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Free crucible Essays and Papers - 123helpme

18 Jan 2017 21:24 | Author: User1492177831 | Category: Projectcoordinator sample resume

Asummary of Act I: The entrance of John Proctor to the entrance of Reverend Hale in Arthur Miller's The Crucible. Learn exactly what happened in this.

Comments
  1. author
    bigbear250 18 Jan 2017 02:28

    Talk about a character arc. Hale starts out with a Van Helsing-esque vendetta (against witches, not vampires) and ends up a broken, cynical man.

    With the notable exception of John Proctor, Hale gets our vote for most complex character in The Crucible. He starts off with really good intentions—even if he has a bit of a chip on his shoulder. In Act I, Miller writes of Hale: "His goal is light, goodness, and its preservation." This guy has trained and trained to be the best witch-hunter ever, and he's psyched to finally get a chance to show off his stuff. Though he's probably a little full of himself, his ultimate goal is to valiantly fight the Devil. What could be wrong with that?

  2. author
    crazyfish446 18 Jan 2017 04:21

    Talk about a character arc. Hale starts out with a Van Helsing-esque vendetta (against witches, not vampires) and ends up a broken, cynical man.

    With the notable exception of John Proctor, Hale gets our vote for most complex character in The Crucible. He starts off with really good intentions—even if he has a bit of a chip on his shoulder. In Act I, Miller writes of Hale: "His goal is light, goodness, and its preservation." This guy has trained and trained to be the best witch-hunter ever, and he''''s psyched to finally get a chance to show off his stuff. Though he''''s probably a little full of himself, his ultimate goal is to valiantly fight the Devil. What could be wrong with that?

    Reverend Hale is an intellectual man, and he has studied witchcraft extensively. He arrives at Parris’s home with a heavy load of books. Hale asks Proctor and Giles if they have afflicted children. Giles says that Proctor does not believe in witches. Proctor denies having stated an opinion on witches at all and leaves Hale to his work.

    Parris relates the tale of finding the girls dancing in the forest at night, and Mrs. Putnam reports having sent her daughter to conjure the spirits of her dead children. She asks if losing seven children before they live a day is a natural occurrence. Hale consults his books while Rebecca announces that she is too old to sit in on the proceedings. Parris insists that they may find the source of all the community’s troubles, but she leaves anyway.

    John Proctor , a local farmer, enters Parris’s house to join the girls. Proctor disdains hypocrisy, and many people resent him for exposing their foolishness. However, Proctor is uneasy with himself because he had conducted an extramarital affair with Abigail. His wife, Elizabeth, discovered the affair and promptly dismissed Abigail from her work at the Proctor home.

    Parris and Giles bicker over the question of whether Parris should be granted six pounds for firewood expenses. Parris claims that the six pounds are part of his salary and that his contract stipulates that the community provide him with firewood. Giles claims that Parris overstepped his boundaries in asking for the deed to his (Parris’s) house. Parris replies that he does not want the community to be able to toss him out on a whim; his possession of the deed will make it more difficult for citizens to disobey the church.

  3. author
    beautifulsnake397 18 Jan 2017 07:03

    Reverend Hale is pleading fervently with Elizabeth to get her husband to confess to witchcraft in order to spare his life. Proctor will not confess for the mere fact that he is innocent of being a witch, and if he does confess there will be innocent people that will die. It lends credence to the idea that witches actually exist in the world. Proctor in essence is sacrificing his life for principle. Hale thinks John should confess even though it is a lie. Hale, earlier in the play, was one of the most ardent witch hunters, but has since concluded that the trials are wrong and unjust. He feels responsible for the aggregious acts that have transpired since and even counts himself as murderer of those accused. Hale becomes a very. likeable character in the play as he is one of the only ones that actually admits he was wrong. So in essence he feels Proctor s life is more valuable than the principle Proctor is standing up for.

  4. author
    lazyrabbit597 17 Jan 2017 23:47

    Ignore the jerk who answered first. He s been trolling all of the questions relating to homework. I think you chose good characters. Proctor is a great choice.

  5. author
    syоkо︎︎︎︎ 👸西野家 🐠倖田組 17 Jan 2017 23:28

    Talk about a character arc. Hale starts out with a Van Helsing-esque vendetta (against witches, not vampires) and ends up a broken, cynical man.

    With the notable exception of John Proctor, Hale gets our vote for most complex character in The Crucible. He starts off with really good intentions—even if he has a bit of a chip on his shoulder. In Act I, Miller writes of Hale: "His goal is light, goodness, and its preservation." This guy has trained and trained to be the best witch-hunter ever, and he''s psyched to finally get a chance to show off his stuff. Though he''s probably a little full of himself, his ultimate goal is to valiantly fight the Devil. What could be wrong with that?

    Reverend Hale is an intellectual man, and he has studied witchcraft extensively. He arrives at Parris’s home with a heavy load of books. Hale asks Proctor and Giles if they have afflicted children. Giles says that Proctor does not believe in witches. Proctor denies having stated an opinion on witches at all and leaves Hale to his work.

    Parris relates the tale of finding the girls dancing in the forest at night, and Mrs. Putnam reports having sent her daughter to conjure the spirits of her dead children. She asks if losing seven children before they live a day is a natural occurrence. Hale consults his books while Rebecca announces that she is too old to sit in on the proceedings. Parris insists that they may find the source of all the community’s troubles, but she leaves anyway.

  6. author
    organicladybug766 18 Jan 2017 08:26

    The Crucible Reverend Hale Character Analysis Uploaded by tr00datp00nar on Dec 21, 2005. Reverend Hale’s character is dramatically changed throughout Arthur Miller.