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Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick.

18 Jan 2017 21:24 | Author: purpletiger575 | Category: Latin american revolution essay

Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep was first published in 1968. The novel tells the story of Rick Deckard and his quest to retire six Nexus-6 androids, the most advanced type, in 24 hours. The novel follows Deckard and a secondary character - John R. Isidore - through a futuristic San Francisco wasteland. The earth has been largely destroyed by the nuclear fallout of World War Terminus, most of the survivors of which have left for a new colony on Mars. Androids, who are built to be humans slaves on Mars, often escape back to earth where they must be killed because they are devoid of real life.

The novel did not gain a great deal of critical or commercial success until the book was adapted into a screenplay and shot as the movie Blade Runner , starring Harrison Ford. Dick, unfortunately, would not survive to see much of his work take on a second life in film, but today many of his works, including Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? , are considered classics of the science fiction genre. In 2005, Dick and his novel Electric Sheep were the first science fiction pieces to be anthologized in a Library of America volume.

Comments
  1. author
    silverpanda654 18 Jan 2017 04:20

    The same thing happens to me. It s usually graphic with lots of blood and I m always trying to solve conflict, but it never happens. I bought a book, 10,000 dreams interpreted. It gives you insight as to what the symbols in your dreams mean. I think that having dreams like this means that we both worry too much. http://www.amazon.com/Dreams-Interpreted-Gustavus-Hindman-Miller/dp/1862044082/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/105-1903151-8320451?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1175021062&sr=8-1 Do you watch alot of those violent TV shows or movies?? That could be a factor. I don t watch them and still have the violent dreams. I only watch comedies on TV, like the King of Queens is one of my fave shows. Do you take sleeping aids? Sleeping aids will make your dreams weird and vivid.

  2. author
    goldendog424 18 Jan 2017 06:11

    The novel did not gain a great deal of critical or commercial success until the book was adapted into a screenplay and shot as the movie Blade Runner , starring Harrison Ford. Dick, unfortunately, would not survive to see much of his work take on a second life in film, but today many of his works, including Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? , are considered classics of the science fiction genre. In 2005, Dick and his novel Electric Sheep were the first science fiction pieces to be anthologized in a Library of America volume.

    Finally Dick ties these themes together through a theological exploration of the ability of collective humanity to undergo collective suffering. Mercerism, the pervasive religious movement of the novel, calls all humans to join together in a collective sense of empathy for their messianic figure, Wilbur Mercer. Mercer is on a slow climb toward his death and is being persecuted by The Killers. Only by sharing in Mercer s suffering can humanity find a collective spirit strong enough to survive the bleak decay that surrounds them.

    The thing about Philip K. Dick's view on reality is that it only stays reality so long as you don't blink. In that regard, his novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? is kind of like a three-shell game. Take your eyes off Dick's switching, twisting, and shuffling hands for a second, and you never know what you'll find under the cup: an android posing as a flesh-and-blood human, a movie-star turned galactic deity, or a once bustling city turned gray nuclear wasteland? They're all just as likely as the pea you started off with.

    Although nominated for a Nebula , the novel didn't win any awards upon publication. In fact, the only major accolade it earned was placing fifty-first on the Locus Poll for All-Time Best Science Fiction Novel before 1990 ( Source ). And that honor was handed out in 1998, thirty years after the novel was published and more than a decade after Dick's death.

  3. author
    Антон Чверкун 18 Jan 2017 09:18

    The novel did not gain a great deal of critical or commercial success until the book was adapted into a screenplay and shot as the movie Blade Runner , starring Harrison Ford. Dick, unfortunately, would not survive to see much of his work take on a second life in film, but today many of his works, including Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? , are considered classics of the science fiction genre. In 2005, Dick and his novel Electric Sheep were the first science fiction pieces to be anthologized in a Library of America volume.

    Finally Dick ties these themes together through a theological exploration of the ability of collective humanity to undergo collective suffering. Mercerism, the pervasive religious movement of the novel, calls all humans to join together in a collective sense of empathy for their messianic figure, Wilbur Mercer. Mercer is on a slow climb toward his death and is being persecuted by The Killers. Only by sharing in Mercer s suffering can humanity find a collective spirit strong enough to survive the bleak decay that surrounds them.

