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Aquinas’ Cosmological Argument for the Existence of God

18 Jan 2017 21:24 | Author: crazyostrich135 | Category: Church turing thesis artificial intelligence

Saint Thomas Aquinas O.P. ( / ə ˈ k w aɪ n ə s / ; Italian : Tommaso d'Aquino , lit. 'Thomas of Aquino '; 1225 – 7 March 1274), was an Italian [3] [4] Dominican friar , Catholic priest , and Doctor of the Church. He was an immensely influential philosopher , theologian , and jurist in the tradition of scholasticism , within which he is also known as the Doctor Angelicus and the Doctor Communis . [5] The name Aquinas identifies his ancestral origins in the county of Aquino in present-day Lazio.

He was the foremost classical proponent of natural theology and the father of Thomism. His influence on Western thought is considerable, and much of modern philosophy developed or opposed his ideas, particularly in the areas of ethics, natural law , metaphysics, and political theory. Unlike many currents in the Church of the time, [6] Thomas embraced several ideas put forward by Aristotle—whom he called "the Philosopher"—and attempted to synthesize Aristotelian philosophy with the principles of Christianity. [7] The works for which he is best known are the Summa Theologiae and the Summa contra Gentiles . His commentaries on Scripture and on Aristotle form an important part of his body of work. Furthermore, Thomas is distinguished for his eucharistic hymns, which form a part of the Church's liturgy. [8]

Comments
  1. author
    Андрей_П 18 Jan 2017 09:11

    Saint Thomas Aquinas O.P. ( / ə ˈ k w aɪ n ə s / ; Italian : Tommaso d''Aquino , lit. ''Thomas of Aquino ''; 1225 – 7 March 1274), was an Italian [3] [4] Dominican friar , Catholic priest , and Doctor of the Church. He was an immensely influential philosopher , theologian , and jurist in the tradition of scholasticism , within which he is also known as the Doctor Angelicus and the Doctor Communis . [5] The name Aquinas identifies his ancestral origins in the county of Aquino in present-day Lazio.

    The Catholic Church honors Thomas Aquinas as a saint and regards him as the model teacher for those studying for the priesthood, and indeed the highest expression of both natural reason and speculative theology. In modern times, under papal directives, the study of his works was long used as a core of the required program of study for those seeking ordination as priests or deacons, as well as for those in religious formation and for other students of the sacred disciplines (philosophy, Catholic theology, church history, liturgy, and canon law ). [9]

    This is the Thomistic method through and through. Intellectual knowledge for St. Thomas Aquinas is not universal, necessary, or infallible as it is for Descartes and Kant. He never starts with forms or with the mind. Along with Aristotle, he states that nothing comes to the mind that is first not apprehended by the senses, because knowledge of reality, in all its nine accidents, in all its individuality, uniqueness and particularity is primary. Intellectual knowledge is secondary and subsequent to sense-knowledge, and we might add, who appeals to our senses like Gerard Manley Hopkins?

    Now we shall explore the Thomistic view of creation, not the scholastic view of creation. Thomism is not scholasticism, nor ever will be. St. Thomas Aquinas begins every article of his work with a question. He loves the doctrine of Aristotle, that all learning begins with a question. Not so with the scholastics. They give you the answers without ever asking questions. In a word, there is a big difference between indoctrination and education.

  2. author
    heavyfrog523 18 Jan 2017 09:17

    Great sages, buddhist monks and other people have experienced god after practicing years a certain type of meditation. For example American journalist Elizabeth Gilbert in her true story "Eat Pray Love" describes her experience of god she had while deep in meditation: “As a reader and seeker, I always get frustrated at the description in spiritual memoirs of experiencing god. From the Buddha to Saint Teresa to the Sufi mystics to my own Guru—so many great souls over the centuries have tried to express what it feels like to become one with the divine, but I’m never quite satisfied by these descriptions. After rigorous practice of meditation I have finally found out. What I experienced is indescribable but I’ll try to explain anyway: Simply put, I got pulled through into the Absolute, and in that rush I suddenly understood the workings of the universe completely. I left my body, I left the room, I left the planet, I stepped through time and I entered the void. I was inside the void, but I also was the void and I was looking at the void, all at the same time. The void was a place of limitless peace and wisdom. The void was conscious and it was intelligent. The void was God, I was inside God, I was part of God. In addition to being God, I was both a tiny piece of the universe and exactly the same size as the universe. (“All know that the drop merges into the ocean, but few know that the ocean merges into the drop,” wrote the sage Kabir—and I can personally attest now that this is true.) It wasn’t hallucinogenic, what I was feeling. It was the most basic of events. It was heaven, yes. It was the deepest love I’d ever experienced, beyond anything I could have previously imagined, but it wasn’t euphoric. There wasn’t enough ego or passion left in me to create euphoria and excitement. It was just obvious. "

