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Why major college athletes should be paid?

18 Jan 2017 21:24 | Author: tinykoala388 | Category: Why animals should have rights essay

“You didn’t build that” was Obama’s attempt to state that a successful businesses relies on both equal parts of individual initiative and public infrastructure, with Republican Mitt Romney correctly capitalizing on this socialist quip and going on the attack against the idea that big government is somehow the ally of small-business owners and entrepreneurs.

But the phrase “you didn’t built that” is one that needs to enter into the debate about paying college athletes, particularly after Time magazine published a cover story stating: “It’s Time to Pay College Athletes: College sports are mass entertainment. It’s time to fully reward players for their work.”

Comments
  1. author
    M∂ш! 17 Jan 2017 23:46

    Remember in the 2012 campaign for the presidency when Barack Obama’s speech on economic development became a meme with the quote, “If you’ve got a business – you didn’t build that”?

    “You didn’t build that” was Obama’s attempt to state that a successful businesses relies on both equal parts of individual initiative and public infrastructure, with Republican Mitt Romney correctly capitalizing on this socialist quip and going on the attack against the idea that big government is somehow the ally of small-business owners and entrepreneurs.

    There has been major discussion recently if college athletes should or shouldn''''''''t be paid while they are in school. The first thing opponents say is, "They''''''''re already getting a scholarship! That''''''''s more than anybody else! Don''''''''t be greedy!"

    Fine, let''''''''s not be greedy and look at how much a scholarship is actually worth. On average, a full Division 1 scholarship is $25,000 per year.

    Collegiate sports are big money makers, at least that’s what most people think, right? The truth is, the only collegiate sports that really make anything for the colleges are football and basketball, and only the top championship teams really bring in money for their schools. Because the general public sees these teams as cash cows, the debate as to if college athletes should be paid is brought up during every championship season, whether it is the football national championship or March Madness, which occurs each year to determine the champion of college basketball.

    There are a number of reasons why people believe college athletes should be paid. For instance, serious college athletes spend more time practicing their sports and playing the game as most people spend at work each week. In other words, being a college athlete is the equivalent of a full time job. Speaking of jobs, since college athletes are spending so much time on the field or court and in the classroom, they don’t have the time to actually work, so many of them have a difficult time making ends meet.

    What has continued to be one of the most pressing issues in the world of sports today has now become a matter the NCAA can no longer afford to ignore. The service that college athletes provide to the institutions they attend in addition to millions of spectators all over the world is still not being rewarded in the manner that it should be for their above-average dedication, work ethic and most importantly, money brought in to their employer.

    The NCAA is a multi-billion dollar industry that generated over $845 billion last year due to their players’ ability to entertain and perform to their fullest extent at all times. So with all of this money flowing in why wouldn’t they provide their athletes a stipend?

    When the NCAA was founded by President Roosevelt in 1905, the institution was committed to the idea of not providing a salary or stipend to the student-athletes who took part in its organization. It is based on the idea of amateurism, and this was a notable idea at the time.

    But, over a century later, the NCAA is no longer recognizable compared to what the organization used to be. The NCAA has modernized to take full advantage of the new kinds of sports fans and especially the new kinds of media. Today, sports and athletics in the NCAA draw in around $11 billion every year for the organization. Its coaches and administrators make staggering amounts of money. From high salaries to performance bonuses, it seems that the NCAA is a very profitable business considering it is a non-profit organization.

  2. author
    crazyfish586 18 Jan 2017 01:05

    Remember in the 2012 campaign for the presidency when Barack Obama’s speech on economic development became a meme with the quote, “If you’ve got a business – you didn’t build that”?

    “You didn’t build that” was Obama’s attempt to state that a successful businesses relies on both equal parts of individual initiative and public infrastructure, with Republican Mitt Romney correctly capitalizing on this socialist quip and going on the attack against the idea that big government is somehow the ally of small-business owners and entrepreneurs.

  3. author
    silverbutterfly334 18 Jan 2017 05:35

    Remember in the 2012 campaign for the presidency when Barack Obama’s speech on economic development became a meme with the quote, “If you’ve got a business – you didn’t build that”?

    “You didn’t build that” was Obama’s attempt to state that a successful businesses relies on both equal parts of individual initiative and public infrastructure, with Republican Mitt Romney correctly capitalizing on this socialist quip and going on the attack against the idea that big government is somehow the ally of small-business owners and entrepreneurs.

    There has been major discussion recently if college athletes should or shouldn''t be paid while they are in school. The first thing opponents say is, "They''re already getting a scholarship! That''s more than anybody else! Don''t be greedy!"

