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What is sociology GCSE?

18 Jan 2017 21:24 | Author: Lisjane | Category: Essay domestic animal dog

The sociology of scientific knowledge ( SSK ) is the study of science as a social activity, especially dealing with "the social conditions and effects of science, and with the social structures and processes of scientific activity." [1] The sociology of scientific ignorance (SSI) is complementary to the sociology of scientific knowledge. [2] [3] For comparison, the sociology of knowledge studies the impact of human knowledge and the prevailing ideas on societies and relations between knowledge and the social context within which it arises.

Sociologists of scientific knowledge study the development of a scientific field and attempt to identify points of contingency or interpretative flexibility where ambiguities are present. Such variations may be linked to a variety of political , historical , cultural or economic factors. Crucially, the field does not set out to promote relativism or to attack the scientific project; the aim of the researcher is to explain why one interpretation rather than another succeeds due to external social and historical circumstances.

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  1. author
    Щロ(やまぐち) 17 Jan 2017 22:39

    i took Sociology O.L in my IGCSE i liked it immensely, it introduces us to the society and how socialisation takes part in shaping people s behaviours, i mostly liked the nature vs nurture debate; the idea that sociology can explain why people turn the way they are or why they differ from country to country while biology and genetics are too general to explain this. you must forgive me i don t really remember the precises of what i took, but i remember there was a chapter about socialisation and the social control and how both of them are a key element of how we came to describe ourselves as human beings with proof from research about children who grew up in a different socialisation like a boy named Shamdev who lived among wolves and when discovered he could not communicate with humans only with wolves and he ate raw meat. when they tried to re-socialise him back to a human being their trials failed and he died. the chapter discribed the role of family, friends, the media, the school, religion and others in socialising children to adulthood to fit in their culture it also talked about different societies and their different cultures and subcultures (one of which being the youth subculture) how some tribes have completely different views in life and different social control methods enforced, for one they don t depend on the legal system as urban people do. it was a fun chapter, and the most introductory to sociology. i chose this chapter among the ones we were told to choose from. Crime and Deviancy (i chose this one too) which talked about the legal system, the police and how social control is done in school and with friends. the types of crime and what drives people to commit crime, the reasons and the implications; how going to prison may completely ruin one s life prospects and his position in society. this chapter is short and easy Social Stratification is also a chapter i chose (the hardest of what i chose but all the more fun) it dealt with the difference between the levels people have in society, the middle class, the upper class, the under class. also the views of Karl Marx for Proletariat and Bourgeoisie and Max Weber s views also with a good but brief deal about Communism and Capitalism. the work force and the difference between men and women in the work force, the discrimination that some people have towards others of ethnic minorities.so on Family was another chapter i chose, (long but easy and great) this one described most family obligations and problems, it showed the role of women and men in the family and how it has changed over the centuries, how they overlapped and how the decline of the image of family became the norm in our life now. the extended family relatives and how in some societies they are still influential. the divorce and it s consequences was also discussed, also the lone parents that increased with the change of society and how some people regard them as the basis for most society s problems...so on also a basic chapter about Research Methods which is compulsorily taught. the chapters i didn t choose were the education and politics chapters so i know none in those except that they are difficult :). the curriculum is so fun and gripping i really loved going to those lessons, i m sorry i was of little help, i kind of forgot many things (unfortunately) it s essay quesiton based and has many terms to be known also many sociologists to learn about. if you like this sort of thing and have the ability to study by heart some things, this would be so great for you. i fear my too general descriptions may have discouraged you from taking it, that s a shame., but if it means anything, i give you my recommendation ^^ hope i helped.

  2. author
    乇ઽcrɨЪα ॐ® 17 Jan 2017 23:49

  3. author
    ٩(まòъóし)۶ べらす◯ダヨ! 18 Jan 2017 05:40

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    (New York: Simon & Schuster, 2000). In a groundbreaking book based on vast data, Putnam shows how we have become increasingly disconnected from family, friends, neighbors, and our democratic structures– and how we may reconnect.

    Putnam warns that our stock of social capital – the very fabric of our connections with each other, has plummeted, impoverishing our lives and communities.

    For the last few decades, the retreat from marriage has been regarded largely as a problem afflicting the poor. [1] But today, it is spreading into the solid middle of the middle class.

    The numbers are clear. Wherever we look among the communities that make up the bedrock of the American middle class whether small-town Maine, the working-class suburbs of southern Ohio, the farmlands of rural Arkansas, or the factory towns of North Carolina the data tell the same story: Divorce is high, nonmarital childbearing is spreading, and marital bliss is in increasingly short supply.

