14

To Kill a Mockingbird Essay?

18 Jan 2017 21:24 | Author: whiteswan698 | Category: Best technical resume template

Lee's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel To Kill a Mockingbird has remained enormously popular since its publication in 1960. Recalling her experiences as a six-year-old from an adult perspective, Jean Louise Finch, nicknamed “Scout,” describes the circumstances involving her widowed father, Atticus, and his legal defense of Tom Robinson, a local black man falsely accused of raping a white woman. In the three years surrounding the trial, Scout and her older brother, Jem, witness the unjust consequences of prejudice and hate while at the same time witnessing the values of courage and integrity through their father's example. Lee's first and only novel, To Kill a Mockingbird was published during the Civil Rights movement, and was hailed as an exposé of Southern racist society. The heroic character of Atticus Finch has been held up as a role model of moral virtue and impeccable character for lawyers to emulate. To Kill a Mockingbird has endured as a mainstay on high school and college reading lists. It was adapted to film in 1962 as a major motion picture starring Gregory Peck.

To Kill a Mockingbird is set in the small, rural town of Maycomb, Alabama, during the early 1930s. The character of Atticus Finch, Scout's father, was based on Lee's own father, a liberal Alabama lawyer and statesman who frequently defended African Americans within the racially prejudiced Southern legal system. Scout and her brother Jem are raised by their father and by Calpurnia, an African-American housekeeper who works for the family. Scout and Jem meet and befriend seven-year-old Dill Harris, a boy who has arrived in Maycomb to stay with his aunt for the summer. Lee has stated that the character of Dill is based on young Truman Capote, a well-known Southern writer and childhood friend. Together with Dill, Scout and Jem make a game of observing “Boo” Radley, a town recluse who has remained inside his house for fifteen years, trying to provoke him to come outside. Local myth holds that Boo eats live squirrels and prowls the streets at night, and the children's perception of him is colored by such tales. In the fall, Dill returns to his family in the North and Scout enters the first grade. Scout and Jem begin to discover mysterious objects, designed to intrigue children, hidden in a tree on the Radley property.

Comments
  1. author
    heavycat343 18 Jan 2017 07:28

    The following entry provides criticism on Lee''''''''s novel To Kill a Mockingbird. See also Harper Lee Contemporary Literary Criticism.

    SOURCE: Smykowski, Adam. “Symbolism and Racism in To Kill a Mockingbird. ” In Readings on “To Kill a Mockingbird,” edited by Terry O''''''''Neill, pp. 52-6. San Diego, Calif.: Greenhaven Press, 2000.

    To Kill a Mockingbird is a novel by Harper Lee published in 1960. It was immediately successful, winning the Pulitzer Prize , and has become a classic of modern American literature. The plot and characters are loosely based on Lee''''s observations of her family, her neighbors and an event that occurred near her hometown of Monroeville, Alabama in 1936, when she was 10 years old.

    The novel is renowned for its warmth and humor, despite dealing with the serious issues of rape and racial inequality. The narrator''''s father, Atticus Finch , has served as a moral hero for many readers and as a model of integrity for lawyers. One critic explains the novel''''s impact by writing, "In the twentieth century, To Kill a Mockingbird is probably the most widely read book dealing with race in America, and its protagonist , Atticus Finch, the most enduring fictional image of racial heroism." [1]

    The free To Kill a Mockingbird notes include comprehensive information and analysis to help you understand the book. These free notes consist of about 78 pages (23,208 words) and contain the following sections:

    To Kill a Mockingbird is a coming-of-age story of Scout Finch and her brother, Jem, in 1930's Alabama. Through their neighborhood meanderings and the example of their father, they grow to understand that the world isn't always fair and that prejudice is a very real aspect of their world no matter how subtle it seems.

  2. author
    Сергей Поликарпов 18 Jan 2017 08:42

    The following entry provides criticism on Lee''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s novel To Kill a Mockingbird. See also Harper Lee Contemporary Literary Criticism.

    SOURCE: Smykowski, Adam. “Symbolism and Racism in To Kill a Mockingbird. ” In Readings on “To Kill a Mockingbird,” edited by Terry O''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''Neill, pp. 52-6. San Diego, Calif.: Greenhaven Press, 2000.