    Fine, let''s not be greedy and look at how much a scholarship is actually worth. On average, a full Division 1 scholarship is $25,000 per year.

    Collegiate sports are big money makers, at least that’s what most people think, right? The truth is, the only collegiate sports that really make anything for the colleges are football and basketball, and only the top championship teams really bring in money for their schools. Because the general public sees these teams as cash cows, the debate as to if college athletes should be paid is brought up during every championship season, whether it is the football national championship or March Madness, which occurs each year to determine the champion of college basketball.

    There are a number of reasons why people believe college athletes should be paid . For instance, serious college athletes spend more time practicing their sports and playing the game as most people spend at work each week. In other words, being a college athlete is the equivalent of a full time job. Speaking of jobs, since college athletes are spending so much time on the field or court and in the classroom, they don’t have the time to actually work, so many of them have a difficult time making ends meet.

  4. author
    whiteduck864 18 Jan 2017 06:06

    Google the record attendance at a college football game and ask your self did the crowd pay to get in there? where does the money go? College athletes generate huge amounts of money so getting their share is only fair Don t let some fool tell you their scholarship equals that payment as that s a lie In football at least plenty of guys get injured and many suffer career ending injury s so I believe they should be very well paid for that risk so yeah 1 they earn it and 2 they risk health for it and 3 they work harder than all the rest of the student body as they must train and keep up their grade point average

  5. author
    User1489166989 18 Jan 2017 02:32

    Remember in the 2012 campaign for the presidency when Barack Obama’s speech on economic development became a meme with the quote, “If you’ve got a business – you didn’t build that”?

    “You didn’t build that” was Obama’s attempt to state that a successful businesses relies on both equal parts of individual initiative and public infrastructure, with Republican Mitt Romney correctly capitalizing on this socialist quip and going on the attack against the idea that big government is somehow the ally of small-business owners and entrepreneurs.

    There has been major discussion recently if college athletes should or shouldn''''t be paid while they are in school. The first thing opponents say is, "They''''re already getting a scholarship! That''''s more than anybody else! Don''''t be greedy!"

    Fine, let''''s not be greedy and look at how much a scholarship is actually worth. On average, a full Division 1 scholarship is $25,000 per year.

    Collegiate sports are big money makers, at least that’s what most people think, right? The truth is, the only collegiate sports that really make anything for the colleges are football and basketball, and only the top championship teams really bring in money for their schools. Because the general public sees these teams as cash cows, the debate as to if college athletes should be paid is brought up during every championship season, whether it is the football national championship or March Madness, which occurs each year to determine the champion of college basketball.

    There are a number of reasons why people believe college athletes should be paid. For instance, serious college athletes spend more time practicing their sports and playing the game as most people spend at work each week. In other words, being a college athlete is the equivalent of a full time job. Speaking of jobs, since college athletes are spending so much time on the field or court and in the classroom, they don’t have the time to actually work, so many of them have a difficult time making ends meet.

    What has continued to be one of the most pressing issues in the world of sports today has now become a matter the NCAA can no longer afford to ignore. The service that college athletes provide to the institutions they attend in addition to millions of spectators all over the world is still not being rewarded in the manner that it should be for their above-average dedication, work ethic and most importantly, money brought in to their employer.

    The NCAA is a multi-billion dollar industry that generated over $845 billion last year due to their players’ ability to entertain and perform to their fullest extent at all times. So with all of this money flowing in why wouldn’t they provide their athletes a stipend?

  6. author
    åртēмuc | е бооой 18 Jan 2017 02:28

    Remember in the 2012 campaign for the presidency when Barack Obama’s speech on economic development became a meme with the quote, “If you’ve got a business – you didn’t build that”?

    “You didn’t build that” was Obama’s attempt to state that a successful businesses relies on both equal parts of individual initiative and public infrastructure, with Republican Mitt Romney correctly capitalizing on this socialist quip and going on the attack against the idea that big government is somehow the ally of small-business owners and entrepreneurs.

    There has been major discussion recently if college athletes should or shouldn''''''''''''''''t be paid while they are in school. The first thing opponents say is, "They''''''''''''''''re already getting a scholarship! That''''''''''''''''s more than anybody else! Don''''''''''''''''t be greedy!"

    Fine, let''''''''''''''''s not be greedy and look at how much a scholarship is actually worth. On average, a full Division 1 scholarship is $25,000 per year.