    The thing about Philip K. Dick''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s view on reality is that it only stays reality so long as you don''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t blink. In that regard, his novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? is kind of like a three-shell game. Take your eyes off Dick''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s switching, twisting, and shuffling hands for a second, and you never know what you''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''ll find under the cup: an android posing as a flesh-and-blood human, a movie-star turned galactic deity, or a once bustling city turned gray nuclear wasteland? They''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''re all just as likely as the pea you started off with.

    Although nominated for a Nebula , the novel didn''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t win any awards upon publication. In fact, the only major accolade it earned was placing fifty-first on the Locus Poll for All-Time Best Science Fiction Novel before 1990 ( Source ). And that honor was handed out in 1998, thirty years after the novel was published and more than a decade after Dick''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s death.

    In this passage, John Isidore, a mentally challenged young man living by himself, participates in a strange religious event--albeit one that''''''''''''''''s mass-marketed in his society. John grips the sides of the empathy box, a strange, futuristic device that allows millions of people to feel the same sensations as the box''''''''''''''''s controller. In this case, the controller is Wilbur Mercer, a pseudo-religious figure who stands for the most popular religion of the future, Mercerism.

    In this passage, Rick contemplates empathy and its relationship with the ideology of Mercerism (the most popular religion in Dick''''''''''''''''s futuristic society). As Rick sees it, empathy is a survival mechanism and nothing more. The biology is simple: if life forms are "programmed" to feel empathy, then they have an automatic incentive to stick together and take care of each other. Over the millennia, humans have evolved to feel a strong sense of empathy for one another, simply because empathy is good for the species.

    Replicants became illegal on Earth after a bloody off-world mutiny by Nexus 6 replicants, before the events of the film. Two weeks before the starting point of the film, six Nexus 6 replicants escaped the off-world colonies, killing 23 people and taking a shuttle to Earth; the film focuses on the pursuit of the replicants by Deckard, a special police officer called a "blade runner", who investigates, tests, and "retires" (kills) replicants found on Earth.

    Nexus 6 replicants had been designed to copy humans in every way except for their emotions. The Tyrell Corporation "began to recognize in them strange obsession", and in order to be able to control them better, started to implant false memories into the replicants in order to give them the years of experiences that humans take for granted; these memories created "a cushion or pillow for their emotions".

    Blade Runner 2: The Edge of Human (1995) is a science fiction novel by K. W. Jeter , and a continuation of both the film Blade Runner , and the novel upon which it was based, Philip K. Dick 's Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?

    Deckard and Holden's investigations lead them to re-visit Sebastian, Bryant, and John Isidore (from the book Do Androids Dream Of Electric Sheep? ), learning more about the nature of the blade runners and the replicants.

  4. author
    User1489244930 18 Jan 2017 06:50

    Maybe you have a secret ambitionn to be a glamour model or something like that. You lock yourself in your room because you are scared of people finding out about this, because you might think they wouldn t like it. And obviously the taking pictures would be linked to glamour modelling????

  5. author
    User1488421385 17 Jan 2017 21:59

    The empathy box is a cornerstone of the religion of Mercerism, which, in the world of Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, has millions of followers.

  6. author
    User1489244437 17 Jan 2017 23:56

    The novel did not gain a great deal of critical or commercial success until the book was adapted into a screenplay and shot as the movie Blade Runner , starring Harrison Ford. Dick, unfortunately, would not survive to see much of his work take on a second life in film, but today many of his works, including Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? , are considered classics of the science fiction genre. In 2005, Dick and his novel Electric Sheep were the first science fiction pieces to be anthologized in a Library of America volume.

    Finally Dick ties these themes together through a theological exploration of the ability of collective humanity to undergo collective suffering. Mercerism, the pervasive religious movement of the novel, calls all humans to join together in a collective sense of empathy for their messianic figure, Wilbur Mercer. Mercer is on a slow climb toward his death and is being persecuted by The Killers. Only by sharing in Mercer s suffering can humanity find a collective spirit strong enough to survive the bleak decay that surrounds them.

