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WATE 6 On Your Side

18 Jan 2017 21:24 | Author: User1492059259 | Category: Resume design engineer mechanical

Consequentialism is the class of normative ethical theories holding that the consequences of one's conduct are the ultimate basis for any judgment about the rightness or wrongness of that conduct. Thus, from a consequentialist standpoint, a morally right act (or omission from acting) is one that will produce a good outcome, or consequence. In an extreme form, the idea of consequentialism is commonly encapsulated in the saying , "the end justifies the means ", [1] meaning that if a goal is morally important enough, any method of achieving it is acceptable. [2]

Consequentialism is usually contrasted with deontological ethics (or deontology ), in that deontology, in which rules and moral duty are central, derives the rightness or wrongness of one's conduct from the character of the behaviour itself rather than the outcomes of the conduct. It is also contrasted with virtue ethics , which focuses on the character of the agent rather than on the nature or consequences of the act (or omission) itself, and pragmatic ethics which treats morality like science: advancing socially over the course of many lifetimes, such that any moral criterion is subject to revision. Consequentialist theories differ in how they define moral goods.

Comments
  1. author
    yellowbear975 18 Jan 2017 06:25

    All content on this website, including dictionary, thesaurus, literature, geography, and other reference data is for informational purposes only. This information should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional.

    Widely attributed to Machiavelli ’s The Prince [1] , which does reflect this philosophy but does not use the phrase in this wording. A possible source is Ovid ’s Heroides (ca. 10 BC), which says Exitus acta probat ( “ The result justifies the deeds ” ).

  2. author
    User1488654836 18 Jan 2017 05:12

    All content on this website, including dictionary, thesaurus, literature, geography, and other reference data is for informational purposes only. This information should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional.

    Widely attributed to Machiavelli ’s The Prince [1] , which does reflect this philosophy but does not use the phrase in this wording. A possible source is Ovid ’s Heroides (ca. 10 BC), which says Exitus acta probat ( “ The result justifies the deeds ” ).

    Ethics can be a tricky issue, but it need not be so in many ways. When it is difficult to make a decision it is often not for a lack of information, but because we are lost in a swarm of details and hypotheticals. By isolating the essential details and identifying a moral standard we can come to decisions with clarity and confidence.

    People often say the ends don’t justify the means as if it were a truism. Now, they might have good advice and be correct incidentally , but this truism is totally backwards and confounds ethical reasoning. If the ends don’t justify the means, what does? Asking that question is sure to get a blank stare, because most people haven’t thought about this subject in detail. First what are means and ends?

    Before I began writing this post, I googled "the ends justify the means" and got 204,000 results. The volume of philosophical discourse that's gone into analyzing the implications of the phrase is staggering.

    Frankly, I think it's all a bunch of pseudo-academic crap. It's never acceptable to breach moral, ethical, or legal boundaries to achieve some perceived greater good. But I didn't always think that way.

  3. author
    greentiger272 18 Jan 2017 07:47

    Order essay here does the ends justify the means

    Consequentialism is the class of normative ethical theories holding that the consequences of one''s conduct are the ultimate basis for any judgment about the rightness or wrongness of that conduct. Thus, from a consequentialist standpoint, a morally right act (or omission from acting) is one that will produce a good outcome, or consequence. In an extreme form, the idea of consequentialism is commonly encapsulated in the saying , "the end justifies the means ", [1] meaning that if a goal is morally important enough, any method of achieving it is acceptable. [2]

    Consequentialism is usually contrasted with deontological ethics (or deontology ), in that deontology, in which rules and moral duty are central, derives the rightness or wrongness of one''s conduct from the character of the behaviour itself rather than the outcomes of the conduct. It is also contrasted with virtue ethics , which focuses on the character of the agent rather than on the nature or consequences of the act (or omission) itself, and pragmatic ethics which treats morality like science: advancing socially over the course of many lifetimes, such that any moral criterion is subject to revision. Consequentialist theories differ in how they define moral goods.

