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Romeo and Juliet fate?

18 Jan 2017 21:24 | Author: NAKAMIN 平常運転 | Category: Banking corporate dissertation governance sector

Sorted by subject: inspirational, thought-provoking, humorous, and literary; quotes for occasions and greetings.

Comments
  1. author
    т de Tomfia  🍃 18 Jan 2017 05:35

    Just before Romeo heads over to the Capulet ball, where he falls in love with and meets (in that order) Juliet, he tells us that he has a funny feeling—like something "hanging in the stars" (something destined to happen) will get moving. Uh-oh. We have a feeling, too—a bad feeling.

    ROMEO
    I fear, too early, for my mind misgives
    Some consequence yet hanging in the stars
    Shall bitterly begin his fearful date
    With this night''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s revels, and expire the term
    Of a despisèd life closed in my breast
    By some vile forfeit of untimely death.
    (1.4.113-118)

    In this scene, as Romeo is expressing this passion, he shares it with his friend Benvolio—he can''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t seem to keep it to himself. This introduces the notion that love does not merely occur between two individuals; others can and will mediate the expressions and feelings of love.

    In Romeo and Juliet , Shakespeare explores the theme of fate by allowing the audience to be party to his characters’ destiny. In the opening lines of the play, the audience is told what is going to happen to the lovers: “a pair of star-cross d lovers take their life.” Throughout the story , the audience is put in an omnipotent, god-like position from the start encouraging them to think about fate and to what extent our actions are free.

    Because we know Romeo and Juliet’s fate from the outset we are constantly hoping that they will take a different course – perhaps that Romeo will arrive just after Juliet has woken. However, their fate is sealed and we are forced to question our own destiny and ability to make free choices.

    In act 2 scene 5 Nurse appears to be tired and sore and tell Romeo the news NOT in act 2 scene 4 as sparknotes have written down.

    We are reading Romeo and Juliet in my class and it is so confusing because of the way they talked back then. Sparknotes has been a great help.

    Romeo and Juliet, one of Shakespeare s iconic tragedies, is a play about star-crossed lovers. It is one of the most famous works by William Shakespeare , consistently taught and staged at the high school and higher levels.

    As their families feud to the death, the two young lovers are caught between divergent and volatilely disparate worlds. Fights, witty lines, secret marriages, and untimely deaths--the play is unforgettable!

    On the floating island of Neo Verona, Leontes Montague and his men lead a bloody coup and murder all the members of ruling House Capulet. Only Lord Capulet's young daughter, Juliet, is able to escape. Fourteen years later, Leontes rules the land with an iron fist and crushes anyone who opposes him. Juliet, now sixteen, fights against House Montague's oppression as the masked vigilante "The Red Whirlwind." While attending the Rose Ball hosted by the Montagues with a friend, Juliet meets Romeo, Prince Montague's son and both of them fall deeply in love at first sight.

    Romeo is a kind, caring, selfless, and humble man who is opposed to his father's cruelty and tyranny and shares many ideals with Juliet. Unfortunately for them, Capulet loyalists are planning a rebellion to overthrow House Montague, while Leontes is obsessed with destroying the threat of the House of Capulet permanently. As these starcrossed lovers face many challenges and adventures together which will strengthen and deepen their true unwavering romantic love even further, an ancient secret hidden deep within Neo Verona is slowly revealed.

  2. author
    brownfish426 18 Jan 2017 06:58

    Just before Romeo heads over to the Capulet ball, where he falls in love with and meets (in that order) Juliet, he tells us that he has a funny feeling—like something "hanging in the stars" (something destined to happen) will get moving. Uh-oh. We have a feeling, too—a bad feeling.

    ROMEO
    I fear, too early, for my mind misgives
    Some consequence yet hanging in the stars
    Shall bitterly begin his fearful date
    With this night''''s revels, and expire the term
    Of a despisèd life closed in my breast
    By some vile forfeit of untimely death.
    (1.4.113-118)

    In this scene, as Romeo is expressing this passion, he shares it with his friend Benvolio—he can''t seem to keep it to himself. This introduces the notion that love does not merely occur between two individuals; others can and will mediate the expressions and feelings of love.

    In Romeo and Juliet , Shakespeare explores the theme of fate by allowing the audience to be party to his characters’ destiny. In the opening lines of the play, the audience is told what is going to happen to the lovers: “a pair of star-cross d lovers take their life.” Throughout the story , the audience is put in an omnipotent, god-like position from the start encouraging them to think about fate and to what extent our actions are free.

    Because we know Romeo and Juliet’s fate from the outset we are constantly hoping that they will take a different course – perhaps that Romeo will arrive just after Juliet has woken. However, their fate is sealed and we are forced to question our own destiny and ability to make free choices.

