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Color Symbolism in The Great Gatsby?

18 Jan 2017 21:24 | Author: heavypanda536 | Category: Essay topics on moral justice

Color may generate another level of meaning in the mind. This symbolism arises from cultural and contemporary contexts. As such, it is not universal and may be.

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  1. author
    H y p o d e r м ι c 18 Jan 2017 00:59

    The green light isn''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t the only symbolic color in Great Gatsby. Fitzgerald uses color like a preschooler let loose with tempera paints —only a little more meaningfully. Let''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s break it down:

    First off, we''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''ve got yellows and golds, which we''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''re thinking has something to do with…gold (in the cash money sense). Why gold and not green? Because we''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''re talking about the real stuff, the authentic, traditional, "old money" – not these new-fangled dollar bills. So you have Gatsby''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s party, where the turkeys are "bewitched to dark gold," and Jordan''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s "slender golden arm[s]" (3.19), and Daisy the "golden girl" (7.99), and Gatsby wearing a gold tie to see Daisy at Nick''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s house.

    Almost every chapter of Fitzgerald’s novel uses colors in their purest shades to make readers get an insight into the different characters’ lives. Naturally, to fully fathom these colors mentioned, readers must also first understand the situations within which they are used.

    Perhaps the greatest and most important representation of Green color in The Great Gatsby is the green light mentioned at the end of the novel which is used to depict that Gatsby remains a dreamer throughout. This color thus represents an orgiastic future or romantic reunion which Gatsby continues to believes in. Sentences such as ‘tomorrow we will run faster and stretch our arms wider’ also reinforce this belief.

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    F. Scott Fitzgerald''''s 1925 novel The Great Gatsby tells the story of mysterious Jay Gatsby''''s obsession with the wealthy Daisy Buchanan. After being rejected by Daisy years before because he had no money, Gatsby has now amassed great wealth and throws lavish parties on his Long Island estate hoping to win the attention of the now-married Daisy, who lives across the bay.

    Narrated by Gatsby''''s neighbor Nick Carraway, the book chronicles a summer in which Gatsby finally wins Daisy''''s affections, only to be discovered by Daisy''''s husband Tom. The book ends in an explosion of violence as, after the affair is exposed by Tom, Daisy accidentally kills Tom''''s mistress Myrtle by running her over with Gatsby''''s car. Myrtle''''s husband, thinking Gatsby responsible, then kills Gatsby.

    On the surface, The Great Gatsby is a story of the thwarted love between a man and a woman. The main theme of the novel, however, encompasses a much larger, less romantic scope. Though all of its action takes place over a mere few months during the summer of 1922 and is set in a circumscribed geographical area in the vicinity of Long Island, New York, The Great Gatsby is a highly symbolic meditation on 1920s America as a whole, in particular the disintegration of the American dream in an era of unprecedented prosperity and material excess.

    Situated at the end of Daisy’s East Egg dock and barely visible from Gatsby’s West Egg lawn, the green light represents Gatsby’s hopes and dreams for the future. Gatsby associates it with Daisy, and in Chapter 1 he reaches toward it in the darkness as a guiding light to lead him to his goal. Because Gatsby’s quest for Daisy is broadly associated with the American dream, the green light also symbolizes that more generalized ideal. In Chapter 9, Nick compares the green light to how America, rising out of the ocean, must have looked to early settlers of the new nation.

  2. author
    Делирияфан 18 Jan 2017 03:28

    The green light isn''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t the only symbolic color in Great Gatsby. Fitzgerald uses color like a preschooler let loose with tempera paints —only a little more meaningfully. Let''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s break it down:

    First off, we''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''ve got yellows and golds, which we''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''re thinking has something to do with…gold (in the cash money sense). Why gold and not green? Because we''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''re talking about the real stuff, the authentic, traditional, "old money" – not these new-fangled dollar bills. So you have Gatsby''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s party, where the turkeys are "bewitched to dark gold," and Jordan''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s "slender golden arm[s]" (3.19), and Daisy the "golden girl" (7.99), and Gatsby wearing a gold tie to see Daisy at Nick''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s house.

    Almost every chapter of Fitzgerald’s novel uses colors in their purest shades to make readers get an insight into the different characters’ lives. Naturally, to fully fathom these colors mentioned, readers must also first understand the situations within which they are used.

    Perhaps the greatest and most important representation of Green color in The Great Gatsby is the green light mentioned at the end of the novel which is used to depict that Gatsby remains a dreamer throughout. This color thus represents an orgiastic future or romantic reunion which Gatsby continues to believes in. Sentences such as ‘tomorrow we will run faster and stretch our arms wider’ also reinforce this belief.

