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Homer: The Iliad and The Odyssey (opening lines)

18 Jan 2017 21:24 | Author: ф u ▲ л k ▲ | Category: Bodycare business plan

Iliad · Epic Cycle · Aeneid, Book 2 · Iphigenia in Aulis · Philoctetes · Ajax · The Trojan Women · Posthomerica See also: Trojan War in popular culture

Comments
  1. author
    bigbear250 18 Jan 2017 02:28

    Setting: Troy (modern Hisarlik , Turkey )
    Period: Bronze Age
    Traditional dating: c. 1194–1184 BC
    Modern dating: c. 1260–1180 BC
    Outcome: Greek victory, destruction of Troy
    See also: Historicity of the Iliad

    Iliad · Epic Cycle · Aeneid , Book 2 ·
    Iphigenia in Aulis · Philoctetes ·
    Ajax · The Trojan Women · Posthomerica
    See also: Trojan War in popular culture

    With Achilles out of the way, Hector , champion of the Trojans, drives the Achaeans back to their beached ships. The Achaeans build fortifications, but at the urging of the chieftains Agamemnon sends and embassy to ask Achilles to return to battle. Agamemnon offers rich prizes, but Achilles refuses the offer and remains withdrawn from battle.

    Iliad study guide contains a biography of Homer, literature essays, a complete e-text, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis.

  2. author
    beautifulduck546 17 Jan 2017 22:40

    Some links for inspiration > "One of the most epic examples of aristeia is in Book 21 of the Iliad when Achilles almost single handedly routs the Trojan army. This includes his chase of Hector around Troy; Achilles eventually succeeds in killing him and dragging his corpse around the city." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aristeia "..called aristeia "a battlefield rage." He used the death of Achilles best friend Patroclus in the Iliad as an example of Achilles aristeia." "(Achilles) moves into the battlefield rage; he operates in a way that would be totally unthinkable in other human context," http://www.atrium-media.com/rogueclassicism/Posts/00003550.html More examples > http://www.wordnik.com/words/aristeia/examples Achilles aristeia similar to and different from others http://pages.cabrini.edu/jzurek/Homer/iliad05.htm

  3. author
    organicleopard738 17 Jan 2017 22:36

    Setting: Troy (modern Hisarlik , Turkey )
    Period: Bronze Age
    Traditional dating: c. 1194–1184 BC
    Modern dating: c. 1260–1180 BC
    Outcome: Greek victory, destruction of Troy
    See also: Historicity of the Iliad

    Iliad · Epic Cycle · Aeneid , Book 2 ·
    Iphigenia in Aulis · Philoctetes ·
    Ajax · The Trojan Women · Posthomerica
    See also: Trojan War in popular culture

    With Achilles out of the way, Hector , champion of the Trojans, drives the Achaeans back to their beached ships. The Achaeans build fortifications, but at the urging of the chieftains Agamemnon sends and embassy to ask Achilles to return to battle. Agamemnon offers rich prizes, but Achilles refuses the offer and remains withdrawn from battle.

    Iliad study guide contains a biography of Homer, literature essays, a complete e-text, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis.

    Because of this dishonor, anger seizes Achilles and he strides toward Agamemnon to kill him. Hera sends the goddess Athena to stop him. Only Achilles can see Athena, who tells him not to kill the king. She promises that Achilles will be justly compensated for this great dishonor. Achilles obeys her, but he vows to Agamemnon that one day the Achaeans will come begging Achilles for help. They will need his protection from Hector , the greatest of the Trojan warriors, and Agamemnon will regret his pride.

    Nestor , oldest of the Achaean kings, rises and tells the two men that they must listen to him, because he is old and has lived and fought with warriors greater than any now living. He asks Agamemnon not to take Briseis, Achilles fairly won prize, and he tells Achilles that he must respect Agamemnon s position as commander-in-chief.

    Cut and paste the following html for use in a web report. This format will link back to this page, which may be useful but may not be required.

