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SparkNotes: Animal Farm: Plot Overview

18 Jan 2017 21:24 | Author: Аамкаанаа ❤️ | Category: Resume sur la guerre de troie naura pas lieu

Animal Farm is an allegorical novella by George Orwell , first published in England on 17 August 1945. According to Orwell, the book reflects events leading up to the Russian Revolution of 1917 and then on into the Stalinist era of the Soviet Union. [1] Orwell, a democratic socialist , [2] was a critic of Joseph Stalin and hostile to Moscow-directed Stalinism , an attitude that was critically shaped by his experiences during the Spanish Civil War. [3] The Soviet Union, he believed, had become a brutal dictatorship , built upon a cult of personality and enforced by a reign of terror. In a letter to Yvonne Davet, Orwell described Animal Farm as a satirical tale against Stalin (" un conte satirique contre Staline "), [4] and in his essay " Why I Write " (1946), wrote that Animal Farm was the first book in which he tried, with full consciousness of what he was doing, "to fuse political purpose and artistic purpose into one whole".

The original title was Animal Farm: A Fairy Story; U.S. publishers dropped the subtitle when it was published in 1946, and only one of the translations during Orwell's lifetime kept it. Other titular variations include subtitles like " A Satire" and " A Contemporary Satire". [4] Orwell suggested the title Union des républiques socialistes animales for the French translation, which abbreviates to URSA, the Latin word for "bear", a symbol of Russia. It also played on the French name of the Soviet Union, Union des républiques socialistes soviétiques. [4]

Comments
  1. author
    LynetteWolfe 18 Jan 2017 00:29

    Orwell wrote the book between November 1943 and February 1944, when the UK was in its wartime alliance with the Soviet Union and the British people and intelligentsia held Stalin in high esteem, a phenomenon Orwell hated. [5] The manuscript was initially rejected by a number of British and American publishers, [6] including one of Orwell''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s own, Victor Gollancz , which delayed its publication. It became a great commercial success when it did appear partly because international relations were transformed as the wartime alliance gave way to the Cold War. [7]

    Time magazine chose the book as one of the 100 best English-language novels (1923 to 2005); [8] it also featured at number 31 on the Modern Library List of Best 20th-Century Novels. It won a Retrospective Hugo Award in 1996, and is also included in the Great Books of the Western World selection.

    genre · Dystopian animal fable; satire; allegory; political roman à clef (French for “novel with a key” a thinly veiled exposé of factual persons or events)

    narrator · Animal Farm is the only work by Orwell in which the author does not appear conspicuously as a narrator or major character; it is the least overtly personal of all of his writings. The anonymous narrator of the story is almost a nonentity, notable for no individual idiosyncrasies or biases.

    6. Which of the animals does most of the heavy labor and adopts the motto :Ï will work harder"? Boxer
    7. Boxer, who believes that he has unintentionally killed a stable boy in the chaos, expresses his regret at taking a life, even though it is a human one. Snowball tells him not to feel guilty, asserting that “the only good human being is a dead one.”
    8. After the banishment of Snowball, the animals learn that Napoleon supports the windmill project
    9.The pigs begin living in the farmhouse, and rumor has it that they e. Read more

    I would have loved to see Snowball come back, apparently as would most people. But that is only while looking at the literal sense of the book. If you look at the book on a deeper level, when you notice the satire and allegory, you will see that Snowball had to leave and not come back, for he represents Leon Trotsky, a man who was driven out of Russia by Joseph Stalin (Napoleon).

    Following is an excerpt from a letter from George Orwell to Dwight Macdonald, written in December 1946, soon after the publication of Animal Farm in the US. According to the editor of the letters, Peter Davison, who also supplied the footnotes, Macdonald wrote Orwell that

    anti-Stalinist intellectuals of his acquaintance claimed that the parable of Animal Farm meant that revolution always ended badly for the underdog, “hence to hell with it and hail the status quo.” He himself read the book as applying solely to Russia and not making any larger statement about the philosophy of revolution. “I’ve been impressed with how many leftists I know make this criticism quite independently of each other—impressed because it didn’t occur to me when reading the book and still doesn’t seem correct to me. Which view would you say comes closer to you own intentions?”