    To Kill a Mockingbird is a novel by Harper Lee published in 1960. It was immediately successful, winning the Pulitzer Prize , and has become a classic of modern American literature. The plot and characters are loosely based on Lee''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s observations of her family, her neighbors and an event that occurred near her hometown of Monroeville, Alabama in 1936, when she was 10 years old.

    The novel is renowned for its warmth and humor, despite dealing with the serious issues of rape and racial inequality. The narrator''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s father, Atticus Finch , has served as a moral hero for many readers and as a model of integrity for lawyers. One critic explains the novel''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s impact by writing, "In the twentieth century, To Kill a Mockingbird is probably the most widely read book dealing with race in America, and its protagonist , Atticus Finch, the most enduring fictional image of racial heroism." [1]

    The free To Kill a Mockingbird notes include comprehensive information and analysis to help you understand the book. These free notes consist of about 78 pages (23,208 words) and contain the following sections:

    To Kill a Mockingbird is a coming-of-age story of Scout Finch and her brother, Jem, in 1930''''''''s Alabama. Through their neighborhood meanderings and the example of their father, they grow to understand that the world isn''''''''t always fair and that prejudice is a very real aspect of their world no matter how subtle it seems.

    Scout Finch lives with her brother Jem and father Atticus in Maycomb, Alabama during the Great Depression. Scout spends her summers playing with Jem and their friend Dill, who visits his aunt in Maycomb each summer. The children become obsessed with Boo Radley, the reclusive neighbor rumored to have stabbed his own father in the leg with a pair of scissors. During the school year, Boo leaves small presents for Scout and Jem in a knothole.

    At the end of the novel, Scout walks Boo back to his house, stopping for a moment on his porch to look out at the town from his perspective: the children playing, leaves turning, Miss Maudie’s house burning. Scout tells Atticus that Boo was really nice. She has finally learned the lesson he tried to teach her earlier in the novel: that you can’t really understand a person until you walk in their shoes. Scout’s story may be about losing one’s innocence, but it’s also about coming of age, and that’s what makes this novel one of the most popular novels of all time.

  3. author
    beautifulwolf464 18 Jan 2017 02:44

    The following entry provides criticism on Lee''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s novel To Kill a Mockingbird. See also Harper Lee Contemporary Literary Criticism.

    SOURCE: Smykowski, Adam. “Symbolism and Racism in To Kill a Mockingbird. ” In Readings on “To Kill a Mockingbird,” edited by Terry O''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''Neill, pp. 52-6. San Diego, Calif.: Greenhaven Press, 2000.

    To Kill a Mockingbird is a novel by Harper Lee published in 1960. It was immediately successful, winning the Pulitzer Prize , and has become a classic of modern American literature. The plot and characters are loosely based on Lee''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s observations of her family, her neighbors and an event that occurred near her hometown of Monroeville, Alabama in 1936, when she was 10 years old.

    The novel is renowned for its warmth and humor, despite dealing with the serious issues of rape and racial inequality. The narrator''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s father, Atticus Finch , has served as a moral hero for many readers and as a model of integrity for lawyers. One critic explains the novel''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s impact by writing, "In the twentieth century, To Kill a Mockingbird is probably the most widely read book dealing with race in America, and its protagonist , Atticus Finch, the most enduring fictional image of racial heroism." [1]

    The free To Kill a Mockingbird notes include comprehensive information and analysis to help you understand the book. These free notes consist of about 78 pages (23,208 words) and contain the following sections:

    To Kill a Mockingbird is a coming-of-age story of Scout Finch and her brother, Jem, in 1930''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s Alabama. Through their neighborhood meanderings and the example of their father, they grow to understand that the world isn''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t always fair and that prejudice is a very real aspect of their world no matter how subtle it seems.

    Scout Finch lives with her brother Jem and father Atticus in Maycomb, Alabama during the Great Depression. Scout spends her summers playing with Jem and their friend Dill, who visits his aunt in Maycomb each summer. The children become obsessed with Boo Radley, the reclusive neighbor rumored to have stabbed his own father in the leg with a pair of scissors. During the school year, Boo leaves small presents for Scout and Jem in a knothole.