    The incident with the Phaiákians did, however, highlight Poseidon's jealous nature again. He said to his brother, Zeus, of the Phaiákian ship that had returned Odysseus to Ithaca, "Let me impale her, end her voyage, and end all ocean-crossing with her passengers, then heave a mass of mountain in a ring around the city" (364). Poseidon planned to destroy the ship and surround the sea-faring people with mountains. His anger towards them was not only because they helped Odysseus, his enemy, but because they were too confident in their ability to cross the seas, his realm (Gantz 63).

    Odysseus had a less costly encounter with Tyro, mother of Poseidon's sons Pelias and Nelius. He spoke with her spirit in the underworld and she told him how Poseidon had tricked her by assuming the shape of her lover Enipeus in order to lay with her. After they had done so, he revealed himself as Poseidon and she became pregnant with his twin sons (Homer Odyssey 337). Nelius would go on to become the father of Nestor, who served as a mentor to the Achaean soldiers, including Odysseus.

  4. author
    beautifulduck632 18 Jan 2017 04:46

    The Iliad. Book XXII. The Death of Hector. Translations from Homer. Alexander Pope. 1903. Complete Poetical Works

  5. author
    Životinja Apokalipsa 18 Jan 2017 00:56

    Setting: Troy (modern Hisarlik , Turkey )
    Period: Bronze Age
    Traditional dating: c. 1194–1184 BC
    Modern dating: c. 1260–1180 BC
    Outcome: Greek victory, destruction of Troy
    See also: Historicity of the Iliad

    Iliad · Epic Cycle · Aeneid , Book 2 ·
    Iphigenia in Aulis · Philoctetes ·
    Ajax · The Trojan Women · Posthomerica
    See also: Trojan War in popular culture

  6. author
    crazyleopard901 18 Jan 2017 09:23

    The Power of Cunning over Strength If the Iliad is about strength, the Odyssey is about cunning, a difference that becomes apparent in the very first lines of the epics. Whereas the Iliad tells the story of the rage of Achilles, the strongest hero in the Greek army, the Odyssey focuses on a “man of twists and turns” (1.1). Odysseus does have extraordinary strength, as he demonstrates in Book 21 by being the only man who can string the bow. But he relies much more on mind than muscle, a tendency that his encounters showcase. He knows that he cannot overpower Polyphemus, for example, and that, even if he were able to do so, he wouldn t be able to budge the boulder from the door. He thus schemes around his disadvantage in strength by exploiting Po1yphemus s stupidity. Though he does use violence to put out Polyphemus s single eye, this display of strength is part of a larger plan to deceive the brute. Similarly, Odysseus knows that he is no match for the host of strapping young suitors in his palace, so he makes the most of his other strength—his wits. Step by step, through disguises and deceptions, he arranges a situation in which he alone is armed and the suitors are locked in a room with him. With this setup, Achilles superb talents as a warrior would enable him to accomplish what Odysseus does, but only Odysseus s strategic planning can bring about such a sure victory. Some of the tests in Odysseus s long, wandering ordeal seem to mock reliance on strength alone. No one can resist the Sirens song, for example, but Odysseus gets an earful of the lovely melody by having his crew tie him up. Scylla and Charybdis cannot be beaten, but Odysseus can minimize his losses with prudent decision-making and careful navigation. Odysseus s encounter with Achilles in the underworld is a reminder: Achilles won great kleos, or glory, during his life, but that life was brief and ended violently. Odysseus, on the other hand, by virtue of his wits, will live to a ripe old age and is destined to die in peace. The Pitfalls of Temptation The initial act that frustrated so many Achaeans homecoming was the work of an Achaean himself: Ajax (the “Lesser” Ajax, a relatively unimportant figure not to be confused with the “Greater” Ajax, whom Odysseus meets in Hades) raped the Trojan priestess Cassandra in a temple while the Greeks were plundering the fallen city. That act of impulse, impiety, and stupidity brought the wrath of Athena upon the Achaean fleet and set in motion the chain of events that turned Odysseus s homecoming into a long nightmare. It is fit that the Odyssey is motivated by such an event, for many of the pitfalls that Odysseus and his men face are likewise obstacles that arise out of mortal weakness and the inability to control it. The submission to temptation or recklessness either angers the gods or distracts Odysseus and the members of his crew from their journey: they yield to hunger and slaughter the Sun s flocks, and they eat the fruit of the lotus and forget about their homes. Even Odysseus s hunger for kleos is a kind of temptation. He submits to it when he reveals his name to Polyphemus, bringing Poseidon s wrath upon him and his men. In the case of the Sirens, the theme is revisited simply for its own interest. With their ears plugged, the crew members sail safely by the Sirens island, while Odysseus, longing to hear the Sirens sweet song, is saved from folly only by his foresighted command to his crew to keep him bound to the ship s mast. Homer is fascinated with depicting his protagonist tormented by temptation: in general, Odysseus and his men want very desperately to complete their nostos, or homecoming, but this desire is constantly at odds with the other pleasures that the world offers.