    Satire is a genre of literature , and sometimes graphic and performing arts , in which vices, follies, abuses, and shortcomings are held up to ridicule, ideally with the intent of shaming individuals, corporations, government, or society itself into improvement. [1] Although satire is usually meant to be humorous, its greater purpose is often constructive social criticism , using wit to draw attention to both particular and wider issues in society.

    A feature of satire is strong irony or sarcasm —"in satire, irony is militant" [2] —but parody , burlesque , exaggeration , [3] juxtaposition, comparison, analogy, and double entendre are all frequently used in satirical speech and writing. This "militant" irony or sarcasm often professes to approve of (or at least accept as natural) the very things the satirist wishes to attack.

  2. author
    アノン(か・×・け)_Эⁿ✩ 18 Jan 2017 05:29

    This Site Might Help You. RE: how does George Orwell use satire to show his views of the Russian Revolution in Animal Farm? In the book animal farm how does George Orwell use satire to show his views soo confussed its for my english essay in class we have another hour and i think i wasted my time last hour HELP please

  3. author
    blackbutterfly126 18 Jan 2017 04:20

    Orwell wrote the book between November 1943 and February 1944, when the UK was in its wartime alliance with the Soviet Union and the British people and intelligentsia held Stalin in high esteem, a phenomenon Orwell hated. [5] The manuscript was initially rejected by a number of British and American publishers, [6] including one of Orwell''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s own, Victor Gollancz , which delayed its publication. It became a great commercial success when it did appear partly because international relations were transformed as the wartime alliance gave way to the Cold War. [7]

    Time magazine chose the book as one of the 100 best English-language novels (1923 to 2005); [8] it also featured at number 31 on the Modern Library List of Best 20th-Century Novels. It won a Retrospective Hugo Award in 1996, and is also included in the Great Books of the Western World selection.

    genre · Dystopian animal fable; satire; allegory; political roman à clef (French for “novel with a key” a thinly veiled exposé of factual persons or events)

    narrator · Animal Farm is the only work by Orwell in which the author does not appear conspicuously as a narrator or major character; it is the least overtly personal of all of his writings. The anonymous narrator of the story is almost a nonentity, notable for no individual idiosyncrasies or biases.

    6. Which of the animals does most of the heavy labor and adopts the motto :Ï will work harder"? Boxer
    7. Boxer, who believes that he has unintentionally killed a stable boy in the chaos, expresses his regret at taking a life, even though it is a human one. Snowball tells him not to feel guilty, asserting that “the only good human being is a dead one.”
    8. After the banishment of Snowball, the animals learn that Napoleon supports the windmill project
    9.The pigs begin living in the farmhouse, and rumor has it that they e. Read more

    I would have loved to see Snowball come back, apparently as would most people. But that is only while looking at the literal sense of the book. If you look at the book on a deeper level, when you notice the satire and allegory, you will see that Snowball had to leave and not come back, for he represents Leon Trotsky, a man who was driven out of Russia by Joseph Stalin (Napoleon).

    Following is an excerpt from a letter from George Orwell to Dwight Macdonald, written in December 1946, soon after the publication of Animal Farm in the US. According to the editor of the letters, Peter Davison, who also supplied the footnotes, Macdonald wrote Orwell that

    anti-Stalinist intellectuals of his acquaintance claimed that the parable of Animal Farm meant that revolution always ended badly for the underdog, “hence to hell with it and hail the status quo.” He himself read the book as applying solely to Russia and not making any larger statement about the philosophy of revolution. “I’ve been impressed with how many leftists I know make this criticism quite independently of each other—impressed because it didn’t occur to me when reading the book and still doesn’t seem correct to me. Which view would you say comes closer to you own intentions?”

    Satire is a genre of literature , and sometimes graphic and performing arts , in which vices, follies, abuses, and shortcomings are held up to ridicule, ideally with the intent of shaming individuals, corporations, government, or society itself into improvement. [1] Although satire is usually meant to be humorous, its greater purpose is often constructive social criticism , using wit to draw attention to both particular and wider issues in society.

    A feature of satire is strong irony or sarcasm —"in satire, irony is militant" [2] —but parody , burlesque , exaggeration , [3] juxtaposition, comparison, analogy, and double entendre are all frequently used in satirical speech and writing. This "militant" irony or sarcasm often professes to approve of (or at least accept as natural) the very things the satirist wishes to attack.