  3. author
    ৯ ฝ ھٓ м̵̵¸¸5/5 18 Jan 2017 05:26

    Saint Thomas Aquinas O.P. ( / ə ˈ k w aɪ n ə s / ; Italian : Tommaso d''''Aquino , lit. ''''Thomas of Aquino ''''; 1225 – 7 March 1274), was an Italian [3] [4] Dominican friar , Catholic priest , and Doctor of the Church. He was an immensely influential philosopher , theologian , and jurist in the tradition of scholasticism , within which he is also known as the Doctor Angelicus and the Doctor Communis . [5] The name Aquinas identifies his ancestral origins in the county of Aquino in present-day Lazio.

    The Catholic Church honors Thomas Aquinas as a saint and regards him as the model teacher for those studying for the priesthood, and indeed the highest expression of both natural reason and speculative theology. In modern times, under papal directives, the study of his works was long used as a core of the required program of study for those seeking ordination as priests or deacons, as well as for those in religious formation and for other students of the sacred disciplines (philosophy, Catholic theology, church history, liturgy, and canon law ). [9]

    This is the Thomistic method through and through. Intellectual knowledge for St. Thomas Aquinas is not universal, necessary, or infallible as it is for Descartes and Kant. He never starts with forms or with the mind. Along with Aristotle, he states that nothing comes to the mind that is first not apprehended by the senses, because knowledge of reality, in all its nine accidents, in all its individuality, uniqueness and particularity is primary. Intellectual knowledge is secondary and subsequent to sense-knowledge, and we might add, who appeals to our senses like Gerard Manley Hopkins?

    Now we shall explore the Thomistic view of creation, not the scholastic view of creation. Thomism is not scholasticism, nor ever will be. St. Thomas Aquinas begins every article of his work with a question. He loves the doctrine of Aristotle, that all learning begins with a question. Not so with the scholastics. They give you the answers without ever asking questions. In a word, there is a big difference between indoctrination and education.

    In addition to his moral philosophy , Thomas Aquinas (1225-1274) is well-known for his theological writings.   He is arguably the most eminent philosophical theologian ever to have lived.  To this day, it is difficult to find someone whose work rivals Aquinas' in breadth and influence.  Although his work is not limited to illuminating Christian doctrine, virtually all of what he wrote is shaped by his theology.  Therefore it seems appropriate to consider some of the theological themes and ideas that figure prominently in his thought.

    Aquinas concedes that, for some people, God’s existence will be a matter of faith.  After all, not everyone will be able to grasp the proofs for God’s existence.  Thus for some people it is perfectly appropriate to accept on the basis of sacred teaching that which others attempt to demonstrate by means of reason ( ST Ia 2.2 ad 1).

  4. author
    smallbird787 18 Jan 2017 08:33

    Saint Thomas Aquinas O.P. ( / ə ˈ k w aɪ n ə s / ; Italian : Tommaso d''''''''Aquino , lit. ''''''''Thomas of Aquino ''''''''; 1225 – 7 March 1274), was an Italian [3] [4] Dominican friar , Catholic priest , and Doctor of the Church. He was an immensely influential philosopher , theologian , and jurist in the tradition of scholasticism , within which he is also known as the Doctor Angelicus and the Doctor Communis . [5] The name Aquinas identifies his ancestral origins in the county of Aquino in present-day Lazio.

    The Catholic Church honors Thomas Aquinas as a saint and regards him as the model teacher for those studying for the priesthood, and indeed the highest expression of both natural reason and speculative theology. In modern times, under papal directives, the study of his works was long used as a core of the required program of study for those seeking ordination as priests or deacons, as well as for those in religious formation and for other students of the sacred disciplines (philosophy, Catholic theology, church history, liturgy, and canon law ). [9]

    This is the Thomistic method through and through. Intellectual knowledge for St. Thomas Aquinas is not universal, necessary, or infallible as it is for Descartes and Kant. He never starts with forms or with the mind. Along with Aristotle, he states that nothing comes to the mind that is first not apprehended by the senses, because knowledge of reality, in all its nine accidents, in all its individuality, uniqueness and particularity is primary. Intellectual knowledge is secondary and subsequent to sense-knowledge, and we might add, who appeals to our senses like Gerard Manley Hopkins?

