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Comments on: Should College Athletes Be Paid?

18 Jan 2017 21:24 | Author: smallostrich318 | Category: Cover letter for a recreation programmer

Collegiate sports are big money makers, at least that’s what most people think, right? The truth is, the only collegiate sports that really make anything for the colleges are football and basketball, and only the top championship teams really bring in money for their schools. Because the general public sees these teams as cash cows, the debate as to if college athletes should be paid is brought up during every championship season, whether it is the football national championship or March Madness, which occurs each year to determine the champion of college basketball.

There are a number of reasons why people believe college athletes should be paid . For instance, serious college athletes spend more time practicing their sports and playing the game as most people spend at work each week. In other words, being a college athlete is the equivalent of a full time job. Speaking of jobs, since college athletes are spending so much time on the field or court and in the classroom, they don’t have the time to actually work, so many of them have a difficult time making ends meet.

Comments
  1. author
    Валерий Ковалев 18 Jan 2017 08:42

    No, since more than likely their getting their tuition paid and possibly some fees and room/board.

  2. author
    beautifulmeercat119 18 Jan 2017 04:26

    There has been major discussion recently if college athletes should or shouldn''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t be paid while they are in school. The first thing opponents say is, "They''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''re already getting a scholarship! That''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s more than anybody else! Don''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t be greedy!"

    Fine, let''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s not be greedy and look at how much a scholarship is actually worth. On average, a full Division 1 scholarship is $25,000 per year.

    Collegiate sports are big money makers, at least that’s what most people think, right? The truth is, the only collegiate sports that really make anything for the colleges are football and basketball, and only the top championship teams really bring in money for their schools. Because the general public sees these teams as cash cows, the debate as to if college athletes should be paid is brought up during every championship season, whether it is the football national championship or March Madness, which occurs each year to determine the champion of college basketball.

    There are a number of reasons why people believe college athletes should be paid. For instance, serious college athletes spend more time practicing their sports and playing the game as most people spend at work each week. In other words, being a college athlete is the equivalent of a full time job. Speaking of jobs, since college athletes are spending so much time on the field or court and in the classroom, they don’t have the time to actually work, so many of them have a difficult time making ends meet.

    Remember in the 2012 campaign for the presidency when Barack Obama’s speech on economic development became a meme with the quote, “If you’ve got a business – you didn’t build that”?

    “You didn’t build that” was Obama’s attempt to state that a successful businesses relies on both equal parts of individual initiative and public infrastructure, with Republican Mitt Romney correctly capitalizing on this socialist quip and going on the attack against the idea that big government is somehow the ally of small-business owners and entrepreneurs.

    News · 3:35 pm EDT April 12, 2017 · Brianna Stone, University of Texas at Austin

    VOICES FROM CAMPUS · 2:00 pm EDT April 12, 2017 · Alexandra Villarreal, Columbia University

    College athletes spend just as much, or more, of their time at practice, games, and traveling as they do in class and studying.

    Football and basketball programs at major colleges bring in millions of dollars and coaches and athletic directors rake in healthy paychecks.

  3. author
    blueleopard261 18 Jan 2017 08:59

    There has been major discussion recently if college athletes should or shouldn''''t be paid while they are in school. The first thing opponents say is, "They''''re already getting a scholarship! That''''s more than anybody else! Don''''t be greedy!"

    Fine, let''''s not be greedy and look at how much a scholarship is actually worth. On average, a full Division 1 scholarship is $25,000 per year.

    Collegiate sports are big money makers, at least that’s what most people think, right? The truth is, the only collegiate sports that really make anything for the colleges are football and basketball, and only the top championship teams really bring in money for their schools. Because the general public sees these teams as cash cows, the debate as to if college athletes should be paid is brought up during every championship season, whether it is the football national championship or March Madness, which occurs each year to determine the champion of college basketball.

    There are a number of reasons why people believe college athletes should be paid. For instance, serious college athletes spend more time practicing their sports and playing the game as most people spend at work each week. In other words, being a college athlete is the equivalent of a full time job. Speaking of jobs, since college athletes are spending so much time on the field or court and in the classroom, they don’t have the time to actually work, so many of them have a difficult time making ends meet.

    Remember in the 2012 campaign for the presidency when Barack Obama’s speech on economic development became a meme with the quote, “If you’ve got a business – you didn’t build that”?

    “You didn’t build that” was Obama’s attempt to state that a successful businesses relies on both equal parts of individual initiative and public infrastructure, with Republican Mitt Romney correctly capitalizing on this socialist quip and going on the attack against the idea that big government is somehow the ally of small-business owners and entrepreneurs.

  4. author
    User1487914491 17 Jan 2017 23:28

    There has been major discussion recently if college athletes should or shouldn''''''''t be paid while they are in school. The first thing opponents say is, "They''''''''re already getting a scholarship! That''''''''s more than anybody else! Don''''''''t be greedy!"

    Fine, let''''''''s not be greedy and look at how much a scholarship is actually worth. On average, a full Division 1 scholarship is $25,000 per year.

    Collegiate sports are big money makers, at least that’s what most people think, right? The truth is, the only collegiate sports that really make anything for the colleges are football and basketball, and only the top championship teams really bring in money for their schools. Because the general public sees these teams as cash cows, the debate as to if college athletes should be paid is brought up during every championship season, whether it is the football national championship or March Madness, which occurs each year to determine the champion of college basketball.