  4. author
    Елена Сельв*рова 18 Jan 2017 04:57

    Orwell wrote the book between November 1943 and February 1944, when the UK was in its wartime alliance with the Soviet Union and the British people and intelligentsia held Stalin in high esteem, a phenomenon Orwell hated. [5] The manuscript was initially rejected by a number of British and American publishers, [6] including one of Orwell''''s own, Victor Gollancz , which delayed its publication. It became a great commercial success when it did appear partly because international relations were transformed as the wartime alliance gave way to the Cold War. [7]

    Time magazine chose the book as one of the 100 best English-language novels (1923 to 2005); [8] it also featured at number 31 on the Modern Library List of Best 20th-Century Novels. It won a Retrospective Hugo Award in 1996, and is also included in the Great Books of the Western World selection.

    genre · Dystopian animal fable; satire; allegory; political roman à clef (French for “novel with a key” a thinly veiled exposé of factual persons or events)

    narrator · Animal Farm is the only work by Orwell in which the author does not appear conspicuously as a narrator or major character; it is the least overtly personal of all of his writings. The anonymous narrator of the story is almost a nonentity, notable for no individual idiosyncrasies or biases.

  5. author
    beautifulbear374 17 Jan 2017 22:37

    Orwell wrote the book between November 1943 and February 1944, when the UK was in its wartime alliance with the Soviet Union and the British people and intelligentsia held Stalin in high esteem, a phenomenon Orwell hated. [5] The manuscript was initially rejected by a number of British and American publishers, [6] including one of Orwell''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s own, Victor Gollancz , which delayed its publication. It became a great commercial success when it did appear partly because international relations were transformed as the wartime alliance gave way to the Cold War. [7]

    Time magazine chose the book as one of the 100 best English-language novels (1923 to 2005); [8] it also featured at number 31 on the Modern Library List of Best 20th-Century Novels. It won a Retrospective Hugo Award in 1996, and is also included in the Great Books of the Western World selection.

    genre · Dystopian animal fable; satire; allegory; political roman à clef (French for “novel with a key” a thinly veiled exposé of factual persons or events)

    narrator · Animal Farm is the only work by Orwell in which the author does not appear conspicuously as a narrator or major character; it is the least overtly personal of all of his writings. The anonymous narrator of the story is almost a nonentity, notable for no individual idiosyncrasies or biases.

    6. Which of the animals does most of the heavy labor and adopts the motto :Ï will work harder"? Boxer
    7. Boxer, who believes that he has unintentionally killed a stable boy in the chaos, expresses his regret at taking a life, even though it is a human one. Snowball tells him not to feel guilty, asserting that “the only good human being is a dead one.”
    8. After the banishment of Snowball, the animals learn that Napoleon supports the windmill project
    9.The pigs begin living in the farmhouse, and rumor has it that they e. Read more

    I would have loved to see Snowball come back, apparently as would most people. But that is only while looking at the literal sense of the book. If you look at the book on a deeper level, when you notice the satire and allegory, you will see that Snowball had to leave and not come back, for he represents Leon Trotsky, a man who was driven out of Russia by Joseph Stalin (Napoleon).

    Following is an excerpt from a letter from George Orwell to Dwight Macdonald, written in December 1946, soon after the publication of Animal Farm in the US. According to the editor of the letters, Peter Davison, who also supplied the footnotes, Macdonald wrote Orwell that

    anti-Stalinist intellectuals of his acquaintance claimed that the parable of Animal Farm meant that revolution always ended badly for the underdog, “hence to hell with it and hail the status quo.” He himself read the book as applying solely to Russia and not making any larger statement about the philosophy of revolution. “I’ve been impressed with how many leftists I know make this criticism quite independently of each other—impressed because it didn’t occur to me when reading the book and still doesn’t seem correct to me. Which view would you say comes closer to you own intentions?”

    Satire is a genre of literature , and sometimes graphic and performing arts , in which vices, follies, abuses, and shortcomings are held up to ridicule, ideally with the intent of shaming individuals, corporations, government, or society itself into improvement. [1] Although satire is usually meant to be humorous, its greater purpose is often constructive social criticism , using wit to draw attention to both particular and wider issues in society.