  3. author
    organicmeercat928 18 Jan 2017 08:16

    Just before Romeo heads over to the Capulet ball, where he falls in love with and meets (in that order) Juliet, he tells us that he has a funny feeling—like something "hanging in the stars" (something destined to happen) will get moving. Uh-oh. We have a feeling, too—a bad feeling.

    ROMEO
    I fear, too early, for my mind misgives
    Some consequence yet hanging in the stars
    Shall bitterly begin his fearful date
    With this night''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s revels, and expire the term
    Of a despisèd life closed in my breast
    By some vile forfeit of untimely death.
    (1.4.113-118)

    In this scene, as Romeo is expressing this passion, he shares it with his friend Benvolio—he can''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t seem to keep it to himself. This introduces the notion that love does not merely occur between two individuals; others can and will mediate the expressions and feelings of love.

    In Romeo and Juliet , Shakespeare explores the theme of fate by allowing the audience to be party to his characters’ destiny. In the opening lines of the play, the audience is told what is going to happen to the lovers: “a pair of star-cross d lovers take their life.” Throughout the story , the audience is put in an omnipotent, god-like position from the start encouraging them to think about fate and to what extent our actions are free.

    Because we know Romeo and Juliet’s fate from the outset we are constantly hoping that they will take a different course – perhaps that Romeo will arrive just after Juliet has woken. However, their fate is sealed and we are forced to question our own destiny and ability to make free choices.

    In act 2 scene 5 Nurse appears to be tired and sore and tell Romeo the news NOT in act 2 scene 4 as sparknotes have written down.

    We are reading Romeo and Juliet in my class and it is so confusing because of the way they talked back then. Sparknotes has been a great help.

    Romeo and Juliet, one of Shakespeare s iconic tragedies, is a play about star-crossed lovers. It is one of the most famous works by William Shakespeare , consistently taught and staged at the high school and higher levels.

    As their families feud to the death, the two young lovers are caught between divergent and volatilely disparate worlds. Fights, witty lines, secret marriages, and untimely deaths--the play is unforgettable!

    On the floating island of Neo Verona, Leontes Montague and his men lead a bloody coup and murder all the members of ruling House Capulet. Only Lord Capulet''''''''s young daughter, Juliet, is able to escape. Fourteen years later, Leontes rules the land with an iron fist and crushes anyone who opposes him. Juliet, now sixteen, fights against House Montague''''''''s oppression as the masked vigilante "The Red Whirlwind." While attending the Rose Ball hosted by the Montagues with a friend, Juliet meets Romeo, Prince Montague''''''''s son and both of them fall deeply in love at first sight.

    Romeo is a kind, caring, selfless, and humble man who is opposed to his father''''''''s cruelty and tyranny and shares many ideals with Juliet. Unfortunately for them, Capulet loyalists are planning a rebellion to overthrow House Montague, while Leontes is obsessed with destroying the threat of the House of Capulet permanently. As these starcrossed lovers face many challenges and adventures together which will strengthen and deepen their true unwavering romantic love even further, an ancient secret hidden deep within Neo Verona is slowly revealed.

    You are most likely familiar with the story of Romeo and Juliet—two teenaged, star-crossed lovers. However, how will you ever muddle through Shakespeare’s strange language and identify with this play? Following these 8 simple steps will help you see that the characters and themes of Romeo and Juliet are still alive and well today.   

    1) Read a modern translation along with the original. Most teachers will be happy for you to also use a modern translation because they know it can be tough to read and understand Romeo and Juliet at first. For an excellent side-by-side translation, see the eNotes version here. One word of caution, however—be sure to still read the original words. Once you get the hang of it (and we promise that you will), Shakespearean language brings the play’s time period, characters, and humor alive. You won’t want to miss out!

  4. author
    yellowswan769 17 Jan 2017 23:03

    Just before Romeo heads over to the Capulet ball, where he falls in love with and meets (in that order) Juliet, he tells us that he has a funny feeling—like something "hanging in the stars" (something destined to happen) will get moving. Uh-oh. We have a feeling, too—a bad feeling.

    ROMEO
    I fear, too early, for my mind misgives
    Some consequence yet hanging in the stars
    Shall bitterly begin his fearful date
    With this night''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s revels, and expire the term
    Of a despisèd life closed in my breast
    By some vile forfeit of untimely death.
    (1.4.113-118)

    In this scene, as Romeo is expressing this passion, he shares it with his friend Benvolio—he can''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t seem to keep it to himself. This introduces the notion that love does not merely occur between two individuals; others can and will mediate the expressions and feelings of love.