    Now we shall explore the Thomistic view of creation, not the scholastic view of creation. Thomism is not scholasticism, nor ever will be. St. Thomas Aquinas begins every article of his work with a question. He loves the doctrine of Aristotle, that all learning begins with a question. Not so with the scholastics. They give you the answers without ever asking questions. In a word, there is a big difference between indoctrination and education.

    In addition to his moral philosophy , Thomas Aquinas (1225-1274) is well-known for his theological writings.   He is arguably the most eminent philosophical theologian ever to have lived.  To this day, it is difficult to find someone whose work rivals Aquinas'' in breadth and influence.  Although his work is not limited to illuminating Christian doctrine, virtually all of what he wrote is shaped by his theology.  Therefore it seems appropriate to consider some of the theological themes and ideas that figure prominently in his thought.

    Aquinas concedes that, for some people, God’s existence will be a matter of faith.  After all, not everyone will be able to grasp the proofs for God’s existence.  Thus for some people it is perfectly appropriate to accept on the basis of sacred teaching that which others attempt to demonstrate by means of reason ( ST Ia 2.2 ad 1).

  5. author
    crazysnake946 18 Jan 2017 02:45

    motion is relative.

  6. author
    yellowbutterfly263 18 Jan 2017 08:55

    Saint Thomas Aquinas O.P. ( / ə ˈ k w aɪ n ə s / ; Italian : Tommaso d'Aquino , lit. 'Thomas of Aquino '; 1225 – 7 March 1274), was an Italian [3] [4] Dominican friar , Catholic priest , and Doctor of the Church. He was an immensely influential philosopher , theologian , and jurist in the tradition of scholasticism , within which he is also known as the Doctor Angelicus and the Doctor Communis . [5] The name Aquinas identifies his ancestral origins in the county of Aquino in present-day Lazio.

    The Catholic Church honors Thomas Aquinas as a saint and regards him as the model teacher for those studying for the priesthood, and indeed the highest expression of both natural reason and speculative theology. In modern times, under papal directives, the study of his works was long used as a core of the required program of study for those seeking ordination as priests or deacons, as well as for those in religious formation and for other students of the sacred disciplines (philosophy, Catholic theology, church history, liturgy, and canon law ). [9]

  7. author
    heavyswan588 18 Jan 2017 02:49

    Saint Thomas Aquinas O.P. ( / ə ˈ k w aɪ n ə s / ; Italian : Tommaso d''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''Aquino , lit. ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''Thomas of Aquino ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''; 1225 – 7 March 1274), was an Italian [3] [4] Dominican friar , Catholic priest , and Doctor of the Church. He was an immensely influential philosopher , theologian , and jurist in the tradition of scholasticism , within which he is also known as the Doctor Angelicus and the Doctor Communis . [5] The name Aquinas identifies his ancestral origins in the county of Aquino in present-day Lazio.

    The Catholic Church honors Thomas Aquinas as a saint and regards him as the model teacher for those studying for the priesthood, and indeed the highest expression of both natural reason and speculative theology. In modern times, under papal directives, the study of his works was long used as a core of the required program of study for those seeking ordination as priests or deacons, as well as for those in religious formation and for other students of the sacred disciplines (philosophy, Catholic theology, church history, liturgy, and canon law ). [9]

    This is the Thomistic method through and through. Intellectual knowledge for St. Thomas Aquinas is not universal, necessary, or infallible as it is for Descartes and Kant. He never starts with forms or with the mind. Along with Aristotle, he states that nothing comes to the mind that is first not apprehended by the senses, because knowledge of reality, in all its nine accidents, in all its individuality, uniqueness and particularity is primary. Intellectual knowledge is secondary and subsequent to sense-knowledge, and we might add, who appeals to our senses like Gerard Manley Hopkins?

    Now we shall explore the Thomistic view of creation, not the scholastic view of creation. Thomism is not scholasticism, nor ever will be. St. Thomas Aquinas begins every article of his work with a question. He loves the doctrine of Aristotle, that all learning begins with a question. Not so with the scholastics. They give you the answers without ever asking questions. In a word, there is a big difference between indoctrination and education.