    A feature of satire is strong irony or sarcasm —"in satire, irony is militant" [2] —but parody , burlesque , exaggeration , [3] juxtaposition, comparison, analogy, and double entendre are all frequently used in satirical speech and writing. This "militant" irony or sarcasm often professes to approve of (or at least accept as natural) the very things the satirist wishes to attack.

  6. author
    purplefrog912 18 Jan 2017 09:06

    Animal Farm: Character Profiles, Free Study Guides and book notes including comprehensive chapter analysis, complete summary analysis, author biography information.

  7. author
    І р е н 18 Jan 2017 07:23

    Orwell wrote the book between November 1943 and February 1944, when the UK was in its wartime alliance with the Soviet Union and the British people and intelligentsia held Stalin in high esteem, a phenomenon Orwell hated. [5] The manuscript was initially rejected by a number of British and American publishers, [6] including one of Orwell''''''''s own, Victor Gollancz , which delayed its publication. It became a great commercial success when it did appear partly because international relations were transformed as the wartime alliance gave way to the Cold War. [7]

    Time magazine chose the book as one of the 100 best English-language novels (1923 to 2005); [8] it also featured at number 31 on the Modern Library List of Best 20th-Century Novels. It won a Retrospective Hugo Award in 1996, and is also included in the Great Books of the Western World selection.

    genre · Dystopian animal fable; satire; allegory; political roman à clef (French for “novel with a key” a thinly veiled exposé of factual persons or events)

    narrator · Animal Farm is the only work by Orwell in which the author does not appear conspicuously as a narrator or major character; it is the least overtly personal of all of his writings. The anonymous narrator of the story is almost a nonentity, notable for no individual idiosyncrasies or biases.

    6. Which of the animals does most of the heavy labor and adopts the motto :Ï will work harder"? Boxer
    7. Boxer, who believes that he has unintentionally killed a stable boy in the chaos, expresses his regret at taking a life, even though it is a human one. Snowball tells him not to feel guilty, asserting that “the only good human being is a dead one.”
    8. After the banishment of Snowball, the animals learn that Napoleon supports the windmill project
    9.The pigs begin living in the farmhouse, and rumor has it that they e. Read more

    I would have loved to see Snowball come back, apparently as would most people. But that is only while looking at the literal sense of the book. If you look at the book on a deeper level, when you notice the satire and allegory, you will see that Snowball had to leave and not come back, for he represents Leon Trotsky, a man who was driven out of Russia by Joseph Stalin (Napoleon).

  8. author
    соня 17 Jan 2017 22:15

    Orwell wrote the book between November 1943 and February 1944, when the UK was in its wartime alliance with the Soviet Union and the British people and intelligentsia held Stalin in high esteem, a phenomenon Orwell hated. [5] The manuscript was initially rejected by a number of British and American publishers, [6] including one of Orwell''''''''''''''''s own, Victor Gollancz , which delayed its publication. It became a great commercial success when it did appear partly because international relations were transformed as the wartime alliance gave way to the Cold War. [7]

    Time magazine chose the book as one of the 100 best English-language novels (1923 to 2005); [8] it also featured at number 31 on the Modern Library List of Best 20th-Century Novels. It won a Retrospective Hugo Award in 1996, and is also included in the Great Books of the Western World selection.

    genre · Dystopian animal fable; satire; allegory; political roman à clef (French for “novel with a key” a thinly veiled exposé of factual persons or events)

    narrator · Animal Farm is the only work by Orwell in which the author does not appear conspicuously as a narrator or major character; it is the least overtly personal of all of his writings. The anonymous narrator of the story is almost a nonentity, notable for no individual idiosyncrasies or biases.

    6. Which of the animals does most of the heavy labor and adopts the motto :Ï will work harder"? Boxer
    7. Boxer, who believes that he has unintentionally killed a stable boy in the chaos, expresses his regret at taking a life, even though it is a human one. Snowball tells him not to feel guilty, asserting that “the only good human being is a dead one.”
    8. After the banishment of Snowball, the animals learn that Napoleon supports the windmill project
    9.The pigs begin living in the farmhouse, and rumor has it that they e. Read more

    I would have loved to see Snowball come back, apparently as would most people. But that is only while looking at the literal sense of the book. If you look at the book on a deeper level, when you notice the satire and allegory, you will see that Snowball had to leave and not come back, for he represents Leon Trotsky, a man who was driven out of Russia by Joseph Stalin (Napoleon).

