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The War of the Wall Summary - eNotes.com

18 Jan 2017 21:24 | Author: bigladybug116 | Category: Latin american revolution essay

Minnie Wright is accused of murdering her husband. While Minnie awaits trial, five people come to her house: the sheriff, his wife, one of Minnie's neighbors, his wife, and a county prosecutor. The men are looking for evidence to use against Minnie. The women are collecting personal effects to bring to Minnie. Both women find strange details ("trifles") that the men don't notice. A strangled canary, for instance, or an irregular quilt pattern. The men, on the other hand, are only interested in finding evidence. Seeing the trifles, the women conclude that Minnie must've been driven to murder by her abusive husband. They decide not to tell the men, however, and stay silent out of respect for Minnie's suffering.

Most critics agree that Susan Glaspell’s “A Jury of Her Peers” is, by far, her best short story. First published in Everyweek on March 5, 1917, the work is a faithful adaptation of her play Trifles , produced the year before by the Provincetown Players. Cook had decided to stage two one-act plays for the company. He already had O’Neill’s Bound East for Cardiff (wr. 1913-1914, pr. 1916, pb. 1919) but needed another, and he told Glaspell to write one. She protested because of her lack of experience as a dramatist and the pairing with O’Neill. Reaching into her past as a courthouse reporter in Iowa, she remembered covering a murder trial and her impressions of entering the kitchen of the accused. She had meant to write about the experience as a short story but had never gotten to it.

Comments
  1. author
    crazyfish152 18 Jan 2017 02:08

    Editor, teacher, writer, cultural and community worker, Toni Cade Bambara was born Miltona Mirkin Cade, on March 25, 1939 to Helen Brent Henderson Cade in New York City. Toni spent her childhood and adolescent years with her mother and brother in New York City and Jersey City, New Jersey. Deeply affected by the Black Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s, Toni’s mother encouraged her to write, and even instructed Toni’s teachers about African American history. One classmate remembers that Toni was also outspoken, and smart she graduated high school six months early.

    In 1959, Cade received her B.A. in theater arts/English from Queens College and published her first short story, “Sweet Town.” After a year in Milan, Italy, Cade returned to New York in 1962 to finish a Master’s degree in modern American fiction at New York City College, while working as a social worker, occupational therapist and director of various neighborhood projects.

    So I went out on the wharf. and looked a long time at that bare little stage. After a time the stage became a kitchen—a kitchen there all by itself. I saw just where the stove was, the table, and the steps going upstairs. Then the door at the back opened, and people all bundled up came in—two or three men, I wasn’t sure which, but sure enough about the two women, who hung back, reluctant to enter that kitchen.

    The play was a big success for Glaspell and the Provincetown Players. It is considered one of the finest short pieces written for the American theater and is frequently anthologized.

  2. author
    bigelephant958 18 Jan 2017 04:29

    I didn t go to work.I m on spring break from college , but while i was doing laundry I listened to Como LA flor- salena Yo Voy- Zion y lennox Suerte- Shakira Muneca de trapo- La orja de vamn gogh Loser- Beck How Bizzare- OMC BAila esta cumbia- Kumbia Kings Barbie Girl- Aqua The impression that I get- Mighty Mighty Bosstones Estoy aqui- shakira HaHa! It was a mix CD my friend made me.So, I guess my theme started out as Latin but kinda got infused w/ pop and Rock songs of the 90s.IDK!

  3. author
    ticklishmouse233 18 Jan 2017 03:38

    Here s a good summary http://www.enotes.com/lesson-toni-bambara Bambara challenges her characters to rethink ideas of accepted social values and norms at the same time that she challenges her readers to do the same. Many of her stories also feature a young, intelligent female narrator living in a world that she questions and examines. The narrator s discoveries, again, mirror the discovery of the reader. "The Lesson" examines the realization of economic inequity in 1960s America through the eyes of a young girl. In Sylvia, Bambara creates a proud, sensitive, tough girl who is far too smart to ignore the realities around her, even though she knows it might be easier to do so. At the same time, Bambara creates a host of characters, all of whom help Sylvia explore and demonstrate the issues that face poor people and minorities in the United States. Throughout her career, Bambara used her fiction writing as a forum for teaching people how to better their lives and how to demand more for themselves.

  4. author
    redwolf184 17 Jan 2017 23:56

    Free A Lesson Before Dying papers, essays, and research papers.

