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SparkNotes: Walden: Context

18 Jan 2017 21:24 | Author: Εlfеn! [2코양일] | Category: Resume sur la guerre de troie naura pas lieu

Resistance to Civil Government ( Civil Disobedience ) is an essay by American transcendentalist Henry David Thoreau that was first published in 1849. In it, Thoreau argues that individuals should not permit governments to overrule or atrophy their consciences , and that they have a duty to avoid allowing such acquiescence to enable the government to make them the agents of injustice. Thoreau was motivated in part by his disgust with slavery and the Mexican–American War (1846–1848).

In 1848, Thoreau gave lectures at the Concord Lyceum entitled "The Rights and Duties of the Individual in relation to Government." [1] This formed the basis for his essay, which was first published under the title Resistance to Civil Government in 1849 in an anthology called Æsthetic Papers. The latter title distinguished Thoreau's program from that of the " non-resistants " ( anarcho - pacifists ) who were expressing similar views. Resistance also served as part of Thoreau's metaphor comparing the government to a machine: when the machine was producing injustice, it was the duty of conscientious citizens to be "a counter friction" (i.e., a resistance) "to stop the machine." [2]

Comments
  1. author
    smallpeacock135 18 Jan 2017 02:35

  2. author
    Не у Европску унију! 18 Jan 2017 05:31

    Resistance to Civil Government ( Civil Disobedience ) is an essay by American transcendentalist Henry David Thoreau that was first published in 1849. In it, Thoreau argues that individuals should not permit governments to overrule or atrophy their consciences , and that they have a duty to avoid allowing such acquiescence to enable the government to make them the agents of injustice. Thoreau was motivated in part by his disgust with slavery and the Mexican–American War (1846–1848).

    The slavery crisis inflamed New England in the 1840s and 1850s. The environment became especially tense after the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850. A lifelong abolitionist , Thoreau delivered an impassioned speech which would later become Civil Disobedience in 1848, just months after leaving Walden Pond. The speech dealt with slavery, but at the same time excoriated American imperialism , particularly the Mexican–American War. [4]

    Henry David Thoreau (see name pronunciation ; July 12, 1817 – May 6, 1862) was an American essayist , poet , philosopher , abolitionist , naturalist , tax resister , development critic , surveyor , and historian. A leading transcendentalist , [2] Thoreau is best known for his book Walden , a reflection upon simple living in natural surroundings, and his essay " Civil Disobedience " (originally published as "Resistance to Civil Government"), an argument for disobedience to an unjust state.

    He was a lifelong abolitionist, delivering lectures that attacked the Fugitive Slave Law while praising the writings of Wendell Phillips and defending the abolitionist John Brown. Thoreau''''s philosophy of civil disobedience later influenced the political thoughts and actions of such notable figures as Leo Tolstoy , Mahatma Gandhi , and Martin Luther King Jr.

    The answer to question 2 accurately notes that "Thoreau is no true socialist," but fails to flesh out the primary foundation to support the statement. Socialism is a political force that is firmly rooted in collectivism where the mob (i.e. "society") uses the force of gov''t to impose its will on the individuals in the minority. Thoreau clearly abhorred such vile abuse of power. He was a staunch individualist whose actions and writings were universally and diametrically opposed to use of force by the state to impose on people he understood we. Read more

    If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. ( Walden , 326)

    Thoreau also believed that independent, well-considered action arose naturally from a questing attitude of mind. He was first and foremost an explorer, of both the world around him and the world within him.

    be a Columbus to whole new continents and worlds within you, opening new channels, not of trade, but of thought. ( Walden , 321)

  3. author
    ticklishgorilla133 18 Jan 2017 05:23

    1.) Thoreau states that governments are more harmful than helpful. Democracy is no cure for this. 2.) a- Those that are wealthy and put consumption, wealth and greed above humanity are to blame for what is wrong with society. b- The cost/benefit analysis is negative for the rich. Those that are wealthy would loose too much money civil disobedience.

  4. author
    х.о.ㅤㅤ 17 Jan 2017 23:47

    Would you mind citing your source for this alleged opinion of Thoreau s? I find it extremely hard to believe he ever said/wrote anything like that since he was such a great dissenter himself. Far from being against dissent, Thoreau wrote a famous essay, "On Civil Disobedience" which states that dissent is sometimes both right and necessary and which inspired at least two other famous dissenters: Ghandi and Martin Luther King. "The essay is individualist, secular, anarchist, elitist and anti-democratic; but it has influenced persons of great religious devotion, leaders of collective campaigns, and members of resistance movements." Here s an excerpt from the intro: "I HEARTILY ACCEPT the motto, — "That government is best which governs least";(1) and I should like to see it acted up to more rapidly and systematically. Carried out, it finally amounts to this, which also I believe, — "That government is best which governs not at all"; and when men are prepared for it, that will be the kind of government which they will have. Government is at best but an expedient; but most governments are usually, and all governments are sometimes, inexpedient." For more, please click on the first link. In fact, he was jailed for dissenting: " “Civil Disobedience” was Thoreau’s response to his 1846 imprisonment for refusing to pay a poll tax that violated his conscience. He exclaimed in “Civil Disobedience, "Must the citizen ever for a moment, or in the least degree, resign his conscience to the legislator? Why has every man a conscience then? I think that we should be men first, and subjects afterward. It is not desirable to cultivate a respect for the law, so much as for the right. The only obligation which I have a right to assume is to do at any time what I think right." And, when his friend, Ralph Waldo Emerson visited him there, the following exchange took place: Emerson asked “Henry, what are you doing in there?” Thoreau replied, “Waldo, the question is what are you doing out there?” I ve read almost everything he wrote and I can recall no such sentiment. I see you cite his essay "On Civil Disobedience" as your source. I challenge you to find such an opinion in that essay. You can read the essay by clicking on the first link.

