14

99% Invisible

18 Jan 2017 21:24 | Author: Э.Очхүү | Category: Methodology of an analysis research paper

The Civil War lasted between 1861 and 1865 and it resulted to more than 618,000 casualties. However, the causes of Civil War can be traced back to tensions that were created early in the history of the nation. Mainly, the war between the sates was caused by social and economic differences between the South and the North, federal rights versus the state, the differences between slave and non-slave state proponents, growth of the abolition movement, and the election of Abraham Lincoln (Calore 2008, 5).

In accordance with Calore (2008) cotton became very profitable in 1793 following the invention of the cotton gin by Eli Whitney. As a matter of fact, this machine greatly minimised the time used to separate seeds from cotton. Nevertheless, the number of plantation farmers willing to move from growing other crops to growing cotton increased leading to increased demand for large amount of cheap labor (slaves). Therefore, the economy of the south became a single crop economy that depended mainly on cotton and thus increased dependence on slavery (8).

Comments
  1. author
    yellowwolf683 17 Jan 2017 22:20

    Today in History : Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

    • 55TH ANNUAL BARONDESS/LINCOLN AWARD PRESENTATION
    • 1842 Civil War Restored Vintage Brick Farm House For Sale
    • Honor Answering Honor: “Bloody Chamberlain” and the Surrender at Appomattox
    • National Museum of the United States Army Spotlight: Outbreak of War Exhibit
    • Available now: 2016 Mort Kunstler Collectible Ornament "The Winds of Winter"
    • 4 Star General Takes Polar Bear Plunge in WWII
    • The Civil War Round Table of New York Presenting Peter Cozzens

    Abraham Lincoln †
    Ulysses S. Grant
    William T. Sherman
    David Farragut
    George B. McClellan
    George Meade
    John Pope

    Jefferson Davis
    Robert E. Lee
    P.G.T. Beauregard
    Stonewall Jackson + †
    Nathan B. Forrest
    Joseph E. Johnston

  2. author
    bluepanda489 18 Jan 2017 07:02

    Today in History : Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

    • 55TH ANNUAL BARONDESS/LINCOLN AWARD PRESENTATION
    • 1842 Civil War Restored Vintage Brick Farm House For Sale
    • Honor Answering Honor: “Bloody Chamberlain” and the Surrender at Appomattox
    • National Museum of the United States Army Spotlight: Outbreak of War Exhibit
    • Available now: 2016 Mort Kunstler Collectible Ornament "The Winds of Winter"
    • 4 Star General Takes Polar Bear Plunge in WWII
    • The Civil War Round Table of New York Presenting Peter Cozzens

    Abraham Lincoln †
    Ulysses S. Grant
    William T. Sherman
    David Farragut
    George B. McClellan
    George Meade
    John Pope

    Jefferson Davis
    Robert E. Lee
    P.G.T. Beauregard
    Stonewall Jackson + †
    Nathan B. Forrest
    Joseph E. Johnston

    Join us to save 243 acres at four battlefields in Virginia and West Virginia — and take advantage of a $14.96-to-$1 match.

    Get your stunning calendar — commemorating the 30th anniversary of the Civil War Trust and featuring beautiful battlefield photos—for just $12.95.

    In the course of our conversation, Yacine Kout mentioned something else—an incident that had happened the previous spring at Eastern Randolph High School just outside Asheboro. On Cinco de Mayo, the annual celebration of Mexico’s defeat of French forces at the Battle of Puebla in 1862, a lot of Hispanic students brought Mexican flags to school. The next day, Kout said, white students brought Confederate flags to school as a message: This is our heritage.

    But an equally important reason was a vigorous, sustained effort by Southerners to literally rewrite history—and among the most ardent revisionists were a group of respectable white Southern matrons known as the United Daughters of the Confederacy.

  3. author
    beautifulswan891 18 Jan 2017 08:18

    honestly, i know nothing about it!