    At the end of the novel, Scout walks Boo back to his house, stopping for a moment on his porch to look out at the town from his perspective: the children playing, leaves turning, Miss Maudie’s house burning. Scout tells Atticus that Boo was really nice. She has finally learned the lesson he tried to teach her earlier in the novel: that you can’t really understand a person until you walk in their shoes. Scout’s story may be about losing one’s innocence, but it’s also about coming of age, and that’s what makes this novel one of the most popular novels of all time.

    A list of Policy and Resource Documents for the Ontario Curriculum: Secondary are available. This page contains useful and current tools that apply to all publicly funded elementary and secondary English-language schools in Ontario.

    Which test are you preparing for? Click for comprehensive study guides and strategies for performing your best on test day all for free!

  4. author
    User1488743308 18 Jan 2017 02:09

    Did you read the book?? How do you expect us to give you the conclusion?? You should have read the book and done your own homework. Sorry.

  5. author
    User1491148960 17 Jan 2017 22:04

    The following entry provides criticism on Lee''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s novel To Kill a Mockingbird. See also Harper Lee Contemporary Literary Criticism.

    SOURCE: Smykowski, Adam. “Symbolism and Racism in To Kill a Mockingbird. ” In Readings on “To Kill a Mockingbird,” edited by Terry O''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''Neill, pp. 52-6. San Diego, Calif.: Greenhaven Press, 2000.

    To Kill a Mockingbird is a novel by Harper Lee published in 1960. It was immediately successful, winning the Pulitzer Prize , and has become a classic of modern American literature. The plot and characters are loosely based on Lee''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s observations of her family, her neighbors and an event that occurred near her hometown of Monroeville, Alabama in 1936, when she was 10 years old.

    The novel is renowned for its warmth and humor, despite dealing with the serious issues of rape and racial inequality. The narrator''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s father, Atticus Finch , has served as a moral hero for many readers and as a model of integrity for lawyers. One critic explains the novel''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s impact by writing, "In the twentieth century, To Kill a Mockingbird is probably the most widely read book dealing with race in America, and its protagonist , Atticus Finch, the most enduring fictional image of racial heroism." [1]

    The free To Kill a Mockingbird notes include comprehensive information and analysis to help you understand the book. These free notes consist of about 78 pages (23,208 words) and contain the following sections:

    To Kill a Mockingbird is a coming-of-age story of Scout Finch and her brother, Jem, in 1930''''''''''''''''s Alabama. Through their neighborhood meanderings and the example of their father, they grow to understand that the world isn''''''''''''''''t always fair and that prejudice is a very real aspect of their world no matter how subtle it seems.

    Scout Finch lives with her brother Jem and father Atticus in Maycomb, Alabama during the Great Depression. Scout spends her summers playing with Jem and their friend Dill, who visits his aunt in Maycomb each summer. The children become obsessed with Boo Radley, the reclusive neighbor rumored to have stabbed his own father in the leg with a pair of scissors. During the school year, Boo leaves small presents for Scout and Jem in a knothole.

    At the end of the novel, Scout walks Boo back to his house, stopping for a moment on his porch to look out at the town from his perspective: the children playing, leaves turning, Miss Maudie’s house burning. Scout tells Atticus that Boo was really nice. She has finally learned the lesson he tried to teach her earlier in the novel: that you can’t really understand a person until you walk in their shoes. Scout’s story may be about losing one’s innocence, but it’s also about coming of age, and that’s what makes this novel one of the most popular novels of all time.

    A list of Policy and Resource Documents for the Ontario Curriculum: Secondary are available. This page contains useful and current tools that apply to all publicly funded elementary and secondary English-language schools in Ontario.

  6. author
    User1490491791 18 Jan 2017 05:26

    The following entry provides criticism on Lee''''''''''''''''s novel To Kill a Mockingbird. See also Harper Lee Contemporary Literary Criticism.

    SOURCE: Smykowski, Adam. “Symbolism and Racism in To Kill a Mockingbird. ” In Readings on “To Kill a Mockingbird,” edited by Terry O''''''''''''''''Neill, pp. 52-6. San Diego, Calif.: Greenhaven Press, 2000.

    To Kill a Mockingbird is a novel by Harper Lee published in 1960. It was immediately successful, winning the Pulitzer Prize , and has become a classic of modern American literature. The plot and characters are loosely based on Lee''''''''s observations of her family, her neighbors and an event that occurred near her hometown of Monroeville, Alabama in 1936, when she was 10 years old.