  5. author
    beautifulswan954 18 Jan 2017 05:54

    Editor, teacher, writer, cultural and community worker, Toni Cade Bambara was born Miltona Mirkin Cade, on March 25, 1939 to Helen Brent Henderson Cade in New York City. Toni spent her childhood and adolescent years with her mother and brother in New York City and Jersey City, New Jersey. Deeply affected by the Black Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s, Toni’s mother encouraged her to write, and even instructed Toni’s teachers about African American history. One classmate remembers that Toni was also outspoken, and smart she graduated high school six months early.

    In 1959, Cade received her B.A. in theater arts/English from Queens College and published her first short story, “Sweet Town.” After a year in Milan, Italy, Cade returned to New York in 1962 to finish a Master’s degree in modern American fiction at New York City College, while working as a social worker, occupational therapist and director of various neighborhood projects.

  6. author
    redlion896 18 Jan 2017 01:43

    Editor, teacher, writer, cultural and community worker, Toni Cade Bambara was born Miltona Mirkin Cade, on March 25, 1939 to Helen Brent Henderson Cade in New York City. Toni spent her childhood and adolescent years with her mother and brother in New York City and Jersey City, New Jersey. Deeply affected by the Black Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s, Toni’s mother encouraged her to write, and even instructed Toni’s teachers about African American history. One classmate remembers that Toni was also outspoken, and smart she graduated high school six months early.

    In 1959, Cade received her B.A. in theater arts/English from Queens College and published her first short story, “Sweet Town.” After a year in Milan, Italy, Cade returned to New York in 1962 to finish a Master’s degree in modern American fiction at New York City College, while working as a social worker, occupational therapist and director of various neighborhood projects.

    So I went out on the wharf. and looked a long time at that bare little stage. After a time the stage became a kitchen—a kitchen there all by itself. I saw just where the stove was, the table, and the steps going upstairs. Then the door at the back opened, and people all bundled up came in—two or three men, I wasn’t sure which, but sure enough about the two women, who hung back, reluctant to enter that kitchen.

    The play was a big success for Glaspell and the Provincetown Players. It is considered one of the finest short pieces written for the American theater and is frequently anthologized.

    Five of the children’s friends – Flyboy, Junebug, Big Butt, Mercedes and Rosie Giraffe - join them on their trip. Miss Moore takes them in a taxi to Fifth Avenue, where they marvel at the wealthy people. The children see a microscope in the window of F.A.O. Schwarz, and clamor for it. They notice an expensive paperweight there, and Miss Moore tries to explain the importance of keeping a tidy work area. Next, the children see a fiberglass sailboat that costs $1,195. They speculate about what could justify such an exorbitant cost, when their own toy sailboats cost less than a dollar.

    Miss Moore urges them to go inside the toystore. Sylvia immediately feels uncomfortable there, and remembers a time that she and Sugar planned to run into a Catholic church and make noise. When they got inside, the atmosphere was so holy that they could not go through with it. Sylvia feels annoyed that Miss Moore interrupted their day to bring them here, but consoles herself by keeping the change from the five dollars Miss Moore gave her to pay for the taxi. Miss Moore seems to notice that Sylvia is angry.

    The narrator (unnamed) and her cousin Cathy are playing at their Granny ’s house along with Terry and Tyrone , the twin boys from next door. The house is out in the country, sitting next to fields of crops.

    A camera crew has been lurking in a nearby meadow for some time, and Granny eventually tells the kids to shoo them away. The cameramen explain that they are shooting a film to promote the county’s food stamps program, and would like to get some footage of her house. Granny refuses.

  7. author
    greenmeercat207 18 Jan 2017 08:55

    The Lesson Toni Cade Bambara

  8. author
    orangemouse914 18 Jan 2017 05:24

    Editor, teacher, writer, cultural and community worker, Toni Cade Bambara was born Miltona Mirkin Cade, on March 25, 1939 to Helen Brent Henderson Cade in New York City. Toni spent her childhood and adolescent years with her mother and brother in New York City and Jersey City, New Jersey. Deeply affected by the Black Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s, Toni’s mother encouraged her to write, and even instructed Toni’s teachers about African American history. One classmate remembers that Toni was also outspoken, and smart she graduated high school six months early.

