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What is the "Theory of Forms"?

18 Jan 2017 21:24 | Author: greenduck440 | Category: Restaurant server resume sample

Views on Philosophy and Metaphysics of Education: Albert Einstein, Jean Jacques Rousseau, Michel de Montaigne, Aristotle, Plato

Comments
  1. author
    yellowelephant519 18 Jan 2017 09:00

    Philosophy of education can refer either to the application of philosophy to the problem of education , examining the definition, goals and meaning of education, or to any particular vision of or approach to education.

    Philosophy of education can also be understood not as an academic discipline but as a normative educational theory that unifies pedagogy , curriculum , learning theory, and the purpose of education and is grounded in specific metaphysical, epistemological, and axiological assumptions. These theories are also called educational philosophies. For example, a teacher might be said to follow a perennialist educational philosophy or to follow a perennialist philosophy of education.

    John Locke was born in 1632 in Wrington, a small village in southwestern England. His father, also named John, was a legal clerk and served with the Parliamentary forces in the English Civil War. His family was well-to-do, but not of particularly high social or economic standing. Locke spent his childhood in the West Country and as a teenager was sent to Westminster School in London.

    Locke engaged in a number of controversies during his life, including a notable one with Jonas Proast over toleration. But Locke’s most famous and philosophically important controversy was with Edward Stillingfleet, the Bishop of Worcester. Stillingfleet, in addition to being a powerful political and theological figure, was an astute and forceful critic. The two men debated a number of the positions in the Essay in a series of published letters.

    Since the 20th century professional philosophers contribute to society primarily as professors , researchers and writers. However, many of those who study philosophy in undergraduate or graduate programs contribute in the fields of law, journalism, politics, religion, science, business and various art and entertainment activities. [26]

    Traditionally, the term "philosophy" referred to any body of knowledge. [14] [27] In this sense, philosophy is closely related to religion, mathematics, natural science, education and politics. Newton''''''''s 1687 " Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy " is classified in the 2000s as a book of physics; he used the term " natural philosophy " because it used to encompass disciplines that later became associated with sciences such as astronomy , medicine and physics. [15]

    Hence, while in the contemporary context a central tension within philosophy of education has been between its philosophical, disciplinary aspirations and its relevance to educational policy and practice, at earlier points in its development this dichotomy would not have been recognized, either from the perspective of the philosopher or from the perspective of the educationist.

    It is during this period that we see the first codified account of the phrase philosophy of education in Paul Monroe’s Cyclopedia of Education in 1911-13 (Chambliss 1996). We see the beginnings of the argument for requiring courses in the preparation of educators that seek to promote the systematic, grounded formulation and justification of educational aims. And we see, significantly, the first professional organization dedicated to philosophical reflection on education, the John Dewey Society (JDS), in 1935.

  2. author
    smalldog433 18 Jan 2017 04:50

    Philosophy of education can refer either to the application of philosophy to the problem of education , examining the definition, goals and meaning of education, or to any particular vision of or approach to education.

    Philosophy of education can also be understood not as an academic discipline but as a normative educational theory that unifies pedagogy , curriculum , learning theory, and the purpose of education and is grounded in specific metaphysical, epistemological, and axiological assumptions. These theories are also called educational philosophies. For example, a teacher might be said to follow a perennialist educational philosophy or to follow a perennialist philosophy of education.

    John Locke was born in 1632 in Wrington, a small village in southwestern England. His father, also named John, was a legal clerk and served with the Parliamentary forces in the English Civil War. His family was well-to-do, but not of particularly high social or economic standing. Locke spent his childhood in the West Country and as a teenager was sent to Westminster School in London.

    Locke engaged in a number of controversies during his life, including a notable one with Jonas Proast over toleration. But Locke’s most famous and philosophically important controversy was with Edward Stillingfleet, the Bishop of Worcester. Stillingfleet, in addition to being a powerful political and theological figure, was an astute and forceful critic. The two men debated a number of the positions in the Essay in a series of published letters.