    Collegiate sports are big money makers, at least that’s what most people think, right? The truth is, the only collegiate sports that really make anything for the colleges are football and basketball, and only the top championship teams really bring in money for their schools. Because the general public sees these teams as cash cows, the debate as to if college athletes should be paid is brought up during every championship season, whether it is the football national championship or March Madness, which occurs each year to determine the champion of college basketball.

    There are a number of reasons why people believe college athletes should be paid. For instance, serious college athletes spend more time practicing their sports and playing the game as most people spend at work each week. In other words, being a college athlete is the equivalent of a full time job. Speaking of jobs, since college athletes are spending so much time on the field or court and in the classroom, they don’t have the time to actually work, so many of them have a difficult time making ends meet.

    What has continued to be one of the most pressing issues in the world of sports today has now become a matter the NCAA can no longer afford to ignore. The service that college athletes provide to the institutions they attend in addition to millions of spectators all over the world is still not being rewarded in the manner that it should be for their above-average dedication, work ethic and most importantly, money brought in to their employer.

    The NCAA is a multi-billion dollar industry that generated over $845 billion last year due to their players’ ability to entertain and perform to their fullest extent at all times. So with all of this money flowing in why wouldn’t they provide their athletes a stipend?

    When the NCAA was founded by President Roosevelt in 1905, the institution was committed to the idea of not providing a salary or stipend to the student-athletes who took part in its organization. It is based on the idea of amateurism, and this was a notable idea at the time.

    But, over a century later, the NCAA is no longer recognizable compared to what the organization used to be. The NCAA has modernized to take full advantage of the new kinds of sports fans and especially the new kinds of media. Today, sports and athletics in the NCAA draw in around $11 billion every year for the organization. Its coaches and administrators make staggering amounts of money. From high salaries to performance bonuses, it seems that the NCAA is a very profitable business considering it is a non-profit organization.

    News · 7:42 pm EDT April 6, 2017 · Brianna Stone, University of Texas at Austin

    TECH · 4:22 pm EDT April 6, 2017 · Brianna Stone, University of Texas at Austin

  7. author
    whiteduck608 18 Jan 2017 00:09

    But this understates the exploitation. The athletes in major football and men’s basketball programs are disproportionately black, many from poor and.

  8. author
    fuba_recorder 18 Jan 2017 04:20

    Remember in the 2012 campaign for the presidency when Barack Obama’s speech on economic development became a meme with the quote, “If you’ve got a business – you didn’t build that”?

    “You didn’t build that” was Obama’s attempt to state that a successful businesses relies on both equal parts of individual initiative and public infrastructure, with Republican Mitt Romney correctly capitalizing on this socialist quip and going on the attack against the idea that big government is somehow the ally of small-business owners and entrepreneurs.

    There has been major discussion recently if college athletes should or shouldn't be paid while they are in school. The first thing opponents say is, "They're already getting a scholarship! That's more than anybody else! Don't be greedy!"

    Fine, let's not be greedy and look at how much a scholarship is actually worth. On average, a full Division 1 scholarship is $25,000 per year.

  9. author
    brownelephant279 17 Jan 2017 21:56

    they should get paid. colleges make them "waste" their time doing it, when some athlethes just wanted a scholorship because their families couldn t afford it. They waste time practicing their butts off and that time could be spent studying.

  10. author
    smallelephant446 18 Jan 2017 03:50

    Remember in the 2012 campaign for the presidency when Barack Obama’s speech on economic development became a meme with the quote, “If you’ve got a business – you didn’t build that”?

    “You didn’t build that” was Obama’s attempt to state that a successful businesses relies on both equal parts of individual initiative and public infrastructure, with Republican Mitt Romney correctly capitalizing on this socialist quip and going on the attack against the idea that big government is somehow the ally of small-business owners and entrepreneurs.

    There has been major discussion recently if college athletes should or shouldn''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t be paid while they are in school. The first thing opponents say is, "They''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''re already getting a scholarship! That''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s more than anybody else! Don''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t be greedy!"

    Fine, let''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s not be greedy and look at how much a scholarship is actually worth. On average, a full Division 1 scholarship is $25,000 per year.

    Collegiate sports are big money makers, at least that’s what most people think, right? The truth is, the only collegiate sports that really make anything for the colleges are football and basketball, and only the top championship teams really bring in money for their schools. Because the general public sees these teams as cash cows, the debate as to if college athletes should be paid is brought up during every championship season, whether it is the football national championship or March Madness, which occurs each year to determine the champion of college basketball.