  4. author
    bluepeacock447 17 Jan 2017 22:11

    Today in History : Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

    • 55TH ANNUAL BARONDESS/LINCOLN AWARD PRESENTATION
    • 1842 Civil War Restored Vintage Brick Farm House For Sale
    • Honor Answering Honor: “Bloody Chamberlain” and the Surrender at Appomattox
    • National Museum of the United States Army Spotlight: Outbreak of War Exhibit
    • Available now: 2016 Mort Kunstler Collectible Ornament "The Winds of Winter"
    • 4 Star General Takes Polar Bear Plunge in WWII
    • The Civil War Round Table of New York Presenting Peter Cozzens

  5. author
    Илья Ковалёв 18 Jan 2017 02:03

    Today in History : Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

    • 55TH ANNUAL BARONDESS/LINCOLN AWARD PRESENTATION
    • 1842 Civil War Restored Vintage Brick Farm House For Sale
    • Honor Answering Honor: “Bloody Chamberlain” and the Surrender at Appomattox
    • National Museum of the United States Army Spotlight: Outbreak of War Exhibit
    • Available now: 2016 Mort Kunstler Collectible Ornament "The Winds of Winter"
    • 4 Star General Takes Polar Bear Plunge in WWII
    • The Civil War Round Table of New York Presenting Peter Cozzens

    Abraham Lincoln †
    Ulysses S. Grant
    William T. Sherman
    David Farragut
    George B. McClellan
    George Meade
    John Pope

    Jefferson Davis
    Robert E. Lee
    P.G.T. Beauregard
    Stonewall Jackson + †
    Nathan B. Forrest
    Joseph E. Johnston

    Join us to save 243 acres at four battlefields in Virginia and West Virginia — and take advantage of a $14.96-to-$1 match.

    Get your stunning calendar — commemorating the 30th anniversary of the Civil War Trust and featuring beautiful battlefield photos—for just $12.95.

    In the course of our conversation, Yacine Kout mentioned something else—an incident that had happened the previous spring at Eastern Randolph High School just outside Asheboro. On Cinco de Mayo, the annual celebration of Mexico’s defeat of French forces at the Battle of Puebla in 1862, a lot of Hispanic students brought Mexican flags to school. The next day, Kout said, white students brought Confederate flags to school as a message: This is our heritage.

    But an equally important reason was a vigorous, sustained effort by Southerners to literally rewrite history—and among the most ardent revisionists were a group of respectable white Southern matrons known as the United Daughters of the Confederacy.

    Roy F. Nichols , The Disruption of American Democracy , 1948.
    Kenneth M. Stampp , And War Came , 1950.
    Eric Foner , Free Soil, Free Labor, Free Men , 1970.
    William L. Barney , The Road to Secession , 1972.
    Michael F. Holt , The Political Crisis of the 1850s , 1973.
    David M. Potter , The Impending Crisis, 1848–1861 , 1976.
    J. Mills Thornton III , Politics and Power in a Slave Society , 1978.
    Daniel W. Crofts , Reluctant Confederates , 1989.
    Bruce Levine , Half Slave and Half Free , 1992.

    Northern leaders, particularly Abraham Lincoln and Seward, were absolutely committed to the preservation of the Union and also understood that the European reaction to the American crisis was critical. Seward, especially, believed that secession lacked majority support in the South and that Southern Unionists would rise and end the secession movement by the spring of 1861. It was essential that the Southern extremists receive no encouragement from abroad, without which expectation, Seward believed, the Confederacy would be short-lived.

    The Civil War , the award-winning film produced and directed by Ken Burns, was rebroadcast as a newly restored, high-definition version in September of 2015. The 2015 rebroadcast coincided with the 25th anniversary of the series’ initial broadcast in September 1990, and presented the film for the first time in the same fidelity and framing as the negative that Ken Burns and his co-cinematographers Allen Moore and Buddy Squires shot more than 25 years ago.

    Funding for the 25th Anniversary presentation of The Civil War was provided by Bank of America, The Corporation for Public Broadcasting and PBS.

    The Civil War was the first war that was widely photographed. Many American Civil War Images, Pictures and Photos have survived.

    The battlefields of the Civil War cross the nation, and made famous many previously unknown towns, crossroads and farms like Antietam Creek, Shiloh and Gettysburg.

  6. author
    bluepanda489 18 Jan 2017 07:02

    Today in History : Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

    • 55TH ANNUAL BARONDESS/LINCOLN AWARD PRESENTATION
    • 1842 Civil War Restored Vintage Brick Farm House For Sale
    • Honor Answering Honor: “Bloody Chamberlain” and the Surrender at Appomattox
    • National Museum of the United States Army Spotlight: Outbreak of War Exhibit
    • Available now: 2016 Mort Kunstler Collectible Ornament "The Winds of Winter"
    • 4 Star General Takes Polar Bear Plunge in WWII
    • The Civil War Round Table of New York Presenting Peter Cozzens

    Abraham Lincoln †
    Ulysses S. Grant
    William T. Sherman
    David Farragut
    George B. McClellan
    George Meade
    John Pope

    Jefferson Davis
    Robert E. Lee
    P.G.T. Beauregard
    Stonewall Jackson + †
    Nathan B. Forrest
    Joseph E. Johnston

    Join us to save 243 acres at four battlefields in Virginia and West Virginia — and take advantage of a $14.96-to-$1 match.