    The thing about Philip K. Dick''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s view on reality is that it only stays reality so long as you don''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t blink. In that regard, his novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? is kind of like a three-shell game. Take your eyes off Dick''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s switching, twisting, and shuffling hands for a second, and you never know what you''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''ll find under the cup: an android posing as a flesh-and-blood human, a movie-star turned galactic deity, or a once bustling city turned gray nuclear wasteland? They''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''re all just as likely as the pea you started off with.

    Although nominated for a Nebula , the novel didn''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t win any awards upon publication. In fact, the only major accolade it earned was placing fifty-first on the Locus Poll for All-Time Best Science Fiction Novel before 1990 ( Source ). And that honor was handed out in 1998, thirty years after the novel was published and more than a decade after Dick''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s death.

    In this passage, John Isidore, a mentally challenged young man living by himself, participates in a strange religious event--albeit one that''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s mass-marketed in his society. John grips the sides of the empathy box, a strange, futuristic device that allows millions of people to feel the same sensations as the box''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s controller. In this case, the controller is Wilbur Mercer, a pseudo-religious figure who stands for the most popular religion of the future, Mercerism.

    In this passage, Rick contemplates empathy and its relationship with the ideology of Mercerism (the most popular religion in Dick''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s futuristic society). As Rick sees it, empathy is a survival mechanism and nothing more. The biology is simple: if life forms are "programmed" to feel empathy, then they have an automatic incentive to stick together and take care of each other. Over the millennia, humans have evolved to feel a strong sense of empathy for one another, simply because empathy is good for the species.

    Replicants became illegal on Earth after a bloody off-world mutiny by Nexus 6 replicants, before the events of the film. Two weeks before the starting point of the film, six Nexus 6 replicants escaped the off-world colonies, killing 23 people and taking a shuttle to Earth; the film focuses on the pursuit of the replicants by Deckard, a special police officer called a "blade runner", who investigates, tests, and "retires" (kills) replicants found on Earth.

    Nexus 6 replicants had been designed to copy humans in every way except for their emotions. The Tyrell Corporation "began to recognize in them strange obsession", and in order to be able to control them better, started to implant false memories into the replicants in order to give them the years of experiences that humans take for granted; these memories created "a cushion or pillow for their emotions".

    Blade Runner 2: The Edge of Human (1995) is a science fiction novel by K. W. Jeter , and a continuation of both the film Blade Runner , and the novel upon which it was based, Philip K. Dick ''s Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?

    Deckard and Holden''s investigations lead them to re-visit Sebastian, Bryant, and John Isidore (from the book Do Androids Dream Of Electric Sheep? ), learning more about the nature of the blade runners and the replicants.

  7. author
    ticklishduck253 17 Jan 2017 22:53

    The novel did not gain a great deal of critical or commercial success until the book was adapted into a screenplay and shot as the movie Blade Runner , starring Harrison Ford. Dick, unfortunately, would not survive to see much of his work take on a second life in film, but today many of his works, including Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? , are considered classics of the science fiction genre. In 2005, Dick and his novel Electric Sheep were the first science fiction pieces to be anthologized in a Library of America volume.

    Finally Dick ties these themes together through a theological exploration of the ability of collective humanity to undergo collective suffering. Mercerism, the pervasive religious movement of the novel, calls all humans to join together in a collective sense of empathy for their messianic figure, Wilbur Mercer. Mercer is on a slow climb toward his death and is being persecuted by The Killers. Only by sharing in Mercer s suffering can humanity find a collective spirit strong enough to survive the bleak decay that surrounds them.

    The thing about Philip K. Dick''s view on reality is that it only stays reality so long as you don''t blink. In that regard, his novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? is kind of like a three-shell game. Take your eyes off Dick''s switching, twisting, and shuffling hands for a second, and you never know what you''ll find under the cup: an android posing as a flesh-and-blood human, a movie-star turned galactic deity, or a once bustling city turned gray nuclear wasteland? They''re all just as likely as the pea you started off with.