    The novel is renowned for its warmth and humor, despite dealing with the serious issues of rape and racial inequality. The narrator''''''''s father, Atticus Finch , has served as a moral hero for many readers and as a model of integrity for lawyers. One critic explains the novel''''''''s impact by writing, "In the twentieth century, To Kill a Mockingbird is probably the most widely read book dealing with race in America, and its protagonist , Atticus Finch, the most enduring fictional image of racial heroism." [1]

    The free To Kill a Mockingbird notes include comprehensive information and analysis to help you understand the book. These free notes consist of about 78 pages (23,208 words) and contain the following sections:

    To Kill a Mockingbird is a coming-of-age story of Scout Finch and her brother, Jem, in 1930''s Alabama. Through their neighborhood meanderings and the example of their father, they grow to understand that the world isn''t always fair and that prejudice is a very real aspect of their world no matter how subtle it seems.

    Scout Finch lives with her brother Jem and father Atticus in Maycomb, Alabama during the Great Depression. Scout spends her summers playing with Jem and their friend Dill, who visits his aunt in Maycomb each summer. The children become obsessed with Boo Radley, the reclusive neighbor rumored to have stabbed his own father in the leg with a pair of scissors. During the school year, Boo leaves small presents for Scout and Jem in a knothole.

    At the end of the novel, Scout walks Boo back to his house, stopping for a moment on his porch to look out at the town from his perspective: the children playing, leaves turning, Miss Maudie’s house burning. Scout tells Atticus that Boo was really nice. She has finally learned the lesson he tried to teach her earlier in the novel: that you can’t really understand a person until you walk in their shoes. Scout’s story may be about losing one’s innocence, but it’s also about coming of age, and that’s what makes this novel one of the most popular novels of all time.

  7. author
    User1488108568 18 Jan 2017 08:47

    The following entry provides criticism on Lee''s novel To Kill a Mockingbird. See also Harper Lee Contemporary Literary Criticism.

    SOURCE: Smykowski, Adam. “Symbolism and Racism in To Kill a Mockingbird. ” In Readings on “To Kill a Mockingbird,” edited by Terry O''Neill, pp. 52-6. San Diego, Calif.: Greenhaven Press, 2000.

    To Kill a Mockingbird is a novel by Harper Lee published in 1960. It was immediately successful, winning the Pulitzer Prize , and has become a classic of modern American literature. The plot and characters are loosely based on Lee's observations of her family, her neighbors and an event that occurred near her hometown of Monroeville, Alabama in 1936, when she was 10 years old.

    The novel is renowned for its warmth and humor, despite dealing with the serious issues of rape and racial inequality. The narrator's father, Atticus Finch , has served as a moral hero for many readers and as a model of integrity for lawyers. One critic explains the novel's impact by writing, "In the twentieth century, To Kill a Mockingbird is probably the most widely read book dealing with race in America, and its protagonist , Atticus Finch, the most enduring fictional image of racial heroism." [1]

  8. author
    零泉千秋のATM 😘 18 Jan 2017 01:22

    The following entry provides criticism on Lee''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s novel To Kill a Mockingbird. See also Harper Lee Contemporary Literary Criticism.

    SOURCE: Smykowski, Adam. “Symbolism and Racism in To Kill a Mockingbird. ” In Readings on “To Kill a Mockingbird,” edited by Terry O''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''Neill, pp. 52-6. San Diego, Calif.: Greenhaven Press, 2000.

    To Kill a Mockingbird is a novel by Harper Lee published in 1960. It was immediately successful, winning the Pulitzer Prize , and has become a classic of modern American literature. The plot and characters are loosely based on Lee''''''''''''''''s observations of her family, her neighbors and an event that occurred near her hometown of Monroeville, Alabama in 1936, when she was 10 years old.

    The novel is renowned for its warmth and humor, despite dealing with the serious issues of rape and racial inequality. The narrator''''''''''''''''s father, Atticus Finch , has served as a moral hero for many readers and as a model of integrity for lawyers. One critic explains the novel''''''''''''''''s impact by writing, "In the twentieth century, To Kill a Mockingbird is probably the most widely read book dealing with race in America, and its protagonist , Atticus Finch, the most enduring fictional image of racial heroism." [1]

    The free To Kill a Mockingbird notes include comprehensive information and analysis to help you understand the book. These free notes consist of about 78 pages (23,208 words) and contain the following sections:

    To Kill a Mockingbird is a coming-of-age story of Scout Finch and her brother, Jem, in 1930''''s Alabama. Through their neighborhood meanderings and the example of their father, they grow to understand that the world isn''''t always fair and that prejudice is a very real aspect of their world no matter how subtle it seems.