    Get your stunning calendar — commemorating the 30th anniversary of the Civil War Trust and featuring beautiful battlefield photos—for just $12.95.

    In the course of our conversation, Yacine Kout mentioned something else—an incident that had happened the previous spring at Eastern Randolph High School just outside Asheboro. On Cinco de Mayo, the annual celebration of Mexico’s defeat of French forces at the Battle of Puebla in 1862, a lot of Hispanic students brought Mexican flags to school. The next day, Kout said, white students brought Confederate flags to school as a message: This is our heritage.

    But an equally important reason was a vigorous, sustained effort by Southerners to literally rewrite history—and among the most ardent revisionists were a group of respectable white Southern matrons known as the United Daughters of the Confederacy.

    Roy F. Nichols , The Disruption of American Democracy , 1948.
    Kenneth M. Stampp , And War Came , 1950.
    Eric Foner , Free Soil, Free Labor, Free Men , 1970.
    William L. Barney , The Road to Secession , 1972.
    Michael F. Holt , The Political Crisis of the 1850s , 1973.
    David M. Potter , The Impending Crisis, 1848–1861 , 1976.
    J. Mills Thornton III , Politics and Power in a Slave Society , 1978.
    Daniel W. Crofts , Reluctant Confederates , 1989.
    Bruce Levine , Half Slave and Half Free , 1992.

    Northern leaders, particularly Abraham Lincoln and Seward, were absolutely committed to the preservation of the Union and also understood that the European reaction to the American crisis was critical. Seward, especially, believed that secession lacked majority support in the South and that Southern Unionists would rise and end the secession movement by the spring of 1861. It was essential that the Southern extremists receive no encouragement from abroad, without which expectation, Seward believed, the Confederacy would be short-lived.

    The Civil War , the award-winning film produced and directed by Ken Burns, was rebroadcast as a newly restored, high-definition version in September of 2015. The 2015 rebroadcast coincided with the 25th anniversary of the series’ initial broadcast in September 1990, and presented the film for the first time in the same fidelity and framing as the negative that Ken Burns and his co-cinematographers Allen Moore and Buddy Squires shot more than 25 years ago.

    Funding for the 25th Anniversary presentation of The Civil War was provided by Bank of America, The Corporation for Public Broadcasting and PBS.

  7. author
    biggorilla964 17 Jan 2017 23:26

    If the people who owned people as property had believed it was morally wrong, there would not have been a war, in my opinion, but I was not there. That is the opinion of many, but it sure is not mine, and I am sure you can find quotes for either opinion. Many say it was state rights; The confederate wanted to form a completely different region, or nation, or whatever may have formed if they had won. Many say they would have been comprised of individual states without a federal government, or a federal government far, far weaker than the one we have. However, for many, it was about human rights. Looking on people as property was an offense to their beliefs. War is very complicated. Western expansion.each new state that joined the US had to decide whether they would be slave-owning states or not. The federal government had already been passing laws forbidding any new states from becoming slave-owning states. This was an economic thing.people who vilely owned humans as chattel could produce goods cheaper than the businesses who did not use humans as slaves. On another note, slavery had no longer become profitable in terms of exporting people from other countries. Many say it was becoming non-profitable anyway. Many say all they had to do was wait, that a war was not necessary, but I for one am glad they finally decided to fight, even though so many died, and it was atrocious. I recently read about John Brown, whom I knew little about. He was killed as a terrorist. When President Obama said recently that white people did not feel back people s pain, I was saddened that he remembered so little of our history. The cotton gin was supposed to help but it increased slavery, as an aside. I recently read "Twelve Years A Slave" by Solomon Northrup and I highly recommend it to everyone. Seriously tuffy? Sidd s opinion is one many from the NORTH believed, not the South.