    Although nominated for a Nebula , the novel didn''t win any awards upon publication. In fact, the only major accolade it earned was placing fifty-first on the Locus Poll for All-Time Best Science Fiction Novel before 1990 ( Source ). And that honor was handed out in 1998, thirty years after the novel was published and more than a decade after Dick''s death.

  8. author
    greenmeercat981 18 Jan 2017 09:33

    The novel did not gain a great deal of critical or commercial success until the book was adapted into a screenplay and shot as the movie Blade Runner , starring Harrison Ford. Dick, unfortunately, would not survive to see much of his work take on a second life in film, but today many of his works, including Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? , are considered classics of the science fiction genre. In 2005, Dick and his novel Electric Sheep were the first science fiction pieces to be anthologized in a Library of America volume.

    Finally Dick ties these themes together through a theological exploration of the ability of collective humanity to undergo collective suffering. Mercerism, the pervasive religious movement of the novel, calls all humans to join together in a collective sense of empathy for their messianic figure, Wilbur Mercer. Mercer is on a slow climb toward his death and is being persecuted by The Killers. Only by sharing in Mercer s suffering can humanity find a collective spirit strong enough to survive the bleak decay that surrounds them.

    The thing about Philip K. Dick''''s view on reality is that it only stays reality so long as you don''''t blink. In that regard, his novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? is kind of like a three-shell game. Take your eyes off Dick''''s switching, twisting, and shuffling hands for a second, and you never know what you''''ll find under the cup: an android posing as a flesh-and-blood human, a movie-star turned galactic deity, or a once bustling city turned gray nuclear wasteland? They''''re all just as likely as the pea you started off with.

    Although nominated for a Nebula , the novel didn''''t win any awards upon publication. In fact, the only major accolade it earned was placing fifty-first on the Locus Poll for All-Time Best Science Fiction Novel before 1990 ( Source ). And that honor was handed out in 1998, thirty years after the novel was published and more than a decade after Dick''''s death.

    In this passage, John Isidore, a mentally challenged young man living by himself, participates in a strange religious event--albeit one that's mass-marketed in his society. John grips the sides of the empathy box, a strange, futuristic device that allows millions of people to feel the same sensations as the box's controller. In this case, the controller is Wilbur Mercer, a pseudo-religious figure who stands for the most popular religion of the future, Mercerism.

    In this passage, Rick contemplates empathy and its relationship with the ideology of Mercerism (the most popular religion in Dick's futuristic society). As Rick sees it, empathy is a survival mechanism and nothing more. The biology is simple: if life forms are "programmed" to feel empathy, then they have an automatic incentive to stick together and take care of each other. Over the millennia, humans have evolved to feel a strong sense of empathy for one another, simply because empathy is good for the species.

  9. author
    tinybutterfly491 18 Jan 2017 07:44

    In my opinion, this dream might just be a product of your fear of car accidents. I wouldn t say that it is a premonition. Do not worry, we always dream things that bring fear, joy, happiness, etc.; but it does not mean it will happen in real life. Dreams are often times memories (imaginative, or real) that we carry. I know it is far more complex than this, but I wouldn t worry.

  10. author
    heavyrabbit734 18 Jan 2017 08:10

    The novel did not gain a great deal of critical or commercial success until the book was adapted into a screenplay and shot as the movie Blade Runner , starring Harrison Ford. Dick, unfortunately, would not survive to see much of his work take on a second life in film, but today many of his works, including Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? , are considered classics of the science fiction genre. In 2005, Dick and his novel Electric Sheep were the first science fiction pieces to be anthologized in a Library of America volume.

    Finally Dick ties these themes together through a theological exploration of the ability of collective humanity to undergo collective suffering. Mercerism, the pervasive religious movement of the novel, calls all humans to join together in a collective sense of empathy for their messianic figure, Wilbur Mercer. Mercer is on a slow climb toward his death and is being persecuted by The Killers. Only by sharing in Mercer s suffering can humanity find a collective spirit strong enough to survive the bleak decay that surrounds them.