  7. author
    Ефим Фёдоров 18 Jan 2017 06:17

    Setting: Troy (modern Hisarlik , Turkey )
    Period: Bronze Age
    Traditional dating: c. 1194–1184 BC
    Modern dating: c. 1260–1180 BC
    Outcome: Greek victory, destruction of Troy
    See also: Historicity of the Iliad

    Iliad · Epic Cycle · Aeneid , Book 2 ·
    Iphigenia in Aulis · Philoctetes ·
    Ajax · The Trojan Women · Posthomerica
    See also: Trojan War in popular culture

    With Achilles out of the way, Hector , champion of the Trojans, drives the Achaeans back to their beached ships. The Achaeans build fortifications, but at the urging of the chieftains Agamemnon sends and embassy to ask Achilles to return to battle. Agamemnon offers rich prizes, but Achilles refuses the offer and remains withdrawn from battle.

    Iliad study guide contains a biography of Homer, literature essays, a complete e-text, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis.

    Because of this dishonor, anger seizes Achilles and he strides toward Agamemnon to kill him. Hera sends the goddess Athena to stop him. Only Achilles can see Athena, who tells him not to kill the king. She promises that Achilles will be justly compensated for this great dishonor. Achilles obeys her, but he vows to Agamemnon that one day the Achaeans will come begging Achilles for help. They will need his protection from Hector , the greatest of the Trojan warriors, and Agamemnon will regret his pride.

    Nestor , oldest of the Achaean kings, rises and tells the two men that they must listen to him, because he is old and has lived and fought with warriors greater than any now living. He asks Agamemnon not to take Briseis, Achilles fairly won prize, and he tells Achilles that he must respect Agamemnon s position as commander-in-chief.

    Cut and paste the following html for use in a web report. This format will link back to this page, which may be useful but may not be required.

    The incident with the Phaiákians did, however, highlight Poseidon''s jealous nature again. He said to his brother, Zeus, of the Phaiákian ship that had returned Odysseus to Ithaca, "Let me impale her, end her voyage, and end all ocean-crossing with her passengers, then heave a mass of mountain in a ring around the city" (364). Poseidon planned to destroy the ship and surround the sea-faring people with mountains. His anger towards them was not only because they helped Odysseus, his enemy, but because they were too confident in their ability to cross the seas, his realm (Gantz 63).

    Odysseus had a less costly encounter with Tyro, mother of Poseidon''s sons Pelias and Nelius. He spoke with her spirit in the underworld and she told him how Poseidon had tricked her by assuming the shape of her lover Enipeus in order to lay with her. After they had done so, he revealed himself as Poseidon and she became pregnant with his twin sons (Homer Odyssey 337). Nelius would go on to become the father of Nestor, who served as a mentor to the Achaean soldiers, including Odysseus.