    In addition to his moral philosophy , Thomas Aquinas (1225-1274) is well-known for his theological writings.   He is arguably the most eminent philosophical theologian ever to have lived.  To this day, it is difficult to find someone whose work rivals Aquinas'''''''' in breadth and influence.  Although his work is not limited to illuminating Christian doctrine, virtually all of what he wrote is shaped by his theology.  Therefore it seems appropriate to consider some of the theological themes and ideas that figure prominently in his thought.

    Aquinas concedes that, for some people, God’s existence will be a matter of faith.  After all, not everyone will be able to grasp the proofs for God’s existence.  Thus for some people it is perfectly appropriate to accept on the basis of sacred teaching that which others attempt to demonstrate by means of reason ( ST Ia 2.2 ad 1).

    Natural theology is a program of inquiry into the existence and attributes of God without referring or appealing to any divine revelation. In natural theology, one asks what the word “God” means, whether and how names can be applied to God, whether God exists, whether God knows the future free choices of creatures, and so forth. The aim is to answer those questions without using any claims drawn from any sacred texts or divine revelation, even though one may hold such claims.

    We have now come to call the development of this non-poetic or non-mythological form of thought from the pre-Socratics through Plato and Aristotle by the name of “philosophy.” Aristotle’s arguments for the existence of God, because they argued from some feature of nature, came to be called “natural theology.” Natural theology was part of philosophy, as opposed to being part of the mytho-poetic theology.

  8. author
    blackgorilla222 18 Jan 2017 03:00

    No. I am a fan of Thomas Paine also. Read the book "The God Delusion" it is the opposite of what you asked for.

  9. author
    purpledog877 18 Jan 2017 02:45

    Saint Thomas Aquinas O.P. (/ ə ˈ k w aɪ n ə s /; Italian: Tommaso d'Aquino, lit. 'Thomas of Aquino'; 1225 – 7 March 1274), was an Italian Dominican friar.

  10. author
    ArtLeaks 18 Jan 2017 01:54

    Saint Thomas Aquinas O.P. ( / ə ˈ k w aɪ n ə s / ; Italian : Tommaso d''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''Aquino , lit. ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''Thomas of Aquino ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''; 1225 – 7 March 1274), was an Italian [3] [4] Dominican friar , Catholic priest , and Doctor of the Church. He was an immensely influential philosopher , theologian , and jurist in the tradition of scholasticism , within which he is also known as the Doctor Angelicus and the Doctor Communis . [5] The name Aquinas identifies his ancestral origins in the county of Aquino in present-day Lazio.

    The Catholic Church honors Thomas Aquinas as a saint and regards him as the model teacher for those studying for the priesthood, and indeed the highest expression of both natural reason and speculative theology. In modern times, under papal directives, the study of his works was long used as a core of the required program of study for those seeking ordination as priests or deacons, as well as for those in religious formation and for other students of the sacred disciplines (philosophy, Catholic theology, church history, liturgy, and canon law ). [9]

    This is the Thomistic method through and through. Intellectual knowledge for St. Thomas Aquinas is not universal, necessary, or infallible as it is for Descartes and Kant. He never starts with forms or with the mind. Along with Aristotle, he states that nothing comes to the mind that is first not apprehended by the senses, because knowledge of reality, in all its nine accidents, in all its individuality, uniqueness and particularity is primary. Intellectual knowledge is secondary and subsequent to sense-knowledge, and we might add, who appeals to our senses like Gerard Manley Hopkins?

    Now we shall explore the Thomistic view of creation, not the scholastic view of creation. Thomism is not scholasticism, nor ever will be. St. Thomas Aquinas begins every article of his work with a question. He loves the doctrine of Aristotle, that all learning begins with a question. Not so with the scholastics. They give you the answers without ever asking questions. In a word, there is a big difference between indoctrination and education.

    In addition to his moral philosophy , Thomas Aquinas (1225-1274) is well-known for his theological writings.   He is arguably the most eminent philosophical theologian ever to have lived.  To this day, it is difficult to find someone whose work rivals Aquinas'''''''''''''''' in breadth and influence.  Although his work is not limited to illuminating Christian doctrine, virtually all of what he wrote is shaped by his theology.  Therefore it seems appropriate to consider some of the theological themes and ideas that figure prominently in his thought.