    The thing about Philip K. Dick''''''''s view on reality is that it only stays reality so long as you don''''''''t blink. In that regard, his novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? is kind of like a three-shell game. Take your eyes off Dick''''''''s switching, twisting, and shuffling hands for a second, and you never know what you''''''''ll find under the cup: an android posing as a flesh-and-blood human, a movie-star turned galactic deity, or a once bustling city turned gray nuclear wasteland? They''''''''re all just as likely as the pea you started off with.

    Although nominated for a Nebula , the novel didn''''''''t win any awards upon publication. In fact, the only major accolade it earned was placing fifty-first on the Locus Poll for All-Time Best Science Fiction Novel before 1990 ( Source ). And that honor was handed out in 1998, thirty years after the novel was published and more than a decade after Dick''''''''s death.

    In this passage, John Isidore, a mentally challenged young man living by himself, participates in a strange religious event--albeit one that''s mass-marketed in his society. John grips the sides of the empathy box, a strange, futuristic device that allows millions of people to feel the same sensations as the box''s controller. In this case, the controller is Wilbur Mercer, a pseudo-religious figure who stands for the most popular religion of the future, Mercerism.

    In this passage, Rick contemplates empathy and its relationship with the ideology of Mercerism (the most popular religion in Dick''s futuristic society). As Rick sees it, empathy is a survival mechanism and nothing more. The biology is simple: if life forms are "programmed" to feel empathy, then they have an automatic incentive to stick together and take care of each other. Over the millennia, humans have evolved to feel a strong sense of empathy for one another, simply because empathy is good for the species.

  11. author
    brownduck728 18 Jan 2017 07:25

    The novel did not gain a great deal of critical or commercial success until the book was adapted into a screenplay and shot as the movie Blade Runner , starring Harrison Ford. Dick, unfortunately, would not survive to see much of his work take on a second life in film, but today many of his works, including Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? , are considered classics of the science fiction genre. In 2005, Dick and his novel Electric Sheep were the first science fiction pieces to be anthologized in a Library of America volume.

    Finally Dick ties these themes together through a theological exploration of the ability of collective humanity to undergo collective suffering. Mercerism, the pervasive religious movement of the novel, calls all humans to join together in a collective sense of empathy for their messianic figure, Wilbur Mercer. Mercer is on a slow climb toward his death and is being persecuted by The Killers. Only by sharing in Mercer s suffering can humanity find a collective spirit strong enough to survive the bleak decay that surrounds them.

    The thing about Philip K. Dick''''''''''''''''s view on reality is that it only stays reality so long as you don''''''''''''''''t blink. In that regard, his novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? is kind of like a three-shell game. Take your eyes off Dick''''''''''''''''s switching, twisting, and shuffling hands for a second, and you never know what you''''''''''''''''ll find under the cup: an android posing as a flesh-and-blood human, a movie-star turned galactic deity, or a once bustling city turned gray nuclear wasteland? They''''''''''''''''re all just as likely as the pea you started off with.

    Although nominated for a Nebula , the novel didn''''''''''''''''t win any awards upon publication. In fact, the only major accolade it earned was placing fifty-first on the Locus Poll for All-Time Best Science Fiction Novel before 1990 ( Source ). And that honor was handed out in 1998, thirty years after the novel was published and more than a decade after Dick''''''''''''''''s death.

    In this passage, John Isidore, a mentally challenged young man living by himself, participates in a strange religious event--albeit one that''''s mass-marketed in his society. John grips the sides of the empathy box, a strange, futuristic device that allows millions of people to feel the same sensations as the box''''s controller. In this case, the controller is Wilbur Mercer, a pseudo-religious figure who stands for the most popular religion of the future, Mercerism.

    In this passage, Rick contemplates empathy and its relationship with the ideology of Mercerism (the most popular religion in Dick''''s futuristic society). As Rick sees it, empathy is a survival mechanism and nothing more. The biology is simple: if life forms are "programmed" to feel empathy, then they have an automatic incentive to stick together and take care of each other. Over the millennia, humans have evolved to feel a strong sense of empathy for one another, simply because empathy is good for the species.