    Since the 20th century professional philosophers contribute to society primarily as professors , researchers and writers. However, many of those who study philosophy in undergraduate or graduate programs contribute in the fields of law, journalism, politics, religion, science, business and various art and entertainment activities. [26]

    Traditionally, the term "philosophy" referred to any body of knowledge. [14] [27] In this sense, philosophy is closely related to religion, mathematics, natural science, education and politics. Newton''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s 1687 " Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy " is classified in the 2000s as a book of physics; he used the term " natural philosophy " because it used to encompass disciplines that later became associated with sciences such as astronomy , medicine and physics. [15]

    Hence, while in the contemporary context a central tension within philosophy of education has been between its philosophical, disciplinary aspirations and its relevance to educational policy and practice, at earlier points in its development this dichotomy would not have been recognized, either from the perspective of the philosopher or from the perspective of the educationist.

    It is during this period that we see the first codified account of the phrase philosophy of education in Paul Monroe’s Cyclopedia of Education in 1911-13 (Chambliss 1996). We see the beginnings of the argument for requiring courses in the preparation of educators that seek to promote the systematic, grounded formulation and justification of educational aims. And we see, significantly, the first professional organization dedicated to philosophical reflection on education, the John Dewey Society (JDS), in 1935.

    We should never be ashamed to approve truth or acquire it,
    no matter what its source might be, even if it might have come
    from foreign peoples and alien nations far removed from us.
    To him who seeks the truth, no other object is higher in value.
    -- Rasa''''il al-Kindi (810-873) Arab philosopher and physician 1

    As a matter of daily practice, educators formulate goals, discuss values, and set priorities. Anyone who gets involved in dealing with goals, values and priorities soon realizes that in a modern society such as ours there are many competing choices. Some are incompatible with others. Hard decisions have to be made. Here, for example, are some everyday dilemmas that educators confront: How do we treat a specific student''''s needs, yet deal fairly with a class of students as a whole? When, if ever, should we bend the rules? Should a teacher ever emphasize good behavior over subject skills?

    The Philosophy, Religion and Education course at Newman is for students who enjoy thinking about and debating the big questions facing individuals and society. The course will extend your understanding of religions and cultures, and engage with contemporary issues such as ethical values and the human search for identity and meaning.

    The course uses a variety of assessments to help develop a range of different skills from traditional essay and report writing to oral presentations, analysis tasks, textual commentaries, case studies, portfolios, web design, reflective logs and research projects. Assessment is by coursework and practical only - there are no written examinations.

    The term “innovative education” has been presented to scientific community by American pedagogue James Botkin about twenty years ago and received numerous and rather controversial response, for it suggested complete and irreversible revision of the principles traditional educational theories consider to be axiomatic.

    To begin with, while traditional education considers the main value of educational process to be the knowledge transferred to the student, Botkin’s innovative education presents the knowledge as a means rather than an end, at the same time orienting at the development of the student’s personality through knowledge. It is less concerned with controlling the educational process, trying to create circumstances in which the student would establish his or her own goals and achieve them, while transforming his or her own self and self-regulating the studying process.

  3. author
    Вениамин Баренко 18 Jan 2017 09:36

    Republicans want to do away with the Department of Education, which is incredibly dumb.

  4. author
    Why not? 18 Jan 2017 07:14

    Philosophy of education can refer either to the application of philosophy to the problem of education , examining the definition, goals and meaning of education, or to any particular vision of or approach to education.

    Philosophy of education can also be understood not as an academic discipline but as a normative educational theory that unifies pedagogy , curriculum , learning theory, and the purpose of education and is grounded in specific metaphysical, epistemological, and axiological assumptions. These theories are also called educational philosophies. For example, a teacher might be said to follow a perennialist educational philosophy or to follow a perennialist philosophy of education.

    John Locke was born in 1632 in Wrington, a small village in southwestern England. His father, also named John, was a legal clerk and served with the Parliamentary forces in the English Civil War. His family was well-to-do, but not of particularly high social or economic standing. Locke spent his childhood in the West Country and as a teenager was sent to Westminster School in London.