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  3. author
    User1489531811 17 Jan 2017 22:50

    The green light isn''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t the only symbolic color in Great Gatsby. Fitzgerald uses color like a preschooler let loose with tempera paints —only a little more meaningfully. Let''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s break it down:

    First off, we''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''ve got yellows and golds, which we''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''re thinking has something to do with…gold (in the cash money sense). Why gold and not green? Because we''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''re talking about the real stuff, the authentic, traditional, "old money" – not these new-fangled dollar bills. So you have Gatsby''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s party, where the turkeys are "bewitched to dark gold," and Jordan''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s "slender golden arm[s]" (3.19), and Daisy the "golden girl" (7.99), and Gatsby wearing a gold tie to see Daisy at Nick''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s house.

    Almost every chapter of Fitzgerald’s novel uses colors in their purest shades to make readers get an insight into the different characters’ lives. Naturally, to fully fathom these colors mentioned, readers must also first understand the situations within which they are used.

    Perhaps the greatest and most important representation of Green color in The Great Gatsby is the green light mentioned at the end of the novel which is used to depict that Gatsby remains a dreamer throughout. This color thus represents an orgiastic future or romantic reunion which Gatsby continues to believes in. Sentences such as ‘tomorrow we will run faster and stretch our arms wider’ also reinforce this belief.

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  4. author
    blackcat317 18 Jan 2017 08:47

    Click here color symbolism in the great gatsby

    Color may generate another level of meaning in the mind. This symbolism arises from cultural and contemporary contexts. As such, it is not universal and may be.

  5. author
    User1488642055 18 Jan 2017 02:14

    The green light isn't the only symbolic color in Great Gatsby. Fitzgerald uses color like a preschooler let loose with tempera paints —only a little more meaningfully. Let's break it down:

    First off, we've got yellows and golds, which we're thinking has something to do with…gold (in the cash money sense). Why gold and not green? Because we're talking about the real stuff, the authentic, traditional, "old money" – not these new-fangled dollar bills. So you have Gatsby's party, where the turkeys are "bewitched to dark gold," and Jordan's "slender golden arm[s]" (3.19), and Daisy the "golden girl" (7.99), and Gatsby wearing a gold tie to see Daisy at Nick's house.

  6. author
    User1491228945 18 Jan 2017 07:35

    The green light isn''''''''t the only symbolic color in Great Gatsby. Fitzgerald uses color like a preschooler let loose with tempera paints —only a little more meaningfully. Let''''''''s break it down:

    First off, we''''''''ve got yellows and golds, which we''''''''re thinking has something to do with…gold (in the cash money sense). Why gold and not green? Because we''''''''re talking about the real stuff, the authentic, traditional, "old money" – not these new-fangled dollar bills. So you have Gatsby''''''''s party, where the turkeys are "bewitched to dark gold," and Jordan''''''''s "slender golden arm[s]" (3.19), and Daisy the "golden girl" (7.99), and Gatsby wearing a gold tie to see Daisy at Nick''''''''s house.

    Almost every chapter of Fitzgerald’s novel uses colors in their purest shades to make readers get an insight into the different characters’ lives. Naturally, to fully fathom these colors mentioned, readers must also first understand the situations within which they are used.

    Perhaps the greatest and most important representation of Green color in The Great Gatsby is the green light mentioned at the end of the novel which is used to depict that Gatsby remains a dreamer throughout. This color thus represents an orgiastic future or romantic reunion which Gatsby continues to believes in. Sentences such as ‘tomorrow we will run faster and stretch our arms wider’ also reinforce this belief.

  7. author
    User1491511924 18 Jan 2017 04:34

    The green light isn''''t the only symbolic color in Great Gatsby. Fitzgerald uses color like a preschooler let loose with tempera paints —only a little more meaningfully. Let''''s break it down:

    First off, we''''ve got yellows and golds, which we''''re thinking has something to do with…gold (in the cash money sense). Why gold and not green? Because we''''re talking about the real stuff, the authentic, traditional, "old money" – not these new-fangled dollar bills. So you have Gatsby''''s party, where the turkeys are "bewitched to dark gold," and Jordan''''s "slender golden arm[s]" (3.19), and Daisy the "golden girl" (7.99), and Gatsby wearing a gold tie to see Daisy at Nick''''s house.

    Almost every chapter of Fitzgerald’s novel uses colors in their purest shades to make readers get an insight into the different characters’ lives. Naturally, to fully fathom these colors mentioned, readers must also first understand the situations within which they are used.

    Perhaps the greatest and most important representation of Green color in The Great Gatsby is the green light mentioned at the end of the novel which is used to depict that Gatsby remains a dreamer throughout. This color thus represents an orgiastic future or romantic reunion which Gatsby continues to believes in. Sentences such as ‘tomorrow we will run faster and stretch our arms wider’ also reinforce this belief.