  8. author
    bluesnake976 18 Jan 2017 05:00

    Setting: Troy (modern Hisarlik , Turkey )
    Period: Bronze Age
    Traditional dating: c. 1194–1184 BC
    Modern dating: c. 1260–1180 BC
    Outcome: Greek victory, destruction of Troy
    See also: Historicity of the Iliad

    Iliad · Epic Cycle · Aeneid , Book 2 ·
    Iphigenia in Aulis · Philoctetes ·
    Ajax · The Trojan Women · Posthomerica
    See also: Trojan War in popular culture

    With Achilles out of the way, Hector , champion of the Trojans, drives the Achaeans back to their beached ships. The Achaeans build fortifications, but at the urging of the chieftains Agamemnon sends and embassy to ask Achilles to return to battle. Agamemnon offers rich prizes, but Achilles refuses the offer and remains withdrawn from battle.

    Iliad study guide contains a biography of Homer, literature essays, a complete e-text, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis.

    Because of this dishonor, anger seizes Achilles and he strides toward Agamemnon to kill him. Hera sends the goddess Athena to stop him. Only Achilles can see Athena, who tells him not to kill the king. She promises that Achilles will be justly compensated for this great dishonor. Achilles obeys her, but he vows to Agamemnon that one day the Achaeans will come begging Achilles for help. They will need his protection from Hector , the greatest of the Trojan warriors, and Agamemnon will regret his pride.

    Nestor , oldest of the Achaean kings, rises and tells the two men that they must listen to him, because he is old and has lived and fought with warriors greater than any now living. He asks Agamemnon not to take Briseis, Achilles fairly won prize, and he tells Achilles that he must respect Agamemnon s position as commander-in-chief.

  9. author
    blacktiger824 18 Jan 2017 03:20

    Wow - I think I d would have had to be there for the class discussions to elaborate on this one.. The Odyssey is easy - it is the contrast between the journey/exile and the homecoming. For every adventure Odysseus encounters (and behaves with emotion or hubris) there is a contrasting section of him homecoming when he is a careful and deliberate planner. Odysseus matures & grows over the course of the poem. The Iliad is harder - many would say it is the contrast between the Glory that is War (the cult of the Greek Hero) and the brutal reality of war. The goriness of battle and premature death vs. the glorification of the Heroes. Read this great essay.. The balance within the Hero and Homeric Culture. The poem is about the "rage" of Achilles and that general acceptance that he is without doubt the greatest Greek Hero. And yet he still fails at points to be that Hero by his temper/emotions, etc. I really liked this essay -- Hope it helps http://www.cliffsnotes.com/WileyCDA/LitNote/id-26,pageNum-90.html

  10. author
    smalllion961 18 Jan 2017 09:33

  11. author
    goldenfrog484 18 Jan 2017 04:52

    Setting: Troy (modern Hisarlik , Turkey )
    Period: Bronze Age
    Traditional dating: c. 1194–1184 BC
    Modern dating: c. 1260–1180 BC
    Outcome: Greek victory, destruction of Troy
    See also: Historicity of the Iliad

    Iliad · Epic Cycle · Aeneid , Book 2 ·
    Iphigenia in Aulis · Philoctetes ·
    Ajax · The Trojan Women · Posthomerica
    See also: Trojan War in popular culture

    With Achilles out of the way, Hector , champion of the Trojans, drives the Achaeans back to their beached ships. The Achaeans build fortifications, but at the urging of the chieftains Agamemnon sends and embassy to ask Achilles to return to battle. Agamemnon offers rich prizes, but Achilles refuses the offer and remains withdrawn from battle.

    Iliad study guide contains a biography of Homer, literature essays, a complete e-text, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis.

    Because of this dishonor, anger seizes Achilles and he strides toward Agamemnon to kill him. Hera sends the goddess Athena to stop him. Only Achilles can see Athena, who tells him not to kill the king. She promises that Achilles will be justly compensated for this great dishonor. Achilles obeys her, but he vows to Agamemnon that one day the Achaeans will come begging Achilles for help. They will need his protection from Hector , the greatest of the Trojan warriors, and Agamemnon will regret his pride.