    Locke engaged in a number of controversies during his life, including a notable one with Jonas Proast over toleration. But Locke’s most famous and philosophically important controversy was with Edward Stillingfleet, the Bishop of Worcester. Stillingfleet, in addition to being a powerful political and theological figure, was an astute and forceful critic. The two men debated a number of the positions in the Essay in a series of published letters.

    Since the 20th century professional philosophers contribute to society primarily as professors , researchers and writers. However, many of those who study philosophy in undergraduate or graduate programs contribute in the fields of law, journalism, politics, religion, science, business and various art and entertainment activities. [26]

    Traditionally, the term "philosophy" referred to any body of knowledge. [14] [27] In this sense, philosophy is closely related to religion, mathematics, natural science, education and politics. Newton''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s 1687 " Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy " is classified in the 2000s as a book of physics; he used the term " natural philosophy " because it used to encompass disciplines that later became associated with sciences such as astronomy , medicine and physics. [15]

    Hence, while in the contemporary context a central tension within philosophy of education has been between its philosophical, disciplinary aspirations and its relevance to educational policy and practice, at earlier points in its development this dichotomy would not have been recognized, either from the perspective of the philosopher or from the perspective of the educationist.

    It is during this period that we see the first codified account of the phrase philosophy of education in Paul Monroe’s Cyclopedia of Education in 1911-13 (Chambliss 1996). We see the beginnings of the argument for requiring courses in the preparation of educators that seek to promote the systematic, grounded formulation and justification of educational aims. And we see, significantly, the first professional organization dedicated to philosophical reflection on education, the John Dewey Society (JDS), in 1935.

    We should never be ashamed to approve truth or acquire it,
    no matter what its source might be, even if it might have come
    from foreign peoples and alien nations far removed from us.
    To him who seeks the truth, no other object is higher in value.
    -- Rasa''il al-Kindi (810-873) Arab philosopher and physician 1

    As a matter of daily practice, educators formulate goals, discuss values, and set priorities. Anyone who gets involved in dealing with goals, values and priorities soon realizes that in a modern society such as ours there are many competing choices. Some are incompatible with others. Hard decisions have to be made. Here, for example, are some everyday dilemmas that educators confront: How do we treat a specific student''s needs, yet deal fairly with a class of students as a whole? When, if ever, should we bend the rules? Should a teacher ever emphasize good behavior over subject skills?

    The Philosophy, Religion and Education course at Newman is for students who enjoy thinking about and debating the big questions facing individuals and society. The course will extend your understanding of religions and cultures, and engage with contemporary issues such as ethical values and the human search for identity and meaning.

    The course uses a variety of assessments to help develop a range of different skills from traditional essay and report writing to oral presentations, analysis tasks, textual commentaries, case studies, portfolios, web design, reflective logs and research projects. Assessment is by coursework and practical only - there are no written examinations.

  5. author
    brownmouse898 18 Jan 2017 04:33

    Philosophy of education can refer either to the application of philosophy to the problem of education , examining the definition, goals and meaning of education, or to any particular vision of or approach to education.

    Philosophy of education can also be understood not as an academic discipline but as a normative educational theory that unifies pedagogy , curriculum , learning theory, and the purpose of education and is grounded in specific metaphysical, epistemological, and axiological assumptions. These theories are also called educational philosophies. For example, a teacher might be said to follow a perennialist educational philosophy or to follow a perennialist philosophy of education.

    John Locke was born in 1632 in Wrington, a small village in southwestern England. His father, also named John, was a legal clerk and served with the Parliamentary forces in the English Civil War. His family was well-to-do, but not of particularly high social or economic standing. Locke spent his childhood in the West Country and as a teenager was sent to Westminster School in London.

    Locke engaged in a number of controversies during his life, including a notable one with Jonas Proast over toleration. But Locke’s most famous and philosophically important controversy was with Edward Stillingfleet, the Bishop of Worcester. Stillingfleet, in addition to being a powerful political and theological figure, was an astute and forceful critic. The two men debated a number of the positions in the Essay in a series of published letters.