    Aquinas concedes that, for some people, God’s existence will be a matter of faith.  After all, not everyone will be able to grasp the proofs for God’s existence.  Thus for some people it is perfectly appropriate to accept on the basis of sacred teaching that which others attempt to demonstrate by means of reason ( ST Ia 2.2 ad 1).

    Natural theology is a program of inquiry into the existence and attributes of God without referring or appealing to any divine revelation. In natural theology, one asks what the word “God” means, whether and how names can be applied to God, whether God exists, whether God knows the future free choices of creatures, and so forth. The aim is to answer those questions without using any claims drawn from any sacred texts or divine revelation, even though one may hold such claims.

    We have now come to call the development of this non-poetic or non-mythological form of thought from the pre-Socratics through Plato and Aristotle by the name of “philosophy.” Aristotle’s arguments for the existence of God, because they argued from some feature of nature, came to be called “natural theology.” Natural theology was part of philosophy, as opposed to being part of the mytho-poetic theology.

    In monotheism , God is conceived of as the Supreme Being and principal object of faith. [3] The concept of God as described by most theologians includes the attributes of omniscience (infinite knowledge), omnipotence (unlimited power), omnipresence (present everywhere), divine simplicity , and as having an eternal and necessary existence. Many theologians also describe God as being omnibenevolent (perfectly good) and all loving.

    God has been conceived as either personal or impersonal. In theism , God is the creator and sustainer of the universe , while in deism , God is the creator, but not the sustainer, of the universe. In pantheism , God is the universe itself. In atheism , God is not believed to exist, while God is deemed unknown or unknowable within the context of agnosticism. God has also been conceived as the source of all moral obligation , and the "greatest conceivable existent". [3] Many notable philosophers have developed arguments for and against the existence of God. [8]

  11. author
    redbear339 18 Jan 2017 05:00

    Saint Thomas Aquinas O.P. ( / ə ˈ k w aɪ n ə s / ; Italian : Tommaso d''''''''''''''''Aquino , lit. ''''''''''''''''Thomas of Aquino ''''''''''''''''; 1225 – 7 March 1274), was an Italian [3] [4] Dominican friar , Catholic priest , and Doctor of the Church. He was an immensely influential philosopher , theologian , and jurist in the tradition of scholasticism , within which he is also known as the Doctor Angelicus and the Doctor Communis . [5] The name Aquinas identifies his ancestral origins in the county of Aquino in present-day Lazio.

    The Catholic Church honors Thomas Aquinas as a saint and regards him as the model teacher for those studying for the priesthood, and indeed the highest expression of both natural reason and speculative theology. In modern times, under papal directives, the study of his works was long used as a core of the required program of study for those seeking ordination as priests or deacons, as well as for those in religious formation and for other students of the sacred disciplines (philosophy, Catholic theology, church history, liturgy, and canon law ). [9]

    This is the Thomistic method through and through. Intellectual knowledge for St. Thomas Aquinas is not universal, necessary, or infallible as it is for Descartes and Kant. He never starts with forms or with the mind. Along with Aristotle, he states that nothing comes to the mind that is first not apprehended by the senses, because knowledge of reality, in all its nine accidents, in all its individuality, uniqueness and particularity is primary. Intellectual knowledge is secondary and subsequent to sense-knowledge, and we might add, who appeals to our senses like Gerard Manley Hopkins?

    Now we shall explore the Thomistic view of creation, not the scholastic view of creation. Thomism is not scholasticism, nor ever will be. St. Thomas Aquinas begins every article of his work with a question. He loves the doctrine of Aristotle, that all learning begins with a question. Not so with the scholastics. They give you the answers without ever asking questions. In a word, there is a big difference between indoctrination and education.

    In addition to his moral philosophy , Thomas Aquinas (1225-1274) is well-known for his theological writings.   He is arguably the most eminent philosophical theologian ever to have lived.  To this day, it is difficult to find someone whose work rivals Aquinas'''' in breadth and influence.  Although his work is not limited to illuminating Christian doctrine, virtually all of what he wrote is shaped by his theology.  Therefore it seems appropriate to consider some of the theological themes and ideas that figure prominently in his thought.

    Aquinas concedes that, for some people, God’s existence will be a matter of faith.  After all, not everyone will be able to grasp the proofs for God’s existence.  Thus for some people it is perfectly appropriate to accept on the basis of sacred teaching that which others attempt to demonstrate by means of reason ( ST Ia 2.2 ad 1).