  4. author
    bluebird822 18 Jan 2017 03:47

    Sociology was founded in the mid-nineteenth century as a "science of society." I prefer to think of it as the study of social interaction. Sociologists utilized constructs (models), theories, and experiments in their studies. Since World War II, sociology has emphasized the use of the scientific method as the basis for conclusions. Sociologists study groups, culture (borrowing a lot of information from its sister science, anthropology), and socialization (borrowing some information from psychology, but relying more on studies by sociologists and social psychologists). Within the field of sociology, there is an area of study called demography, which studies various aspects of population: growth or decline, migration, life expectancy, and various rates which determine trends in society. Other sociologists concentrate on urban issues, such as the growth of cities, reasons for rural-urban shifts, and so forth. Sociology also covers collective behavior: the study of people in crowds, formation of mobs, circumstances surrounding panics, fads and fashions, and similar behavior that emerges when ordinary social controls are not being observed. Social change is an important part of modern sociology. Sociologists are interested in the causes of change, the effect that change has on various parts of society, and following the trends of change. Sociologists often specialize in the study of one or more social institutions. The institutions that seem to be universal are the family, education, religion or ideology, government, and economics. However, in advanced, industrial societies, other institutions like medicine or the media play significant roles. Generally, these interests of sociologists are analyzed through the use of three major perspectives: structural functionalism, conflict theory, and symbolic interactionism. However, in recent times, other perspectives, such as the feminist perspective, have played important roles in understanding society. .

  5. author
    greenlion465 18 Jan 2017 21:23

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    (New York: Simon & Schuster, 2000). In a groundbreaking book based on vast data, Putnam shows how we have become increasingly disconnected from family, friends, neighbors, and our democratic structures– and how we may reconnect.

    Putnam warns that our stock of social capital – the very fabric of our connections with each other, has plummeted, impoverishing our lives and communities.

  6. author
    Karaas`ь 18 Jan 2017 05:48

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  7. author
    organicfish883 18 Jan 2017 02:26

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    (New York: Simon & Schuster, 2000). In a groundbreaking book based on vast data, Putnam shows how we have become increasingly disconnected from family, friends, neighbors, and our democratic structures– and how we may reconnect.

    Putnam warns that our stock of social capital – the very fabric of our connections with each other, has plummeted, impoverishing our lives and communities.

    For the last few decades, the retreat from marriage has been regarded largely as a problem afflicting the poor. [1] But today, it is spreading into the solid middle of the middle class.

    The numbers are clear. Wherever we look among the communities that make up the bedrock of the American middle class whether small-town Maine, the working-class suburbs of southern Ohio, the farmlands of rural Arkansas, or the factory towns of North Carolina the data tell the same story: Divorce is high, nonmarital childbearing is spreading, and marital bliss is in increasingly short supply.

    Friendship is a relationship of mutual affection between people. [1] Friendship is a stronger form of interpersonal bond than an association. Friendship has been studied in academic fields such as sociology , social psychology , anthropology , and philosophy. Various academic theories of friendship have been proposed, including social exchange theory , equity theory , relational dialectics , and attachment styles. A World Happiness Database study found that people with close friendships are happier. [2]

    Although there are many forms of friendship, some of which may vary from place to place, certain characteristics are present in many types of bond. Such characteristics include affection, sympathy , empathy , honesty , altruism , mutual understanding , and compassion , enjoyment of each other's company, trust , and the ability to be oneself, express one's feelings, and make mistakes without fear of judgment from the friend.

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    greendog802 18 Jan 2017 09:12

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  9. author
    やまねぇ(ФωФ) 18 Jan 2017 03:17

    Order paper here sociology essay is the family in decline

    The sociology of scientific knowledge ( SSK ) is the study of science as a social activity, especially dealing with "the social conditions and effects of science, and with the social structures and processes of scientific activity." [1] The sociology of scientific ignorance (SSI) is complementary to the sociology of scientific knowledge. [2] [3] For comparison, the sociology of knowledge studies the impact of human knowledge and the prevailing ideas on societies and relations between knowledge and the social context within which it arises.

    Sociologists of scientific knowledge study the development of a scientific field and attempt to identify points of contingency or interpretative flexibility where ambiguities are present. Such variations may be linked to a variety of political , historical , cultural or economic factors. Crucially, the field does not set out to promote relativism or to attack the scientific project; the aim of the researcher is to explain why one interpretation rather than another succeeds due to external social and historical circumstances.

  10. author
    purplegorilla292 18 Jan 2017 21:23

    Is the nuclear family in decline?. Sociology The Family. Sign up to view the whole essay and download the PDF for anytime access on your computer,.