  8. author
    greenbutterfly865 18 Jan 2017 08:37

    The Civil War lasted from 1861 to 1865 and led to over 618,000 casualties. Its causes can be traced back to tensions that formed early in the nation s history. Following are the top five causes that led to the "War Between the States." 1. Economic and social differences between the North and the South. With Eli Whitney’s invention of the cotton gin in 1793, cotton became very profitable. This machine was able to reduce the time it took to separate seeds from the cotton. However, at the same time the increase in the number of plantations willing to move from other crops to cotton meant the greater need for a large amount of cheap labor, i.e. slaves. Thus, the southern economy became a one crop economy, depending on cotton and therefore on slavery. On the other hand, the northern economy was based more on industry than agriculture. In fact, the northern industries were purchasing the raw cotton and turning it into finished goods. This disparity between the two set up a major difference in economic attitudes. The South was based on the plantation system while the North was focused on city life. This change in the North meant that society evolved as people of different cultures and classes had to work together. On the other hand, the South continued to hold onto an antiquated social order. 2. States versus federal rights. Since the time of the Revolution, two camps emerged: those arguing for greater states rights and those arguing that the federal government needed to have more control. The first organized government in the US after the American Revolution was under the Articles of Confederation. The thirteen states formed a loose confederation with a very weak federal government. However, when problems arose, the weakness of this form of government caused the leaders of the time to come together at the Constitutional Convention and create, in secret, the US Constitution. Strong proponents of states rights like Thomas Jefferson and Patrick Henry were not present at this meeting. Many felt that the new constitution ignored the rights of states to continue to act independently. They felt that the states should still have the right to decide if they were willing to accept certain federal acts. This resulted in the idea of nullification, whereby the states would have the right to rule federal acts unconstitutional. The federal government denied states this right. However, proponents such as John C. Calhoun fought vehemently for nullification. When nullification would not work and states felt that they were no longer respected, they moved towards secession. 3. The fight between Slave and Non-Slave State Proponents. As America began to expand, first with the lands gained from the Louisiana Purchase and later with the Mexican War, the question of whether new states admitted to the union would be slave or free. The Missouri Compromise passed in 1820 made a rule that prohibited slavery in states from the former Louisiana Purchase the latitude 36 degrees 30 minutes north except in Missouri. During the Mexican War, conflict started about what would happen with the new territories that the US expected to gain upon victory. David Wilmot proposed the Wilmot Proviso in 1846 which would ban slavery in the new lands. However, this was shot down to much debate. The Compromise of 1850 was created by Henry Clay and others to deal with the balance between slave and free states, northern and southern interests. One of the provisions was the fugitive slave act that was discussed in number one above. Another issue that further increased tensions was the Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854. It created two new territories that would allow the states to use popular sovereignty to determine whether they would be free or slave. The real issue occurred in Kansas where proslavery Missourians began to pour into the state to help force it to be slave. They were called “Border Ruffians.” Problems came to a head in violence at Lawrence Kansas. The fighting that occurred caused it to be called “Bleeding Kansas.” The fight even erupted on the floor of the senate when antislavery proponent Charles Sumner was beat over the head by South Carolina’s Senator Preston Brooks. 4. Growth of the Abolition Movement. Increasingly, the northerners became more polarized against slavery. Sympathies began to grow for abolitionists and against slavery and slaveholders. This occurred especially after some major events including: the publishing of Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin, the Dred Scott Case, John Brown’s Raid, and the passage of the fugitive slave act that held individuals responsible for harboring fugitive slaves even if they were located in non-slave states. 5. The election of Abraham Lincoln. Even though things were already coming to a head, when Lincoln was elected in 1860, South Carolina issued its “Declaration of the Causes of Secession.” They believed that Lincoln was anti-slavery and in favor of Northern interests

  9. author
    Ирина Воинова 17 Jan 2017 23:12

    Today in History : Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

    • 55TH ANNUAL BARONDESS/LINCOLN AWARD PRESENTATION
    • 1842 Civil War Restored Vintage Brick Farm House For Sale
    • Honor Answering Honor: “Bloody Chamberlain” and the Surrender at Appomattox
    • National Museum of the United States Army Spotlight: Outbreak of War Exhibit
    • Available now: 2016 Mort Kunstler Collectible Ornament "The Winds of Winter"
    • 4 Star General Takes Polar Bear Plunge in WWII
    • The Civil War Round Table of New York Presenting Peter Cozzens

    Abraham Lincoln †
    Ulysses S. Grant
    William T. Sherman
    David Farragut
    George B. McClellan
    George Meade
    John Pope

    Jefferson Davis
    Robert E. Lee
    P.G.T. Beauregard
    Stonewall Jackson + †
    Nathan B. Forrest
    Joseph E. Johnston

    Join us to save 243 acres at four battlefields in Virginia and West Virginia — and take advantage of a $14.96-to-$1 match.