  12. author
    ticklishswan385 18 Jan 2017 09:12

    Saint Thomas Aquinas O.P. ( / ə ˈ k w aɪ n ə s / ; Italian : Tommaso d''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''Aquino , lit. ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''Thomas of Aquino ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''; 1225 – 7 March 1274), was an Italian [3] [4] Dominican friar , Catholic priest , and Doctor of the Church. He was an immensely influential philosopher , theologian , and jurist in the tradition of scholasticism , within which he is also known as the Doctor Angelicus and the Doctor Communis . [5] The name Aquinas identifies his ancestral origins in the county of Aquino in present-day Lazio.

    The Catholic Church honors Thomas Aquinas as a saint and regards him as the model teacher for those studying for the priesthood, and indeed the highest expression of both natural reason and speculative theology. In modern times, under papal directives, the study of his works was long used as a core of the required program of study for those seeking ordination as priests or deacons, as well as for those in religious formation and for other students of the sacred disciplines (philosophy, Catholic theology, church history, liturgy, and canon law ). [9]

    This is the Thomistic method through and through. Intellectual knowledge for St. Thomas Aquinas is not universal, necessary, or infallible as it is for Descartes and Kant. He never starts with forms or with the mind. Along with Aristotle, he states that nothing comes to the mind that is first not apprehended by the senses, because knowledge of reality, in all its nine accidents, in all its individuality, uniqueness and particularity is primary. Intellectual knowledge is secondary and subsequent to sense-knowledge, and we might add, who appeals to our senses like Gerard Manley Hopkins?

    Now we shall explore the Thomistic view of creation, not the scholastic view of creation. Thomism is not scholasticism, nor ever will be. St. Thomas Aquinas begins every article of his work with a question. He loves the doctrine of Aristotle, that all learning begins with a question. Not so with the scholastics. They give you the answers without ever asking questions. In a word, there is a big difference between indoctrination and education.

    In addition to his moral philosophy , Thomas Aquinas (1225-1274) is well-known for his theological writings.   He is arguably the most eminent philosophical theologian ever to have lived.  To this day, it is difficult to find someone whose work rivals Aquinas'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''' in breadth and influence.  Although his work is not limited to illuminating Christian doctrine, virtually all of what he wrote is shaped by his theology.  Therefore it seems appropriate to consider some of the theological themes and ideas that figure prominently in his thought.

    Aquinas concedes that, for some people, God’s existence will be a matter of faith.  After all, not everyone will be able to grasp the proofs for God’s existence.  Thus for some people it is perfectly appropriate to accept on the basis of sacred teaching that which others attempt to demonstrate by means of reason ( ST Ia 2.2 ad 1).

    Natural theology is a program of inquiry into the existence and attributes of God without referring or appealing to any divine revelation. In natural theology, one asks what the word “God” means, whether and how names can be applied to God, whether God exists, whether God knows the future free choices of creatures, and so forth. The aim is to answer those questions without using any claims drawn from any sacred texts or divine revelation, even though one may hold such claims.

    We have now come to call the development of this non-poetic or non-mythological form of thought from the pre-Socratics through Plato and Aristotle by the name of “philosophy.” Aristotle’s arguments for the existence of God, because they argued from some feature of nature, came to be called “natural theology.” Natural theology was part of philosophy, as opposed to being part of the mytho-poetic theology.

    In monotheism , God is conceived of as the Supreme Being and principal object of faith. [3] The concept of God as described by most theologians includes the attributes of omniscience (infinite knowledge), omnipotence (unlimited power), omnipresence (present everywhere), divine simplicity , and as having an eternal and necessary existence. Many theologians also describe God as being omnibenevolent (perfectly good) and all loving.

    God has been conceived as either personal or impersonal. In theism , God is the creator and sustainer of the universe , while in deism , God is the creator, but not the sustainer, of the universe. In pantheism , God is the universe itself. In atheism , God is not believed to exist, while God is deemed unknown or unknowable within the context of agnosticism. God has also been conceived as the source of all moral obligation , and the "greatest conceivable existent". [3] Many notable philosophers have developed arguments for and against the existence of God. [8]

    What this Thomistic method produces is, in its own way, a “safe space” for conversation, but it is a safe space for adults and not timorous children. It wouldn’t be a bad model for our present discussion of serious things.