    There are a number of reasons why people believe college athletes should be paid. For instance, serious college athletes spend more time practicing their sports and playing the game as most people spend at work each week. In other words, being a college athlete is the equivalent of a full time job. Speaking of jobs, since college athletes are spending so much time on the field or court and in the classroom, they don’t have the time to actually work, so many of them have a difficult time making ends meet.

    Remember in the 2012 campaign for the presidency when Barack Obama’s speech on economic development became a meme with the quote, “If you’ve got a business – you didn’t build that”?

    “You didn’t build that” was Obama’s attempt to state that a successful businesses relies on both equal parts of individual initiative and public infrastructure, with Republican Mitt Romney correctly capitalizing on this socialist quip and going on the attack against the idea that big government is somehow the ally of small-business owners and entrepreneurs.

    News · 3:35 pm EDT April 12, 2017 · Brianna Stone, University of Texas at Austin

    VOICES FROM CAMPUS · 2:00 pm EDT April 12, 2017 · Alexandra Villarreal, Columbia University

  5. author
    User1489455109 18 Jan 2017 06:03

    There has been major discussion recently if college athletes should or shouldn''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t be paid while they are in school. The first thing opponents say is, "They''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''re already getting a scholarship! That''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s more than anybody else! Don''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t be greedy!"

    Fine, let''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s not be greedy and look at how much a scholarship is actually worth. On average, a full Division 1 scholarship is $25,000 per year.

    Collegiate sports are big money makers, at least that’s what most people think, right? The truth is, the only collegiate sports that really make anything for the colleges are football and basketball, and only the top championship teams really bring in money for their schools. Because the general public sees these teams as cash cows, the debate as to if college athletes should be paid is brought up during every championship season, whether it is the football national championship or March Madness, which occurs each year to determine the champion of college basketball.

    There are a number of reasons why people believe college athletes should be paid. For instance, serious college athletes spend more time practicing their sports and playing the game as most people spend at work each week. In other words, being a college athlete is the equivalent of a full time job. Speaking of jobs, since college athletes are spending so much time on the field or court and in the classroom, they don’t have the time to actually work, so many of them have a difficult time making ends meet.

    Remember in the 2012 campaign for the presidency when Barack Obama’s speech on economic development became a meme with the quote, “If you’ve got a business – you didn’t build that”?

    “You didn’t build that” was Obama’s attempt to state that a successful businesses relies on both equal parts of individual initiative and public infrastructure, with Republican Mitt Romney correctly capitalizing on this socialist quip and going on the attack against the idea that big government is somehow the ally of small-business owners and entrepreneurs.

    News · 3:35 pm EDT April 12, 2017 · Brianna Stone, University of Texas at Austin

    VOICES FROM CAMPUS · 2:00 pm EDT April 12, 2017 · Alexandra Villarreal, Columbia University

    College athletes spend just as much, or more, of their time at practice, games, and traveling as they do in class and studying.

    Football and basketball programs at major colleges bring in millions of dollars and coaches and athletic directors rake in healthy paychecks.

  6. author
    Ольга Буткеева 18 Jan 2017 04:53

    No - colleges are academic institutions, not sports leagues. It would be preferable if the various major sports leagues created effective minor league systems that could develop professional athletes rather than having them go through the formality of "attending" college just for the exposure it provides, when they re not really there for an education anyway.

  7. author
    User1491290025 18 Jan 2017 01:53

    There has been major discussion recently if college athletes should or shouldn''''''''''''''''t be paid while they are in school. The first thing opponents say is, "They''''''''''''''''re already getting a scholarship! That''''''''''''''''s more than anybody else! Don''''''''''''''''t be greedy!"

    Fine, let''''''''''''''''s not be greedy and look at how much a scholarship is actually worth. On average, a full Division 1 scholarship is $25,000 per year.

    Collegiate sports are big money makers, at least that’s what most people think, right? The truth is, the only collegiate sports that really make anything for the colleges are football and basketball, and only the top championship teams really bring in money for their schools. Because the general public sees these teams as cash cows, the debate as to if college athletes should be paid is brought up during every championship season, whether it is the football national championship or March Madness, which occurs each year to determine the champion of college basketball.

    There are a number of reasons why people believe college athletes should be paid. For instance, serious college athletes spend more time practicing their sports and playing the game as most people spend at work each week. In other words, being a college athlete is the equivalent of a full time job. Speaking of jobs, since college athletes are spending so much time on the field or court and in the classroom, they don’t have the time to actually work, so many of them have a difficult time making ends meet.

    Remember in the 2012 campaign for the presidency when Barack Obama’s speech on economic development became a meme with the quote, “If you’ve got a business – you didn’t build that”?

    “You didn’t build that” was Obama’s attempt to state that a successful businesses relies on both equal parts of individual initiative and public infrastructure, with Republican Mitt Romney correctly capitalizing on this socialist quip and going on the attack against the idea that big government is somehow the ally of small-business owners and entrepreneurs.

    News · 3:35 pm EDT April 12, 2017 · Brianna Stone, University of Texas at Austin

    VOICES FROM CAMPUS · 2:00 pm EDT April 12, 2017 · Alexandra Villarreal, Columbia University

  8. author
    purplepeacock764 18 Jan 2017 05:56

    Why N.C.A.A. Athletes Shouldn’t Be Paid. By.. to pay college athletes is a grave mistake—not because it. for The New Yorker that requires.