    Since the 20th century professional philosophers contribute to society primarily as professors , researchers and writers. However, many of those who study philosophy in undergraduate or graduate programs contribute in the fields of law, journalism, politics, religion, science, business and various art and entertainment activities. [26]

    Traditionally, the term "philosophy" referred to any body of knowledge. [14] [27] In this sense, philosophy is closely related to religion, mathematics, natural science, education and politics. Newton''''s 1687 " Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy " is classified in the 2000s as a book of physics; he used the term " natural philosophy " because it used to encompass disciplines that later became associated with sciences such as astronomy , medicine and physics. [15]

    Hence, while in the contemporary context a central tension within philosophy of education has been between its philosophical, disciplinary aspirations and its relevance to educational policy and practice, at earlier points in its development this dichotomy would not have been recognized, either from the perspective of the philosopher or from the perspective of the educationist.

    It is during this period that we see the first codified account of the phrase philosophy of education in Paul Monroe’s Cyclopedia of Education in 1911-13 (Chambliss 1996). We see the beginnings of the argument for requiring courses in the preparation of educators that seek to promote the systematic, grounded formulation and justification of educational aims. And we see, significantly, the first professional organization dedicated to philosophical reflection on education, the John Dewey Society (JDS), in 1935.

  6. author
    bluefrog783 18 Jan 2017 02:39

    Philosophy of education can refer either to the application of philosophy to the problem of education , examining the definition, goals and meaning of education, or to any particular vision of or approach to education.

    Philosophy of education can also be understood not as an academic discipline but as a normative educational theory that unifies pedagogy , curriculum , learning theory, and the purpose of education and is grounded in specific metaphysical, epistemological, and axiological assumptions. These theories are also called educational philosophies. For example, a teacher might be said to follow a perennialist educational philosophy or to follow a perennialist philosophy of education.

    John Locke was born in 1632 in Wrington, a small village in southwestern England. His father, also named John, was a legal clerk and served with the Parliamentary forces in the English Civil War. His family was well-to-do, but not of particularly high social or economic standing. Locke spent his childhood in the West Country and as a teenager was sent to Westminster School in London.

    Locke engaged in a number of controversies during his life, including a notable one with Jonas Proast over toleration. But Locke’s most famous and philosophically important controversy was with Edward Stillingfleet, the Bishop of Worcester. Stillingfleet, in addition to being a powerful political and theological figure, was an astute and forceful critic. The two men debated a number of the positions in the Essay in a series of published letters.

    Since the 20th century professional philosophers contribute to society primarily as professors , researchers and writers. However, many of those who study philosophy in undergraduate or graduate programs contribute in the fields of law, journalism, politics, religion, science, business and various art and entertainment activities. [26]

    Traditionally, the term "philosophy" referred to any body of knowledge. [14] [27] In this sense, philosophy is closely related to religion, mathematics, natural science, education and politics. Newton''s 1687 " Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy " is classified in the 2000s as a book of physics; he used the term " natural philosophy " because it used to encompass disciplines that later became associated with sciences such as astronomy , medicine and physics. [15]

  7. author
    bigmouse859 18 Jan 2017 00:51

    Philosophy of education can refer either to the application of philosophy to the problem of education , examining the definition, goals and meaning of education, or to any particular vision of or approach to education.

    Philosophy of education can also be understood not as an academic discipline but as a normative educational theory that unifies pedagogy , curriculum , learning theory, and the purpose of education and is grounded in specific metaphysical, epistemological, and axiological assumptions. These theories are also called educational philosophies. For example, a teacher might be said to follow a perennialist educational philosophy or to follow a perennialist philosophy of education.

    John Locke was born in 1632 in Wrington, a small village in southwestern England. His father, also named John, was a legal clerk and served with the Parliamentary forces in the English Civil War. His family was well-to-do, but not of particularly high social or economic standing. Locke spent his childhood in the West Country and as a teenager was sent to Westminster School in London.