    Pivotal Players , Catholic Social Teaching , Reason , Religious Liberty , Social Justice , Truth , Philosophy , Scandal , New Evangelization , Catholic Church

  13. author
    lazyelephant327 18 Jan 2017 07:36

    Saint Thomas Aquinas O.P. ( / ə ˈ k w aɪ n ə s / ; Italian : Tommaso d''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''Aquino , lit. ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''Thomas of Aquino ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''; 1225 – 7 March 1274), was an Italian [3] [4] Dominican friar , Catholic priest , and Doctor of the Church. He was an immensely influential philosopher , theologian , and jurist in the tradition of scholasticism , within which he is also known as the Doctor Angelicus and the Doctor Communis . [5] The name Aquinas identifies his ancestral origins in the county of Aquino in present-day Lazio.

    The Catholic Church honors Thomas Aquinas as a saint and regards him as the model teacher for those studying for the priesthood, and indeed the highest expression of both natural reason and speculative theology. In modern times, under papal directives, the study of his works was long used as a core of the required program of study for those seeking ordination as priests or deacons, as well as for those in religious formation and for other students of the sacred disciplines (philosophy, Catholic theology, church history, liturgy, and canon law ). [9]

    This is the Thomistic method through and through. Intellectual knowledge for St. Thomas Aquinas is not universal, necessary, or infallible as it is for Descartes and Kant. He never starts with forms or with the mind. Along with Aristotle, he states that nothing comes to the mind that is first not apprehended by the senses, because knowledge of reality, in all its nine accidents, in all its individuality, uniqueness and particularity is primary. Intellectual knowledge is secondary and subsequent to sense-knowledge, and we might add, who appeals to our senses like Gerard Manley Hopkins?

    Now we shall explore the Thomistic view of creation, not the scholastic view of creation. Thomism is not scholasticism, nor ever will be. St. Thomas Aquinas begins every article of his work with a question. He loves the doctrine of Aristotle, that all learning begins with a question. Not so with the scholastics. They give you the answers without ever asking questions. In a word, there is a big difference between indoctrination and education.

    In addition to his moral philosophy , Thomas Aquinas (1225-1274) is well-known for his theological writings.   He is arguably the most eminent philosophical theologian ever to have lived.  To this day, it is difficult to find someone whose work rivals Aquinas'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''' in breadth and influence.  Although his work is not limited to illuminating Christian doctrine, virtually all of what he wrote is shaped by his theology.  Therefore it seems appropriate to consider some of the theological themes and ideas that figure prominently in his thought.

    Aquinas concedes that, for some people, God’s existence will be a matter of faith.  After all, not everyone will be able to grasp the proofs for God’s existence.  Thus for some people it is perfectly appropriate to accept on the basis of sacred teaching that which others attempt to demonstrate by means of reason ( ST Ia 2.2 ad 1).

    Natural theology is a program of inquiry into the existence and attributes of God without referring or appealing to any divine revelation. In natural theology, one asks what the word “God” means, whether and how names can be applied to God, whether God exists, whether God knows the future free choices of creatures, and so forth. The aim is to answer those questions without using any claims drawn from any sacred texts or divine revelation, even though one may hold such claims.

    We have now come to call the development of this non-poetic or non-mythological form of thought from the pre-Socratics through Plato and Aristotle by the name of “philosophy.” Aristotle’s arguments for the existence of God, because they argued from some feature of nature, came to be called “natural theology.” Natural theology was part of philosophy, as opposed to being part of the mytho-poetic theology.

    In monotheism , God is conceived of as the Supreme Being and principal object of faith. [3] The concept of God as described by most theologians includes the attributes of omniscience (infinite knowledge), omnipotence (unlimited power), omnipresence (present everywhere), divine simplicity , and as having an eternal and necessary existence. Many theologians also describe God as being omnibenevolent (perfectly good) and all loving.

    God has been conceived as either personal or impersonal. In theism , God is the creator and sustainer of the universe , while in deism , God is the creator, but not the sustainer, of the universe. In pantheism , God is the universe itself. In atheism , God is not believed to exist, while God is deemed unknown or unknowable within the context of agnosticism. God has also been conceived as the source of all moral obligation , and the "greatest conceivable existent". [3] Many notable philosophers have developed arguments for and against the existence of God. [8]

    What this Thomistic method produces is, in its own way, a “safe space” for conversation, but it is a safe space for adults and not timorous children. It wouldn’t be a bad model for our present discussion of serious things.

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