    Scout Finch lives with her brother Jem and father Atticus in Maycomb, Alabama during the Great Depression. Scout spends her summers playing with Jem and their friend Dill, who visits his aunt in Maycomb each summer. The children become obsessed with Boo Radley, the reclusive neighbor rumored to have stabbed his own father in the leg with a pair of scissors. During the school year, Boo leaves small presents for Scout and Jem in a knothole.

    At the end of the novel, Scout walks Boo back to his house, stopping for a moment on his porch to look out at the town from his perspective: the children playing, leaves turning, Miss Maudie’s house burning. Scout tells Atticus that Boo was really nice. She has finally learned the lesson he tried to teach her earlier in the novel: that you can’t really understand a person until you walk in their shoes. Scout’s story may be about losing one’s innocence, but it’s also about coming of age, and that’s what makes this novel one of the most popular novels of all time.

  9. author
    purplegoose842 17 Jan 2017 22:35

    The following entry provides criticism on Lee''''s novel To Kill a Mockingbird. See also Harper Lee Contemporary Literary Criticism.

    SOURCE: Smykowski, Adam. “Symbolism and Racism in To Kill a Mockingbird. ” In Readings on “To Kill a Mockingbird,” edited by Terry O''''Neill, pp. 52-6. San Diego, Calif.: Greenhaven Press, 2000.

    To Kill a Mockingbird is a novel by Harper Lee published in 1960. It was immediately successful, winning the Pulitzer Prize , and has become a classic of modern American literature. The plot and characters are loosely based on Lee''s observations of her family, her neighbors and an event that occurred near her hometown of Monroeville, Alabama in 1936, when she was 10 years old.

    The novel is renowned for its warmth and humor, despite dealing with the serious issues of rape and racial inequality. The narrator''s father, Atticus Finch , has served as a moral hero for many readers and as a model of integrity for lawyers. One critic explains the novel''s impact by writing, "In the twentieth century, To Kill a Mockingbird is probably the most widely read book dealing with race in America, and its protagonist , Atticus Finch, the most enduring fictional image of racial heroism." [1]

  10. author
    smallswan788 17 Jan 2017 22:39

    Order essay here to kill a mockingbird essays pdf

    Lee''s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel To Kill a Mockingbird has remained enormously popular since its publication in 1960. Recalling her experiences as a six-year-old from an adult perspective, Jean Louise Finch, nicknamed “Scout,” describes the circumstances involving her widowed father, Atticus, and his legal defense of Tom Robinson, a local black man falsely accused of raping a white woman. In the three years surrounding the trial, Scout and her older brother, Jem, witness the unjust consequences of prejudice and hate while at the same time witnessing the values of courage and integrity through their father''s example. Lee''s first and only novel, To Kill a Mockingbird was published during the Civil Rights movement, and was hailed as an exposé of Southern racist society. The heroic character of Atticus Finch has been held up as a role model of moral virtue and impeccable character for lawyers to emulate. To Kill a Mockingbird has endured as a mainstay on high school and college reading lists. It was adapted to film in 1962 as a major motion picture starring Gregory Peck.

    To Kill a Mockingbird is set in the small, rural town of Maycomb, Alabama, during the early 1930s. The character of Atticus Finch, Scout''s father, was based on Lee''s own father, a liberal Alabama lawyer and statesman who frequently defended African Americans within the racially prejudiced Southern legal system. Scout and her brother Jem are raised by their father and by Calpurnia, an African-American housekeeper who works for the family. Scout and Jem meet and befriend seven-year-old Dill Harris, a boy who has arrived in Maycomb to stay with his aunt for the summer. Lee has stated that the character of Dill is based on young Truman Capote, a well-known Southern writer and childhood friend. Together with Dill, Scout and Jem make a game of observing “Boo” Radley, a town recluse who has remained inside his house for fifteen years, trying to provoke him to come outside. Local myth holds that Boo eats live squirrels and prowls the streets at night, and the children''s perception of him is colored by such tales. In the fall, Dill returns to his family in the North and Scout enters the first grade. Scout and Jem begin to discover mysterious objects, designed to intrigue children, hidden in a tree on the Radley property.