    There are a number of reasons why people believe college athletes should be paid. For instance, serious college athletes spend more time practicing their sports and playing the game as most people spend at work each week. In other words, being a college athlete is the equivalent of a full time job. Speaking of jobs, since college athletes are spending so much time on the field or court and in the classroom, they don’t have the time to actually work, so many of them have a difficult time making ends meet.

    What has continued to be one of the most pressing issues in the world of sports today has now become a matter the NCAA can no longer afford to ignore. The service that college athletes provide to the institutions they attend in addition to millions of spectators all over the world is still not being rewarded in the manner that it should be for their above-average dedication, work ethic and most importantly, money brought in to their employer.

    The NCAA is a multi-billion dollar industry that generated over $845 billion last year due to their players’ ability to entertain and perform to their fullest extent at all times. So with all of this money flowing in why wouldn’t they provide their athletes a stipend?

    When the NCAA was founded by President Roosevelt in 1905, the institution was committed to the idea of not providing a salary or stipend to the student-athletes who took part in its organization. It is based on the idea of amateurism, and this was a notable idea at the time.

    But, over a century later, the NCAA is no longer recognizable compared to what the organization used to be. The NCAA has modernized to take full advantage of the new kinds of sports fans and especially the new kinds of media. Today, sports and athletics in the NCAA draw in around $11 billion every year for the organization. Its coaches and administrators make staggering amounts of money. From high salaries to performance bonuses, it seems that the NCAA is a very profitable business considering it is a non-profit organization.

    News · 7:42 pm EDT April 6, 2017 · Brianna Stone, University of Texas at Austin

    TECH · 4:22 pm EDT April 6, 2017 · Brianna Stone, University of Texas at Austin

  11. author
    purplefrog128 18 Jan 2017 01:09

    Remember in the 2012 campaign for the presidency when Barack Obama’s speech on economic development became a meme with the quote, “If you’ve got a business – you didn’t build that”?

    “You didn’t build that” was Obama’s attempt to state that a successful businesses relies on both equal parts of individual initiative and public infrastructure, with Republican Mitt Romney correctly capitalizing on this socialist quip and going on the attack against the idea that big government is somehow the ally of small-business owners and entrepreneurs.

    There has been major discussion recently if college athletes should or shouldn''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t be paid while they are in school. The first thing opponents say is, "They''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''re already getting a scholarship! That''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s more than anybody else! Don''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t be greedy!"

    Fine, let''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s not be greedy and look at how much a scholarship is actually worth. On average, a full Division 1 scholarship is $25,000 per year.

    Collegiate sports are big money makers, at least that’s what most people think, right? The truth is, the only collegiate sports that really make anything for the colleges are football and basketball, and only the top championship teams really bring in money for their schools. Because the general public sees these teams as cash cows, the debate as to if college athletes should be paid is brought up during every championship season, whether it is the football national championship or March Madness, which occurs each year to determine the champion of college basketball.

    There are a number of reasons why people believe college athletes should be paid. For instance, serious college athletes spend more time practicing their sports and playing the game as most people spend at work each week. In other words, being a college athlete is the equivalent of a full time job. Speaking of jobs, since college athletes are spending so much time on the field or court and in the classroom, they don’t have the time to actually work, so many of them have a difficult time making ends meet.

    What has continued to be one of the most pressing issues in the world of sports today has now become a matter the NCAA can no longer afford to ignore. The service that college athletes provide to the institutions they attend in addition to millions of spectators all over the world is still not being rewarded in the manner that it should be for their above-average dedication, work ethic and most importantly, money brought in to their employer.

    The NCAA is a multi-billion dollar industry that generated over $845 billion last year due to their players’ ability to entertain and perform to their fullest extent at all times. So with all of this money flowing in why wouldn’t they provide their athletes a stipend?

    When the NCAA was founded by President Roosevelt in 1905, the institution was committed to the idea of not providing a salary or stipend to the student-athletes who took part in its organization. It is based on the idea of amateurism, and this was a notable idea at the time.

    But, over a century later, the NCAA is no longer recognizable compared to what the organization used to be. The NCAA has modernized to take full advantage of the new kinds of sports fans and especially the new kinds of media. Today, sports and athletics in the NCAA draw in around $11 billion every year for the organization. Its coaches and administrators make staggering amounts of money. From high salaries to performance bonuses, it seems that the NCAA is a very profitable business considering it is a non-profit organization.

    News · 7:42 pm EDT April 6, 2017 · Brianna Stone, University of Texas at Austin

    TECH · 4:22 pm EDT April 6, 2017 · Brianna Stone, University of Texas at Austin