    Get your stunning calendar — commemorating the 30th anniversary of the Civil War Trust and featuring beautiful battlefield photos—for just $12.95.

    In the course of our conversation, Yacine Kout mentioned something else—an incident that had happened the previous spring at Eastern Randolph High School just outside Asheboro. On Cinco de Mayo, the annual celebration of Mexico’s defeat of French forces at the Battle of Puebla in 1862, a lot of Hispanic students brought Mexican flags to school. The next day, Kout said, white students brought Confederate flags to school as a message: This is our heritage.

    But an equally important reason was a vigorous, sustained effort by Southerners to literally rewrite history—and among the most ardent revisionists were a group of respectable white Southern matrons known as the United Daughters of the Confederacy.

    Roy F. Nichols , The Disruption of American Democracy , 1948.
    Kenneth M. Stampp , And War Came , 1950.
    Eric Foner , Free Soil, Free Labor, Free Men , 1970.
    William L. Barney , The Road to Secession , 1972.
    Michael F. Holt , The Political Crisis of the 1850s , 1973.
    David M. Potter , The Impending Crisis, 1848–1861 , 1976.
    J. Mills Thornton III , Politics and Power in a Slave Society , 1978.
    Daniel W. Crofts , Reluctant Confederates , 1989.
    Bruce Levine , Half Slave and Half Free , 1992.

    Northern leaders, particularly Abraham Lincoln and Seward, were absolutely committed to the preservation of the Union and also understood that the European reaction to the American crisis was critical. Seward, especially, believed that secession lacked majority support in the South and that Southern Unionists would rise and end the secession movement by the spring of 1861. It was essential that the Southern extremists receive no encouragement from abroad, without which expectation, Seward believed, the Confederacy would be short-lived.

  10. author
    赤木美奈/М!na ÅʞaG! 17 Jan 2017 23:31

    Today in History : Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

    • 55TH ANNUAL BARONDESS/LINCOLN AWARD PRESENTATION
    • 1842 Civil War Restored Vintage Brick Farm House For Sale
    • Honor Answering Honor: “Bloody Chamberlain” and the Surrender at Appomattox
    • National Museum of the United States Army Spotlight: Outbreak of War Exhibit
    • Available now: 2016 Mort Kunstler Collectible Ornament "The Winds of Winter"
    • 4 Star General Takes Polar Bear Plunge in WWII
    • The Civil War Round Table of New York Presenting Peter Cozzens

    Abraham Lincoln †
    Ulysses S. Grant
    William T. Sherman
    David Farragut
    George B. McClellan
    George Meade
    John Pope

    Jefferson Davis
    Robert E. Lee
    P.G.T. Beauregard
    Stonewall Jackson + †
    Nathan B. Forrest
    Joseph E. Johnston

    Join us to save 243 acres at four battlefields in Virginia and West Virginia — and take advantage of a $14.96-to-$1 match.

    Get your stunning calendar — commemorating the 30th anniversary of the Civil War Trust and featuring beautiful battlefield photos—for just $12.95.

  11. author
    bluekoala804 18 Jan 2017 09:18

    Order essay here the causes of the civil war essay

    The Civil War lasted between 1861 and 1865 and it resulted to more than 618,000 casualties. However, the causes of Civil War can be traced back to tensions that were created early in the history of the nation. Mainly, the war between the sates was caused by social and economic differences between the South and the North, federal rights versus the state, the differences between slave and non-slave state proponents, growth of the abolition movement, and the election of Abraham Lincoln (Calore 2008, 5).

    In accordance with Calore (2008) cotton became very profitable in 1793 following the invention of the cotton gin by Eli Whitney. As a matter of fact, this machine greatly minimised the time used to separate seeds from cotton. Nevertheless, the number of plantation farmers willing to move from growing other crops to growing cotton increased leading to increased demand for large amount of cheap labor (slaves). Therefore, the economy of the south became a single crop economy that depended mainly on cotton and thus increased dependence on slavery (8).