  8. author
    User1489474241 18 Jan 2017 09:38

    I always thought it was weird that Gatsby desired to not be poor (wanted money) and the light on Daisy s dock was green (also the color of money) and he desired her as well. Does that help?

  9. author
    purplepeacock290 18 Jan 2017 04:23

    The green light isn''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t the only symbolic color in Great Gatsby. Fitzgerald uses color like a preschooler let loose with tempera paints —only a little more meaningfully. Let''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s break it down:

    First off, we''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''ve got yellows and golds, which we''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''re thinking has something to do with…gold (in the cash money sense). Why gold and not green? Because we''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''re talking about the real stuff, the authentic, traditional, "old money" – not these new-fangled dollar bills. So you have Gatsby''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s party, where the turkeys are "bewitched to dark gold," and Jordan''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s "slender golden arm[s]" (3.19), and Daisy the "golden girl" (7.99), and Gatsby wearing a gold tie to see Daisy at Nick''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s house.

    Almost every chapter of Fitzgerald’s novel uses colors in their purest shades to make readers get an insight into the different characters’ lives. Naturally, to fully fathom these colors mentioned, readers must also first understand the situations within which they are used.

    Perhaps the greatest and most important representation of Green color in The Great Gatsby is the green light mentioned at the end of the novel which is used to depict that Gatsby remains a dreamer throughout. This color thus represents an orgiastic future or romantic reunion which Gatsby continues to believes in. Sentences such as ‘tomorrow we will run faster and stretch our arms wider’ also reinforce this belief.

    Oops. A firewall is blocking access to Prezi content. Check out this article to learn more or contact your system administrator.

    Oops. A firewall is blocking access to Prezi content. Check out this article to learn more or contact your system administrator.

    F. Scott Fitzgerald''s 1925 novel The Great Gatsby tells the story of mysterious Jay Gatsby''s obsession with the wealthy Daisy Buchanan. After being rejected by Daisy years before because he had no money, Gatsby has now amassed great wealth and throws lavish parties on his Long Island estate hoping to win the attention of the now-married Daisy, who lives across the bay.

    Narrated by Gatsby''s neighbor Nick Carraway, the book chronicles a summer in which Gatsby finally wins Daisy''s affections, only to be discovered by Daisy''s husband Tom. The book ends in an explosion of violence as, after the affair is exposed by Tom, Daisy accidentally kills Tom''s mistress Myrtle by running her over with Gatsby''s car. Myrtle''s husband, thinking Gatsby responsible, then kills Gatsby.

    On the surface, The Great Gatsby is a story of the thwarted love between a man and a woman. The main theme of the novel, however, encompasses a much larger, less romantic scope. Though all of its action takes place over a mere few months during the summer of 1922 and is set in a circumscribed geographical area in the vicinity of Long Island, New York, The Great Gatsby is a highly symbolic meditation on 1920s America as a whole, in particular the disintegration of the American dream in an era of unprecedented prosperity and material excess.

    Situated at the end of Daisy’s East Egg dock and barely visible from Gatsby’s West Egg lawn, the green light represents Gatsby’s hopes and dreams for the future. Gatsby associates it with Daisy, and in Chapter 1 he reaches toward it in the darkness as a guiding light to lead him to his goal. Because Gatsby’s quest for Daisy is broadly associated with the American dream, the green light also symbolizes that more generalized ideal. In Chapter 9, Nick compares the green light to how America, rising out of the ocean, must have looked to early settlers of the new nation.

  10. author
    User1489456197 18 Jan 2017 02:41

    With good reason you re having trouble. Tom is not associated with a specific color of set of colors. Instead he is connected to arrogance and force. He has a "swagger" in his riding outfit. The closest color that comes to mind is pearl, not the white of Daisy but the richer, more expensive sheen of off white (non-purity?). Tom buys Daisy an expensive pearl necklace (that she throws away) as a wedding gift, and when Nick last sees him he is buying jewelry--perhaps another pearl necklace. "Then he went into the jewelry store to buy a pearl necklace—or perhaps only a pair of cuff buttons." Nick as the narrator is consequently transparent throughout much of the story. There are no colors associated with him because he is not meant to compete with Gatsby (white suits, gaudy yellow car with green seats) or Daisy (wears white, has a green light at her dock). When Daisy compares him to a rose at dinner in chapter one, he denies that he is like a rose (of any color).

  11. author
    smallelephant384 18 Jan 2017 01:03

    probably white because Daisy dressed in white and she had a white car. White represents purity, virginity, innocence.things like that.