    Locke engaged in a number of controversies during his life, including a notable one with Jonas Proast over toleration. But Locke’s most famous and philosophically important controversy was with Edward Stillingfleet, the Bishop of Worcester. Stillingfleet, in addition to being a powerful political and theological figure, was an astute and forceful critic. The two men debated a number of the positions in the Essay in a series of published letters.

    Since the 20th century professional philosophers contribute to society primarily as professors , researchers and writers. However, many of those who study philosophy in undergraduate or graduate programs contribute in the fields of law, journalism, politics, religion, science, business and various art and entertainment activities. [26]

    Traditionally, the term "philosophy" referred to any body of knowledge. [14] [27] In this sense, philosophy is closely related to religion, mathematics, natural science, education and politics. Newton''''''''''''''''s 1687 " Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy " is classified in the 2000s as a book of physics; he used the term " natural philosophy " because it used to encompass disciplines that later became associated with sciences such as astronomy , medicine and physics. [15]

    Hence, while in the contemporary context a central tension within philosophy of education has been between its philosophical, disciplinary aspirations and its relevance to educational policy and practice, at earlier points in its development this dichotomy would not have been recognized, either from the perspective of the philosopher or from the perspective of the educationist.

    It is during this period that we see the first codified account of the phrase philosophy of education in Paul Monroe’s Cyclopedia of Education in 1911-13 (Chambliss 1996). We see the beginnings of the argument for requiring courses in the preparation of educators that seek to promote the systematic, grounded formulation and justification of educational aims. And we see, significantly, the first professional organization dedicated to philosophical reflection on education, the John Dewey Society (JDS), in 1935.

    We should never be ashamed to approve truth or acquire it,
    no matter what its source might be, even if it might have come
    from foreign peoples and alien nations far removed from us.
    To him who seeks the truth, no other object is higher in value.
    -- Rasa'il al-Kindi (810-873) Arab philosopher and physician 1

    As a matter of daily practice, educators formulate goals, discuss values, and set priorities. Anyone who gets involved in dealing with goals, values and priorities soon realizes that in a modern society such as ours there are many competing choices. Some are incompatible with others. Hard decisions have to be made. Here, for example, are some everyday dilemmas that educators confront: How do we treat a specific student's needs, yet deal fairly with a class of students as a whole? When, if ever, should we bend the rules? Should a teacher ever emphasize good behavior over subject skills?

  8. author
    redelephant669 18 Jan 2017 04:22

    in case you realize something in any respect approximately communism, you may understand a real communist might like Obama s plan greater suitable than a republicans, using fact they attempt for equality. It does not advise he thinks Obama is a communist. Communism isn t inherently undesirable, in basic terms no longer what we ve or choose interior the U. S.. it extremely is not approximately dictatorships. in case you examine your very own text textile, he says an era of resourceful replace is interior attain, and we finally have a representative for the human beings. I wish human beings might amplify their minds and not make illogical assumptions.

  9. author
    purplebird420 18 Jan 2017 06:19

    Philosophy of education can refer either to the application of philosophy to the problem of education , examining the definition, goals and meaning of education, or to any particular vision of or approach to education.

    Philosophy of education can also be understood not as an academic discipline but as a normative educational theory that unifies pedagogy , curriculum , learning theory, and the purpose of education and is grounded in specific metaphysical, epistemological, and axiological assumptions. These theories are also called educational philosophies. For example, a teacher might be said to follow a perennialist educational philosophy or to follow a perennialist philosophy of education.

  10. author
    Владимир Ц.Лагошин 18 Jan 2017 02:17

    Education is important because being culturally literate and knowing how to solve problems makes our lives better. There is nothing wrong with being ignorant, never having read great books, having no clue about history, not being able to find "Idaho" on a map, and thinking that "classical music" means anything before Michael Jackson. Lots of people go through their whole lives exactly that way, and they are healthy, happy, and productive. But when life ends, they will never have had the thrill of a shiver down the spine brought on by a great poem. They will not have any idea how to figure out if they are spending too much for a box of cereal because they cannot calculate the price per ounce, and they miss the satisfaction of winning out over the "system." If they watch the evening news at all, they have no idea what caused all those wars and fighting they are hearing about. Not being educated is like eating soup without a little salt and pepper. It s perfectly acceptable, but the person who does it is missing a lot.