    In 1959, Cade received her B.A. in theater arts/English from Queens College and published her first short story, “Sweet Town.” After a year in Milan, Italy, Cade returned to New York in 1962 to finish a Master’s degree in modern American fiction at New York City College, while working as a social worker, occupational therapist and director of various neighborhood projects.

    So I went out on the wharf... and looked a long time at that bare little stage. After a time the stage became a kitchen—a kitchen there all by itself. I saw just where the stove was, the table, and the steps going upstairs. Then the door at the back opened, and people all bundled up came in—two or three men, I wasn’t sure which, but sure enough about the two women, who hung back, reluctant to enter that kitchen.

    The play was a big success for Glaspell and the Provincetown Players. It is considered one of the finest short pieces written for the American theater and is frequently anthologized.

  9. author
    Бобинка 18 Jan 2017 08:53

    Click here the lesson by toni cade bambara essay

    Minnie Wright is accused of murdering her husband. While Minnie awaits trial, five people come to her house: the sheriff, his wife, one of Minnie''s neighbors, his wife, and a county prosecutor. The men are looking for evidence to use against Minnie. The women are collecting personal effects to bring to Minnie. Both women find strange details ("trifles") that the men don''t notice. A strangled canary, for instance, or an irregular quilt pattern. The men, on the other hand, are only interested in finding evidence. Seeing the trifles, the women conclude that Minnie must''ve been driven to murder by her abusive husband. They decide not to tell the men, however, and stay silent out of respect for Minnie''s suffering.

    Most critics agree that Susan Glaspell’s “A Jury of Her Peers” is, by far, her best short story. First published in Everyweek on March 5, 1917, the work is a faithful adaptation of her play Trifles , produced the year before by the Provincetown Players. Cook had decided to stage two one-act plays for the company. He already had O’Neill’s Bound East for Cardiff (wr. 1913-1914, pr. 1916, pb. 1919) but needed another, and he told Glaspell to write one. She protested because of her lack of experience as a dramatist and the pairing with O’Neill. Reaching into her past as a courthouse reporter in Iowa, she remembered covering a murder trial and her impressions of entering the kitchen of the accused. She had meant to write about the experience as a short story but had never gotten to it.

  10. author
    К А Р Л А 18 Jan 2017 04:31

    Editor, teacher, writer, cultural and community worker, Toni Cade Bambara was born Miltona Mirkin Cade, on March 25, 1939 to Helen Brent Henderson Cade in New York City. Toni spent her childhood and adolescent years with her mother and brother in New York City and Jersey City, New Jersey. Deeply affected by the Black Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s, Toni’s mother encouraged her to write, and even instructed Toni’s teachers about African American history. One classmate remembers that Toni was also outspoken, and smart she graduated high school six months early.

    In 1959, Cade received her B.A. in theater arts/English from Queens College and published her first short story, “Sweet Town.” After a year in Milan, Italy, Cade returned to New York in 1962 to finish a Master’s degree in modern American fiction at New York City College, while working as a social worker, occupational therapist and director of various neighborhood projects.

    So I went out on the wharf. and looked a long time at that bare little stage. After a time the stage became a kitchen—a kitchen there all by itself. I saw just where the stove was, the table, and the steps going upstairs. Then the door at the back opened, and people all bundled up came in—two or three men, I wasn’t sure which, but sure enough about the two women, who hung back, reluctant to enter that kitchen.

    The play was a big success for Glaspell and the Provincetown Players. It is considered one of the finest short pieces written for the American theater and is frequently anthologized.

    Five of the children’s friends – Flyboy, Junebug, Big Butt, Mercedes and Rosie Giraffe - join them on their trip. Miss Moore takes them in a taxi to Fifth Avenue, where they marvel at the wealthy people. The children see a microscope in the window of F.A.O. Schwarz, and clamor for it. They notice an expensive paperweight there, and Miss Moore tries to explain the importance of keeping a tidy work area. Next, the children see a fiberglass sailboat that costs $1,195. They speculate about what could justify such an exorbitant cost, when their own toy sailboats cost less than a dollar.

    Miss Moore urges them to go inside the toystore. Sylvia immediately feels uncomfortable there, and remembers a time that she and Sugar planned to run into a Catholic church and make noise. When they got inside, the atmosphere was so holy that they could not go through with it. Sylvia feels annoyed that Miss Moore interrupted their day to bring them here, but consoles herself by keeping the change from the five dollars Miss Moore gave her to pay for the taxi. Miss Moore seems to notice that Sylvia is angry.