  4. author
    User1490706930 18 Jan 2017 04:27

    The earliest instance of this phrase that I can remember is in Shakespeare s Macbeth. Nowadays, you ll see the word justified very often in conjunction and it is a very hefty and dramatic thing to say, namely, "do the ends justify the means?" The "means" are the tools used to reach the goal, or "end."

  5. author
    User1489291034 18 Jan 2017 08:49

    All content on this website, including dictionary, thesaurus, literature, geography, and other reference data is for informational purposes only. This information should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional.

    Widely attributed to Machiavelli ’s The Prince [1] , which does reflect this philosophy but does not use the phrase in this wording. A possible source is Ovid ’s Heroides (ca. 10 BC), which says Exitus acta probat ( “ The result justifies the deeds ” ).

    Ethics can be a tricky issue, but it need not be so in many ways. When it is difficult to make a decision it is often not for a lack of information, but because we are lost in a swarm of details and hypotheticals. By isolating the essential details and identifying a moral standard we can come to decisions with clarity and confidence.

    People often say the ends don’t justify the means as if it were a truism. Now, they might have good advice and be correct incidentally , but this truism is totally backwards and confounds ethical reasoning. If the ends don’t justify the means, what does? Asking that question is sure to get a blank stare, because most people haven’t thought about this subject in detail. First what are means and ends?

    Before I began writing this post, I googled "the ends justify the means" and got 204,000 results. The volume of philosophical discourse that''s gone into analyzing the implications of the phrase is staggering.

    Frankly, I think it''s all a bunch of pseudo-academic crap. It''s never acceptable to breach moral, ethical, or legal boundaries to achieve some perceived greater good. But I didn''t always think that way.

    Consequentialism is the class of normative ethical theories holding that the consequences of one's conduct are the ultimate basis for any judgment about the rightness or wrongness of that conduct. Thus, from a consequentialist standpoint, a morally right act (or omission from acting) is one that will produce a good outcome, or consequence. In an extreme form, the idea of consequentialism is commonly encapsulated in the saying , "the end justifies the means ", [1] meaning that if a goal is morally important enough, any method of achieving it is acceptable. [2]

    Some argue that consequentialist and deontological theories are not necessarily mutually exclusive. For example, T. M. Scanlon advances the idea that human rights , which are commonly considered a "deontological" concept, can only be justified with reference to the consequences of having those rights. [3] Similarly, Robert Nozick argues for a theory that is mostly consequentialist, but incorporates inviolable "side-constraints" which restrict the sort of actions agents are permitted to do. [3]

  6. author
    organicmouse302 18 Jan 2017 09:19

    When at the end of your day and you lay your head down to say, all is well in the world. The means for which you were able to understand how it is you can say this, then you will know.

  7. author
    BurkeBoyle 18 Jan 2017 02:11

    All content on this website, including dictionary, thesaurus, literature, geography, and other reference data is for informational purposes only. This information should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional.

    Widely attributed to Machiavelli ’s The Prince [1] , which does reflect this philosophy but does not use the phrase in this wording. A possible source is Ovid ’s Heroides (ca. 10 BC), which says Exitus acta probat ( “ The result justifies the deeds ” ).

    Ethics can be a tricky issue, but it need not be so in many ways. When it is difficult to make a decision it is often not for a lack of information, but because we are lost in a swarm of details and hypotheticals. By isolating the essential details and identifying a moral standard we can come to decisions with clarity and confidence.

    People often say the ends don’t justify the means as if it were a truism. Now, they might have good advice and be correct incidentally , but this truism is totally backwards and confounds ethical reasoning. If the ends don’t justify the means, what does? Asking that question is sure to get a blank stare, because most people haven’t thought about this subject in detail. First what are means and ends?

  8. author
    Stasya 18 Jan 2017 08:53

    Sure. Let s say someone stabs me with a knife. Terrible means! But let s also say she s a surgeon performing a life saving operation on me, which is why she plunges the knife into me. Worthwhile ends! There ya go.