  12. author
    сегодня я плакса 18 Jan 2017 03:35

    Today in History : Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

    • 55TH ANNUAL BARONDESS/LINCOLN AWARD PRESENTATION
    • 1842 Civil War Restored Vintage Brick Farm House For Sale
    • Honor Answering Honor: “Bloody Chamberlain” and the Surrender at Appomattox
    • National Museum of the United States Army Spotlight: Outbreak of War Exhibit
    • Available now: 2016 Mort Kunstler Collectible Ornament "The Winds of Winter"
    • 4 Star General Takes Polar Bear Plunge in WWII
    • The Civil War Round Table of New York Presenting Peter Cozzens

    Abraham Lincoln †
    Ulysses S. Grant
    William T. Sherman
    David Farragut
    George B. McClellan
    George Meade
    John Pope

    Jefferson Davis
    Robert E. Lee
    P.G.T. Beauregard
    Stonewall Jackson + †
    Nathan B. Forrest
    Joseph E. Johnston

    Join us to save 243 acres at four battlefields in Virginia and West Virginia — and take advantage of a $14.96-to-$1 match.

    Get your stunning calendar — commemorating the 30th anniversary of the Civil War Trust and featuring beautiful battlefield photos—for just $12.95.

    In the course of our conversation, Yacine Kout mentioned something else—an incident that had happened the previous spring at Eastern Randolph High School just outside Asheboro. On Cinco de Mayo, the annual celebration of Mexico’s defeat of French forces at the Battle of Puebla in 1862, a lot of Hispanic students brought Mexican flags to school. The next day, Kout said, white students brought Confederate flags to school as a message: This is our heritage.

    But an equally important reason was a vigorous, sustained effort by Southerners to literally rewrite history—and among the most ardent revisionists were a group of respectable white Southern matrons known as the United Daughters of the Confederacy.

    Roy F. Nichols , The Disruption of American Democracy , 1948.
    Kenneth M. Stampp , And War Came , 1950.
    Eric Foner , Free Soil, Free Labor, Free Men , 1970.
    William L. Barney , The Road to Secession , 1972.
    Michael F. Holt , The Political Crisis of the 1850s , 1973.
    David M. Potter , The Impending Crisis, 1848–1861 , 1976.
    J. Mills Thornton III , Politics and Power in a Slave Society , 1978.
    Daniel W. Crofts , Reluctant Confederates , 1989.
    Bruce Levine , Half Slave and Half Free , 1992.

    Northern leaders, particularly Abraham Lincoln and Seward, were absolutely committed to the preservation of the Union and also understood that the European reaction to the American crisis was critical. Seward, especially, believed that secession lacked majority support in the South and that Southern Unionists would rise and end the secession movement by the spring of 1861. It was essential that the Southern extremists receive no encouragement from abroad, without which expectation, Seward believed, the Confederacy would be short-lived.

    The Civil War , the award-winning film produced and directed by Ken Burns, was rebroadcast as a newly restored, high-definition version in September of 2015. The 2015 rebroadcast coincided with the 25th anniversary of the series’ initial broadcast in September 1990, and presented the film for the first time in the same fidelity and framing as the negative that Ken Burns and his co-cinematographers Allen Moore and Buddy Squires shot more than 25 years ago.

    Funding for the 25th Anniversary presentation of The Civil War was provided by Bank of America, The Corporation for Public Broadcasting and PBS.

    The Civil War was the first war that was widely photographed. Many American Civil War Images, Pictures and Photos have survived.

    The battlefields of the Civil War cross the nation, and made famous many previously unknown towns, crossroads and farms like Antietam Creek, Shiloh and Gettysburg.

    After they lost Atlanta, the Confederate army headed west into Tennessee and Alabama , attacking Union supply lines as they went. Sherman was reluctant to set off on a wild goose chase across the South, however, and so he split his troops into two groups. Major General George Thomas took some 60,000 men to meet the Confederates in Nashville, while Sherman took the remaining 62,000 on an offensive march through Georgia to Savannah, “smashing things” (he wrote) “ to the sea.”

    Sherman believed that the Confederacy derived its strength not from its fighting forces but from the material and moral support of sympathetic Southern whites. Factories, farms and railroads provided Confederate troops with the things they needed, he reasoned; and if he could destroy those things, the Confederate war effort would collapse. Meanwhile, his troops could undermine Southern morale by making life so unpleasant for Georgia’s civilians that they would demand an end to the war.

  13. author
    tinyswan500 18 Jan 2017 07:02