    Replicants became illegal on Earth after a bloody off-world mutiny by Nexus 6 replicants, before the events of the film. Two weeks before the starting point of the film, six Nexus 6 replicants escaped the off-world colonies, killing 23 people and taking a shuttle to Earth; the film focuses on the pursuit of the replicants by Deckard, a special police officer called a "blade runner", who investigates, tests, and "retires" (kills) replicants found on Earth.

    Nexus 6 replicants had been designed to copy humans in every way except for their emotions. The Tyrell Corporation "began to recognize in them strange obsession", and in order to be able to control them better, started to implant false memories into the replicants in order to give them the years of experiences that humans take for granted; these memories created "a cushion or pillow for their emotions".

  12. author
    heavypanda807 18 Jan 2017 05:48

    The novel did not gain a great deal of critical or commercial success until the book was adapted into a screenplay and shot as the movie Blade Runner , starring Harrison Ford. Dick, unfortunately, would not survive to see much of his work take on a second life in film, but today many of his works, including Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? , are considered classics of the science fiction genre. In 2005, Dick and his novel Electric Sheep were the first science fiction pieces to be anthologized in a Library of America volume.

    Finally Dick ties these themes together through a theological exploration of the ability of collective humanity to undergo collective suffering. Mercerism, the pervasive religious movement of the novel, calls all humans to join together in a collective sense of empathy for their messianic figure, Wilbur Mercer. Mercer is on a slow climb toward his death and is being persecuted by The Killers. Only by sharing in Mercer s suffering can humanity find a collective spirit strong enough to survive the bleak decay that surrounds them.

    The thing about Philip K. Dick''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s view on reality is that it only stays reality so long as you don''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t blink. In that regard, his novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? is kind of like a three-shell game. Take your eyes off Dick''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s switching, twisting, and shuffling hands for a second, and you never know what you''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''ll find under the cup: an android posing as a flesh-and-blood human, a movie-star turned galactic deity, or a once bustling city turned gray nuclear wasteland? They''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''re all just as likely as the pea you started off with.

    Although nominated for a Nebula , the novel didn''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t win any awards upon publication. In fact, the only major accolade it earned was placing fifty-first on the Locus Poll for All-Time Best Science Fiction Novel before 1990 ( Source ). And that honor was handed out in 1998, thirty years after the novel was published and more than a decade after Dick''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s death.

    In this passage, John Isidore, a mentally challenged young man living by himself, participates in a strange religious event--albeit one that''''''''s mass-marketed in his society. John grips the sides of the empathy box, a strange, futuristic device that allows millions of people to feel the same sensations as the box''''''''s controller. In this case, the controller is Wilbur Mercer, a pseudo-religious figure who stands for the most popular religion of the future, Mercerism.

    In this passage, Rick contemplates empathy and its relationship with the ideology of Mercerism (the most popular religion in Dick''''''''s futuristic society). As Rick sees it, empathy is a survival mechanism and nothing more. The biology is simple: if life forms are "programmed" to feel empathy, then they have an automatic incentive to stick together and take care of each other. Over the millennia, humans have evolved to feel a strong sense of empathy for one another, simply because empathy is good for the species.

    Replicants became illegal on Earth after a bloody off-world mutiny by Nexus 6 replicants, before the events of the film. Two weeks before the starting point of the film, six Nexus 6 replicants escaped the off-world colonies, killing 23 people and taking a shuttle to Earth; the film focuses on the pursuit of the replicants by Deckard, a special police officer called a "blade runner", who investigates, tests, and "retires" (kills) replicants found on Earth.

    Nexus 6 replicants had been designed to copy humans in every way except for their emotions. The Tyrell Corporation "began to recognize in them strange obsession", and in order to be able to control them better, started to implant false memories into the replicants in order to give them the years of experiences that humans take for granted; these memories created "a cushion or pillow for their emotions".