  5. author
    愛弥那εïз-あやな- 18 Jan 2017 03:38

    Resistance to Civil Government ( Civil Disobedience ) is an essay by American transcendentalist Henry David Thoreau that was first published in 1849. In it, Thoreau argues that individuals should not permit governments to overrule or atrophy their consciences , and that they have a duty to avoid allowing such acquiescence to enable the government to make them the agents of injustice. Thoreau was motivated in part by his disgust with slavery and the Mexican–American War (1846–1848).

    The slavery crisis inflamed New England in the 1840s and 1850s. The environment became especially tense after the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850. A lifelong abolitionist , Thoreau delivered an impassioned speech which would later become Civil Disobedience in 1848, just months after leaving Walden Pond. The speech dealt with slavery, but at the same time excoriated American imperialism , particularly the Mexican–American War. [4]

    Henry David Thoreau (see name pronunciation ; July 12, 1817 – May 6, 1862) was an American essayist , poet , philosopher , abolitionist , naturalist , tax resister , development critic , surveyor , and historian. A leading transcendentalist , [2] Thoreau is best known for his book Walden , a reflection upon simple living in natural surroundings, and his essay " Civil Disobedience " (originally published as "Resistance to Civil Government"), an argument for disobedience to an unjust state.

    He was a lifelong abolitionist, delivering lectures that attacked the Fugitive Slave Law while praising the writings of Wendell Phillips and defending the abolitionist John Brown. Thoreau's philosophy of civil disobedience later influenced the political thoughts and actions of such notable figures as Leo Tolstoy , Mahatma Gandhi , and Martin Luther King Jr.

  6. author
    blackfrog785 18 Jan 2017 06:01

    This essay was written in 1995 for an exhibit commemorating the 150th anniversary of Thoreau's move to Walden Pond and his writing of the American classic, Walden; it.

  7. author
    goldenwolf814 18 Jan 2017 00:13

    On a trouvé celle qui n est pas rentré du WE

  8. author
    heavypanda385 18 Jan 2017 01:41

    They both are basically taking a stance on their belief WITHOUT violence. Skim over this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Civil_Disobedience_(Thoreau) "Indian independence leader Mohandas Gandhi was impressed by Thoreau s arguments. In 1907, about one year into his first satyagraha campaign in South Africa, he wrote a translated synopsis of Thoreau s argument for Indian Opinion, credited Thoreau s essay with being "the chief cause of the abolition of slavery in America", and wrote that "Both his example and writings are at present exactly applicable to the Indians in the Transvaal."[17] He later concluded: Thoreau was a great writer, philosopher, poet, and withal a most practical man, that is, he taught nothing he was not prepared to practice in himself. He was one of the greatest and most moral men America has produced. At the time of the abolition of slavery movement, he wrote his famous essay "On the Duty of Civil Disobedience". He went to gaol for the sake of his principles and suffering humanity. His essay has, therefore, been sanctified by suffering. Moreover, it is written for all time. Its incisive logic is unanswerable. —"For Passive Resisters" (1907)[18]"

  9. author
    т а н я. 18 Jan 2017 05:58

    Resistance to Civil Government ( Civil Disobedience ) is an essay by American transcendentalist Henry David Thoreau that was first published in 1849. In it, Thoreau argues that individuals should not permit governments to overrule or atrophy their consciences , and that they have a duty to avoid allowing such acquiescence to enable the government to make them the agents of injustice. Thoreau was motivated in part by his disgust with slavery and the Mexican–American War (1846–1848).

    The slavery crisis inflamed New England in the 1840s and 1850s. The environment became especially tense after the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850. A lifelong abolitionist , Thoreau delivered an impassioned speech which would later become Civil Disobedience in 1848, just months after leaving Walden Pond. The speech dealt with slavery, but at the same time excoriated American imperialism , particularly the Mexican–American War. [4]

    Henry David Thoreau (see name pronunciation ; July 12, 1817 – May 6, 1862) was an American essayist , poet , philosopher , abolitionist , naturalist , tax resister , development critic , surveyor , and historian. A leading transcendentalist , [2] Thoreau is best known for his book Walden , a reflection upon simple living in natural surroundings, and his essay " Civil Disobedience " (originally published as "Resistance to Civil Government"), an argument for disobedience to an unjust state.

    He was a lifelong abolitionist, delivering lectures that attacked the Fugitive Slave Law while praising the writings of Wendell Phillips and defending the abolitionist John Brown. Thoreau''s philosophy of civil disobedience later influenced the political thoughts and actions of such notable figures as Leo Tolstoy , Mahatma Gandhi , and Martin Luther King Jr.

    The answer to question 2 accurately notes that "Thoreau is no true socialist," but fails to flesh out the primary foundation to support the statement. Socialism is a political force that is firmly rooted in collectivism where the mob (i.e. "society") uses the force of gov't to impose its will on the individuals in the minority. Thoreau clearly abhorred such vile abuse of power. He was a staunch individualist whose actions and writings were universally and diametrically opposed to use of force by the state to impose on people he understood we. Read more