    Following is an excerpt from a letter from George Orwell to Dwight Macdonald, written in December 1946, soon after the publication of Animal Farm in the US. According to the editor of the letters, Peter Davison, who also supplied the footnotes, Macdonald wrote Orwell that

    anti-Stalinist intellectuals of his acquaintance claimed that the parable of Animal Farm meant that revolution always ended badly for the underdog, “hence to hell with it and hail the status quo.” He himself read the book as applying solely to Russia and not making any larger statement about the philosophy of revolution. “I’ve been impressed with how many leftists I know make this criticism quite independently of each other—impressed because it didn’t occur to me when reading the book and still doesn’t seem correct to me. Which view would you say comes closer to you own intentions?”

  9. author
    brownduck612 18 Jan 2017 04:51

    Orwell wrote the book between November 1943 and February 1944, when the UK was in its wartime alliance with the Soviet Union and the British people and intelligentsia held Stalin in high esteem, a phenomenon Orwell hated. [5] The manuscript was initially rejected by a number of British and American publishers, [6] including one of Orwell''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s own, Victor Gollancz , which delayed its publication. It became a great commercial success when it did appear partly because international relations were transformed as the wartime alliance gave way to the Cold War. [7]

    Time magazine chose the book as one of the 100 best English-language novels (1923 to 2005); [8] it also featured at number 31 on the Modern Library List of Best 20th-Century Novels. It won a Retrospective Hugo Award in 1996, and is also included in the Great Books of the Western World selection.

    genre · Dystopian animal fable; satire; allegory; political roman à clef (French for “novel with a key” a thinly veiled exposé of factual persons or events)

    narrator · Animal Farm is the only work by Orwell in which the author does not appear conspicuously as a narrator or major character; it is the least overtly personal of all of his writings. The anonymous narrator of the story is almost a nonentity, notable for no individual idiosyncrasies or biases.

    6. Which of the animals does most of the heavy labor and adopts the motto :Ï will work harder"? Boxer
    7. Boxer, who believes that he has unintentionally killed a stable boy in the chaos, expresses his regret at taking a life, even though it is a human one. Snowball tells him not to feel guilty, asserting that “the only good human being is a dead one.”
    8. After the banishment of Snowball, the animals learn that Napoleon supports the windmill project
    9.The pigs begin living in the farmhouse, and rumor has it that they e. Read more

    I would have loved to see Snowball come back, apparently as would most people. But that is only while looking at the literal sense of the book. If you look at the book on a deeper level, when you notice the satire and allegory, you will see that Snowball had to leave and not come back, for he represents Leon Trotsky, a man who was driven out of Russia by Joseph Stalin (Napoleon).

    Following is an excerpt from a letter from George Orwell to Dwight Macdonald, written in December 1946, soon after the publication of Animal Farm in the US. According to the editor of the letters, Peter Davison, who also supplied the footnotes, Macdonald wrote Orwell that

    anti-Stalinist intellectuals of his acquaintance claimed that the parable of Animal Farm meant that revolution always ended badly for the underdog, “hence to hell with it and hail the status quo.” He himself read the book as applying solely to Russia and not making any larger statement about the philosophy of revolution. “I’ve been impressed with how many leftists I know make this criticism quite independently of each other—impressed because it didn’t occur to me when reading the book and still doesn’t seem correct to me. Which view would you say comes closer to you own intentions?”

    Satire is a genre of literature , and sometimes graphic and performing arts , in which vices, follies, abuses, and shortcomings are held up to ridicule, ideally with the intent of shaming individuals, corporations, government, or society itself into improvement. [1] Although satire is usually meant to be humorous, its greater purpose is often constructive social criticism , using wit to draw attention to both particular and wider issues in society.

    A feature of satire is strong irony or sarcasm —"in satire, irony is militant" [2] —but parody , burlesque , exaggeration , [3] juxtaposition, comparison, analogy, and double entendre are all frequently used in satirical speech and writing. This "militant" irony or sarcasm often professes to approve of (or at least accept as natural) the very things the satirist wishes to attack.

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