  11. author
    beautifulduck522 18 Jan 2017 00:26

    Order essay here the value of philosophy essay on education

    Views on Philosophy and Metaphysics of Education: Albert Einstein, Jean Jacques Rousseau, Michel de Montaigne, Aristotle, Plato

  12. author
    greentiger526 18 Jan 2017 06:23

    Philosophy of education can refer either to the application of philosophy to the problem of education , examining the definition, goals and meaning of education, or to any particular vision of or approach to education.

    Philosophy of education can also be understood not as an academic discipline but as a normative educational theory that unifies pedagogy , curriculum , learning theory, and the purpose of education and is grounded in specific metaphysical, epistemological, and axiological assumptions. These theories are also called educational philosophies. For example, a teacher might be said to follow a perennialist educational philosophy or to follow a perennialist philosophy of education.

    John Locke was born in 1632 in Wrington, a small village in southwestern England. His father, also named John, was a legal clerk and served with the Parliamentary forces in the English Civil War. His family was well-to-do, but not of particularly high social or economic standing. Locke spent his childhood in the West Country and as a teenager was sent to Westminster School in London.

    Locke engaged in a number of controversies during his life, including a notable one with Jonas Proast over toleration. But Locke’s most famous and philosophically important controversy was with Edward Stillingfleet, the Bishop of Worcester. Stillingfleet, in addition to being a powerful political and theological figure, was an astute and forceful critic. The two men debated a number of the positions in the Essay in a series of published letters.

  13. author
    [email protected] 18 Jan 2017 08:34

    Philosophy of education can refer either to the application of philosophy to the problem of education , examining the definition, goals and meaning of education, or to any particular vision of or approach to education.

    Philosophy of education can also be understood not as an academic discipline but as a normative educational theory that unifies pedagogy , curriculum , learning theory, and the purpose of education and is grounded in specific metaphysical, epistemological, and axiological assumptions. These theories are also called educational philosophies. For example, a teacher might be said to follow a perennialist educational philosophy or to follow a perennialist philosophy of education.

    John Locke was born in 1632 in Wrington, a small village in southwestern England. His father, also named John, was a legal clerk and served with the Parliamentary forces in the English Civil War. His family was well-to-do, but not of particularly high social or economic standing. Locke spent his childhood in the West Country and as a teenager was sent to Westminster School in London.

    Locke engaged in a number of controversies during his life, including a notable one with Jonas Proast over toleration. But Locke’s most famous and philosophically important controversy was with Edward Stillingfleet, the Bishop of Worcester. Stillingfleet, in addition to being a powerful political and theological figure, was an astute and forceful critic. The two men debated a number of the positions in the Essay in a series of published letters.

    Since the 20th century professional philosophers contribute to society primarily as professors , researchers and writers. However, many of those who study philosophy in undergraduate or graduate programs contribute in the fields of law, journalism, politics, religion, science, business and various art and entertainment activities. [26]

    Traditionally, the term "philosophy" referred to any body of knowledge. [14] [27] In this sense, philosophy is closely related to religion, mathematics, natural science, education and politics. Newton''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s 1687 " Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy " is classified in the 2000s as a book of physics; he used the term " natural philosophy " because it used to encompass disciplines that later became associated with sciences such as astronomy , medicine and physics. [15]

    Hence, while in the contemporary context a central tension within philosophy of education has been between its philosophical, disciplinary aspirations and its relevance to educational policy and practice, at earlier points in its development this dichotomy would not have been recognized, either from the perspective of the philosopher or from the perspective of the educationist.