    Nestor , oldest of the Achaean kings, rises and tells the two men that they must listen to him, because he is old and has lived and fought with warriors greater than any now living. He asks Agamemnon not to take Briseis, Achilles fairly won prize, and he tells Achilles that he must respect Agamemnon s position as commander-in-chief.

    Cut and paste the following html for use in a web report. This format will link back to this page, which may be useful but may not be required.

  12. author
     ❗️ ❌ten5Dasha ❌ ❗️ 18 Jan 2017 05:21

    Setting: Troy (modern Hisarlik , Turkey )
    Period: Bronze Age
    Traditional dating: c. 1194–1184 BC
    Modern dating: c. 1260–1180 BC
    Outcome: Greek victory, destruction of Troy
    See also: Historicity of the Iliad

    Iliad · Epic Cycle · Aeneid , Book 2 ·
    Iphigenia in Aulis · Philoctetes ·
    Ajax · The Trojan Women · Posthomerica
    See also: Trojan War in popular culture

    With Achilles out of the way, Hector , champion of the Trojans, drives the Achaeans back to their beached ships. The Achaeans build fortifications, but at the urging of the chieftains Agamemnon sends and embassy to ask Achilles to return to battle. Agamemnon offers rich prizes, but Achilles refuses the offer and remains withdrawn from battle.

    Iliad study guide contains a biography of Homer, literature essays, a complete e-text, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis.

    Because of this dishonor, anger seizes Achilles and he strides toward Agamemnon to kill him. Hera sends the goddess Athena to stop him. Only Achilles can see Athena, who tells him not to kill the king. She promises that Achilles will be justly compensated for this great dishonor. Achilles obeys her, but he vows to Agamemnon that one day the Achaeans will come begging Achilles for help. They will need his protection from Hector , the greatest of the Trojan warriors, and Agamemnon will regret his pride.

    Nestor , oldest of the Achaean kings, rises and tells the two men that they must listen to him, because he is old and has lived and fought with warriors greater than any now living. He asks Agamemnon not to take Briseis, Achilles fairly won prize, and he tells Achilles that he must respect Agamemnon s position as commander-in-chief.

    Cut and paste the following html for use in a web report. This format will link back to this page, which may be useful but may not be required.

    The incident with the Phaiákians did, however, highlight Poseidon''''s jealous nature again. He said to his brother, Zeus, of the Phaiákian ship that had returned Odysseus to Ithaca, "Let me impale her, end her voyage, and end all ocean-crossing with her passengers, then heave a mass of mountain in a ring around the city" (364). Poseidon planned to destroy the ship and surround the sea-faring people with mountains. His anger towards them was not only because they helped Odysseus, his enemy, but because they were too confident in their ability to cross the seas, his realm (Gantz 63).

    Odysseus had a less costly encounter with Tyro, mother of Poseidon''''s sons Pelias and Nelius. He spoke with her spirit in the underworld and she told him how Poseidon had tricked her by assuming the shape of her lover Enipeus in order to lay with her. After they had done so, he revealed himself as Poseidon and she became pregnant with his twin sons (Homer Odyssey 337). Nelius would go on to become the father of Nestor, who served as a mentor to the Achaean soldiers, including Odysseus.

    In Greek mythology , the Shirt of Nessus , Tunic of Nessus , Nessus-robe , or Nessus' shirt was the poisoned shirt that killed Heracles. It was once a popular reference in literature. In folkloristics , it is considered an instance of the " poison dress " motif. [1]

    In Greek mythology, it is the shirt ( chiton ) daubed with the tainted blood of the centaur Nessus that Deianeira , Heracles' wife, naïvely gave Heracles, burning him, and driving him to throw himself onto a funeral pyre.