  11. author
    organicbutterfly354 18 Jan 2017 00:58

    there is somewhat a lesson of courage when the old lady (i dont recall her name) gets over her addiction to her medicine before she finally passes away. i havent read that book in a long time, so thats all the help i can give you right now. sorry!

  12. author
    User1487934519 18 Jan 2017 03:19

    The following entry provides criticism on Lee''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s novel To Kill a Mockingbird. See also Harper Lee Contemporary Literary Criticism.

    SOURCE: Smykowski, Adam. “Symbolism and Racism in To Kill a Mockingbird. ” In Readings on “To Kill a Mockingbird,” edited by Terry O''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''Neill, pp. 52-6. San Diego, Calif.: Greenhaven Press, 2000.

    To Kill a Mockingbird is a novel by Harper Lee published in 1960. It was immediately successful, winning the Pulitzer Prize , and has become a classic of modern American literature. The plot and characters are loosely based on Lee''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s observations of her family, her neighbors and an event that occurred near her hometown of Monroeville, Alabama in 1936, when she was 10 years old.

    The novel is renowned for its warmth and humor, despite dealing with the serious issues of rape and racial inequality. The narrator''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s father, Atticus Finch , has served as a moral hero for many readers and as a model of integrity for lawyers. One critic explains the novel''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s impact by writing, "In the twentieth century, To Kill a Mockingbird is probably the most widely read book dealing with race in America, and its protagonist , Atticus Finch, the most enduring fictional image of racial heroism." [1]

    The free To Kill a Mockingbird notes include comprehensive information and analysis to help you understand the book. These free notes consist of about 78 pages (23,208 words) and contain the following sections:

    To Kill a Mockingbird is a coming-of-age story of Scout Finch and her brother, Jem, in 1930''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s Alabama. Through their neighborhood meanderings and the example of their father, they grow to understand that the world isn''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t always fair and that prejudice is a very real aspect of their world no matter how subtle it seems.

    Scout Finch lives with her brother Jem and father Atticus in Maycomb, Alabama during the Great Depression. Scout spends her summers playing with Jem and their friend Dill, who visits his aunt in Maycomb each summer. The children become obsessed with Boo Radley, the reclusive neighbor rumored to have stabbed his own father in the leg with a pair of scissors. During the school year, Boo leaves small presents for Scout and Jem in a knothole.

    At the end of the novel, Scout walks Boo back to his house, stopping for a moment on his porch to look out at the town from his perspective: the children playing, leaves turning, Miss Maudie’s house burning. Scout tells Atticus that Boo was really nice. She has finally learned the lesson he tried to teach her earlier in the novel: that you can’t really understand a person until you walk in their shoes. Scout’s story may be about losing one’s innocence, but it’s also about coming of age, and that’s what makes this novel one of the most popular novels of all time.

    A list of Policy and Resource Documents for the Ontario Curriculum: Secondary are available. This page contains useful and current tools that apply to all publicly funded elementary and secondary English-language schools in Ontario.

  13. author
    silverleopard830 17 Jan 2017 23:21

    As to sites with chapter summaries, themes and/or annotated quotations, I am reticent to recommend sites to which you might turn in lieu of reading the novel; however, IF you provide the appropriate attribution (citation), the following URLs should be very helpful: http://www.shmoop.com/to-kill-a-mockingbird/ and http://www.gradesaver.com/to-kill-a-mockingbird/study-guide/section6/ and http://www.bookrags.com/notes/tkm/QUO.html I should add that the book s text may be found at the following URL: http://photo.goodreads.com/documents/1239291793books/2660.pdf [NOTE: To arrive at the site, you may have to use File>Open>and then insert immediately after that part of the URL that Yahoo! Answers shows the following 9291793books/2660.pdf ] Substantial portions of the text are availbale at the following URLs: http://www.wssb.wa.gov/content/Classrooms/tate/content/sophomores/stories/To_Kill_A_Mocking_Bird/start.htm and http://www.wattpad.com/3550-To-Kill-A-Mockingbird-Harper-Lee Good luck!