us have cupboards and freezers filled with food that has already been paid for. The longer it stays there, the less likely we are to use it. This week, while you count down to pay-day, eat the food you have at home! Staying out of the shops will help you save money, save food and leave more time for that new gym-membership, or the.

    Christmas is a lovely time of the year but also a time when there can be lots of wasted food. More food is thrown out during the festive season than at any other time of the year. Buying too much can have a big impact on your pocket and if this food becomes waste well then, who’s the turkey? With a little forward planning, and watching out for some of the key foods that are wasted, a lot of this food waste can be avoided. One of the main areas to be careful is in the supermarket. Trying to avoid over spending and overfilling your fridge at Christmas can.

  12. author
    purplemeercat945 18 Jan 2017 03:52

    When we scrape off our dishes after a large meal, too full to finish the remaining scraps on our plate, we rarely pause and think about the significance of our action. It seems routine to us: if we have leftover food scraps that are unfit for eating, shouldn’t they be thrown in the garbage? Our routine practices, unfortunately, make it difficult for us to conceptualize the magnitude of global food waste.  The problem is bigger than we think.

    According to a recent report by UNEP and the World Resources Institute (WRI), about one-third of all food produced worldwide, worth around US$1 trillion, gets lost or wasted in food production and consumption systems. When this figure is converted to calories, this means that about 1 in 4 calories intended for consumption is never actually eaten. In a world full of hunger, volatile food prices , and social unrest, these statistics are more than just shocking:  they are environmentally, morally and economically outrageous.

    Ah, childhood meals: Flinging peas at your sister, hiding more peas under the mashed potatoes, and being scolded by an adult for avoiding the consumption of said peas — “Clean your plate! There are starving kids in Africa.” At a young age, we learned to feel guilty for wasting food while other people don’t have any. And maybe we should. Because here’s something astounding: The amount of food waste produced globally each year is more than enough to feed the nearly 1 billion hungry people in the world.

    But does that mean we should stuff ourselves even when we’re full? Nope, that’s not helping anybody. So what’s a pea-hating child-turned-adult to do?

    The Natural Resources Defense Council works to safeguard the earth - its people, its plants and animals, and the natural systems on which all life depends.

    NRDC works to make America''''''''s food system more efficient and less wasteful. We help cities redirect surplus food to people in need. We inspire consumers to waste less food at home and equip them with the strategies to make it happen. We push the food industry and the federal government to put an end to confusing date labels and adopt other waste-reducing policies. And we work with communities, businesses, and policy makers to support waste reduction, recovery, and composting across the supply chain.

    It’s the end of January and Christmas has left us with tight waistbands and worrying bank balances. To get you through the next week, we have a way for you to eat for free – eat the food you already have.  Most of us have cupboards and freezers filled with food that has already been paid for. The longer it stays there, the less likely we are to use it. This week, while you count down to pay-day, eat the food you have at home! Staying out of the shops will help you save money, save food and leave more time for that new gym-membership, or the.

    Christmas is a lovely time of the year but also a time when there can be lots of wasted food. More food is thrown out during the festive season than at any other time of the year. Buying too much can have a big impact on your pocket and if this food becomes waste well then, who’s the turkey? With a little forward planning, and watching out for some of the key foods that are wasted, a lot of this food waste can be avoided. One of the main areas to be careful is in the supermarket. Trying to avoid over spending and overfilling your fridge at Christmas can.

    To better understand community knowledge, attitudes and behaviours about household food waste, 1,200 NSW households were surveyed as part of the ‘Food Waste Avoidance Benchmark Study’. This NSW Government study was the most comprehensive analysis of community knowledge, attitudes and behaviours yet conducted in Australia about food waste.

    As a result of this study, NSW Government stats from ‘Love Food Hate Waste’ estimate that the average NSW household throws out $1,036 of food every year.