    It is during this period that we see the first codified account of the phrase philosophy of education in Paul Monroe’s Cyclopedia of Education in 1911-13 (Chambliss 1996). We see the beginnings of the argument for requiring courses in the preparation of educators that seek to promote the systematic, grounded formulation and justification of educational aims. And we see, significantly, the first professional organization dedicated to philosophical reflection on education, the John Dewey Society (JDS), in 1935.

    We should never be ashamed to approve truth or acquire it,
    no matter what its source might be, even if it might have come
    from foreign peoples and alien nations far removed from us.
    To him who seeks the truth, no other object is higher in value.
    -- Rasa''''''''il al-Kindi (810-873) Arab philosopher and physician 1

    As a matter of daily practice, educators formulate goals, discuss values, and set priorities. Anyone who gets involved in dealing with goals, values and priorities soon realizes that in a modern society such as ours there are many competing choices. Some are incompatible with others. Hard decisions have to be made. Here, for example, are some everyday dilemmas that educators confront: How do we treat a specific student''''''''s needs, yet deal fairly with a class of students as a whole? When, if ever, should we bend the rules? Should a teacher ever emphasize good behavior over subject skills?

    The Philosophy, Religion and Education course at Newman is for students who enjoy thinking about and debating the big questions facing individuals and society. The course will extend your understanding of religions and cultures, and engage with contemporary issues such as ethical values and the human search for identity and meaning.

    The course uses a variety of assessments to help develop a range of different skills from traditional essay and report writing to oral presentations, analysis tasks, textual commentaries, case studies, portfolios, web design, reflective logs and research projects. Assessment is by coursework and practical only - there are no written examinations.

    The term “innovative education” has been presented to scientific community by American pedagogue James Botkin about twenty years ago and received numerous and rather controversial response, for it suggested complete and irreversible revision of the principles traditional educational theories consider to be axiomatic.

    To begin with, while traditional education considers the main value of educational process to be the knowledge transferred to the student, Botkin’s innovative education presents the knowledge as a means rather than an end, at the same time orienting at the development of the student’s personality through knowledge. It is less concerned with controlling the educational process, trying to create circumstances in which the student would establish his or her own goals and achieve them, while transforming his or her own self and self-regulating the studying process.

  14. author
    SullivanVela 18 Jan 2017 08:00

  15. author
    crazyelephant648 18 Jan 2017 06:53

    Philosophy of education can refer either to the application of philosophy to the problem of education , examining the definition, goals and meaning of education, or to any particular vision of or approach to education.

    Philosophy of education can also be understood not as an academic discipline but as a normative educational theory that unifies pedagogy , curriculum , learning theory, and the purpose of education and is grounded in specific metaphysical, epistemological, and axiological assumptions. These theories are also called educational philosophies. For example, a teacher might be said to follow a perennialist educational philosophy or to follow a perennialist philosophy of education.

    John Locke was born in 1632 in Wrington, a small village in southwestern England. His father, also named John, was a legal clerk and served with the Parliamentary forces in the English Civil War. His family was well-to-do, but not of particularly high social or economic standing. Locke spent his childhood in the West Country and as a teenager was sent to Westminster School in London.

    Locke engaged in a number of controversies during his life, including a notable one with Jonas Proast over toleration. But Locke’s most famous and philosophically important controversy was with Edward Stillingfleet, the Bishop of Worcester. Stillingfleet, in addition to being a powerful political and theological figure, was an astute and forceful critic. The two men debated a number of the positions in the Essay in a series of published letters.

    Since the 20th century professional philosophers contribute to society primarily as professors , researchers and writers. However, many of those who study philosophy in undergraduate or graduate programs contribute in the fields of law, journalism, politics, religion, science, business and various art and entertainment activities. [26]

    Traditionally, the term "philosophy" referred to any body of knowledge. [14] [27] In this sense, philosophy is closely related to religion, mathematics, natural science, education and politics. Newton's 1687 " Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy " is classified in the 2000s as a book of physics; he used the term " natural philosophy " because it used to encompass disciplines that later became associated with sciences such as astronomy , medicine and physics. [15]