  12. author
    brownkoala379 17 Jan 2017 23:22

    The green light isn''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t the only symbolic color in Great Gatsby. Fitzgerald uses color like a preschooler let loose with tempera paints —only a little more meaningfully. Let''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s break it down:

    First off, we''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''ve got yellows and golds, which we''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''re thinking has something to do with…gold (in the cash money sense). Why gold and not green? Because we''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''re talking about the real stuff, the authentic, traditional, "old money" – not these new-fangled dollar bills. So you have Gatsby''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s party, where the turkeys are "bewitched to dark gold," and Jordan''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s "slender golden arm[s]" (3.19), and Daisy the "golden girl" (7.99), and Gatsby wearing a gold tie to see Daisy at Nick''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s house.

    Almost every chapter of Fitzgerald’s novel uses colors in their purest shades to make readers get an insight into the different characters’ lives. Naturally, to fully fathom these colors mentioned, readers must also first understand the situations within which they are used.

    Perhaps the greatest and most important representation of Green color in The Great Gatsby is the green light mentioned at the end of the novel which is used to depict that Gatsby remains a dreamer throughout. This color thus represents an orgiastic future or romantic reunion which Gatsby continues to believes in. Sentences such as ‘tomorrow we will run faster and stretch our arms wider’ also reinforce this belief.

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    F. Scott Fitzgerald's 1925 novel The Great Gatsby tells the story of mysterious Jay Gatsby's obsession with the wealthy Daisy Buchanan. After being rejected by Daisy years before because he had no money, Gatsby has now amassed great wealth and throws lavish parties on his Long Island estate hoping to win the attention of the now-married Daisy, who lives across the bay.

    Narrated by Gatsby's neighbor Nick Carraway, the book chronicles a summer in which Gatsby finally wins Daisy's affections, only to be discovered by Daisy's husband Tom. The book ends in an explosion of violence as, after the affair is exposed by Tom, Daisy accidentally kills Tom's mistress Myrtle by running her over with Gatsby's car. Myrtle's husband, thinking Gatsby responsible, then kills Gatsby.

  13. author
    User1487884388 18 Jan 2017 02:29

    F. Scott Fitzgerald uses a lot of colors in "The Great Gatsby" to underline his. Sometimes Gatsby comes up with the color pink. "the luminosity of his pink suit.

  14. author
    crazybird659 18 Jan 2017 02:35

    The green light isn''t the only symbolic color in Great Gatsby. Fitzgerald uses color like a preschooler let loose with tempera paints —only a little more meaningfully. Let''s break it down:

    First off, we''ve got yellows and golds, which we''re thinking has something to do with…gold (in the cash money sense). Why gold and not green? Because we''re talking about the real stuff, the authentic, traditional, "old money" – not these new-fangled dollar bills. So you have Gatsby''s party, where the turkeys are "bewitched to dark gold," and Jordan''s "slender golden arm[s]" (3.19), and Daisy the "golden girl" (7.99), and Gatsby wearing a gold tie to see Daisy at Nick''s house.

    Almost every chapter of Fitzgerald’s novel uses colors in their purest shades to make readers get an insight into the different characters’ lives. Naturally, to fully fathom these colors mentioned, readers must also first understand the situations within which they are used.

    Perhaps the greatest and most important representation of Green color in The Great Gatsby is the green light mentioned at the end of the novel which is used to depict that Gatsby remains a dreamer throughout. This color thus represents an orgiastic future or romantic reunion which Gatsby continues to believes in. Sentences such as ‘tomorrow we will run faster and stretch our arms wider’ also reinforce this belief.

  15. author
    beautifulduck250 18 Jan 2017 07:49

    The green light isn''''''''''''''''t the only symbolic color in Great Gatsby. Fitzgerald uses color like a preschooler let loose with tempera paints —only a little more meaningfully. Let''''''''''''''''s break it down:

    First off, we''''''''''''''''ve got yellows and golds, which we''''''''''''''''re thinking has something to do with…gold (in the cash money sense). Why gold and not green? Because we''''''''''''''''re talking about the real stuff, the authentic, traditional, "old money" – not these new-fangled dollar bills. So you have Gatsby''''''''''''''''s party, where the turkeys are "bewitched to dark gold," and Jordan''''''''''''''''s "slender golden arm[s]" (3.19), and Daisy the "golden girl" (7.99), and Gatsby wearing a gold tie to see Daisy at Nick''''''''''''''''s house.

    Almost every chapter of Fitzgerald’s novel uses colors in their purest shades to make readers get an insight into the different characters’ lives. Naturally, to fully fathom these colors mentioned, readers must also first understand the situations within which they are used.

    Perhaps the greatest and most important representation of Green color in The Great Gatsby is the green light mentioned at the end of the novel which is used to depict that Gatsby remains a dreamer throughout. This color thus represents an orgiastic future or romantic reunion which Gatsby continues to believes in. Sentences such as ‘tomorrow we will run faster and stretch our arms wider’ also reinforce this belief.

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