    In Romeo and Juliet , Shakespeare explores the theme of fate by allowing the audience to be party to his characters’ destiny. In the opening lines of the play, the audience is told what is going to happen to the lovers: “a pair of star-cross d lovers take their life.” Throughout the story , the audience is put in an omnipotent, god-like position from the start encouraging them to think about fate and to what extent our actions are free.

    Because we know Romeo and Juliet’s fate from the outset we are constantly hoping that they will take a different course – perhaps that Romeo will arrive just after Juliet has woken. However, their fate is sealed and we are forced to question our own destiny and ability to make free choices.

    In act 2 scene 5 Nurse appears to be tired and sore and tell Romeo the news NOT in act 2 scene 4 as sparknotes have written down.

    We are reading Romeo and Juliet in my class and it is so confusing because of the way they talked back then. Sparknotes has been a great help.

    Romeo and Juliet, one of Shakespeare s iconic tragedies, is a play about star-crossed lovers. It is one of the most famous works by William Shakespeare , consistently taught and staged at the high school and higher levels.

    As their families feud to the death, the two young lovers are caught between divergent and volatilely disparate worlds. Fights, witty lines, secret marriages, and untimely deaths--the play is unforgettable!

    On the floating island of Neo Verona, Leontes Montague and his men lead a bloody coup and murder all the members of ruling House Capulet. Only Lord Capulet''''s young daughter, Juliet, is able to escape. Fourteen years later, Leontes rules the land with an iron fist and crushes anyone who opposes him. Juliet, now sixteen, fights against House Montague''''s oppression as the masked vigilante "The Red Whirlwind." While attending the Rose Ball hosted by the Montagues with a friend, Juliet meets Romeo, Prince Montague''''s son and both of them fall deeply in love at first sight.

    Romeo is a kind, caring, selfless, and humble man who is opposed to his father''''s cruelty and tyranny and shares many ideals with Juliet. Unfortunately for them, Capulet loyalists are planning a rebellion to overthrow House Montague, while Leontes is obsessed with destroying the threat of the House of Capulet permanently. As these starcrossed lovers face many challenges and adventures together which will strengthen and deepen their true unwavering romantic love even further, an ancient secret hidden deep within Neo Verona is slowly revealed.

  5. author
    orangeelephant624 18 Jan 2017 02:26

    Juliet: o, bid me leap, rather than marry Paris, From off the battlements of yonder tower, Or walk in thievish ways, or bid me lurk Where serpents are; chain me with roaring bears, Or shut me nightly in a charnel house O ercovered quite with dead men s rattling bones, With reeky shanks and yellow chapless skulls; Or bid me go into a new made grave And hide me with a dead man in his shroud- Things that, to hear them told, have made me tremble- And i will do it without fear or doubt, To live an unstained wife to my sweet love.

  6. author
    lazyostrich337 18 Jan 2017 03:07

    Just before Romeo heads over to the Capulet ball, where he falls in love with and meets (in that order) Juliet, he tells us that he has a funny feeling—like something "hanging in the stars" (something destined to happen) will get moving. Uh-oh. We have a feeling, too—a bad feeling.

    ROMEO
    I fear, too early, for my mind misgives
    Some consequence yet hanging in the stars
    Shall bitterly begin his fearful date
    With this night''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s revels, and expire the term
    Of a despisèd life closed in my breast
    By some vile forfeit of untimely death.
    (1.4.113-118)

    In this scene, as Romeo is expressing this passion, he shares it with his friend Benvolio—he can''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t seem to keep it to himself. This introduces the notion that love does not merely occur between two individuals; others can and will mediate the expressions and feelings of love.

    In Romeo and Juliet , Shakespeare explores the theme of fate by allowing the audience to be party to his characters’ destiny. In the opening lines of the play, the audience is told what is going to happen to the lovers: “a pair of star-cross d lovers take their life.” Throughout the story , the audience is put in an omnipotent, god-like position from the start encouraging them to think about fate and to what extent our actions are free.

    Because we know Romeo and Juliet’s fate from the outset we are constantly hoping that they will take a different course – perhaps that Romeo will arrive just after Juliet has woken. However, their fate is sealed and we are forced to question our own destiny and ability to make free choices.

    In act 2 scene 5 Nurse appears to be tired and sore and tell Romeo the news NOT in act 2 scene 4 as sparknotes have written down.

    We are reading Romeo and Juliet in my class and it is so confusing because of the way they talked back then. Sparknotes has been a great help.

    Romeo and Juliet, one of Shakespeare s iconic tragedies, is a play about star-crossed lovers. It is one of the most famous works by William Shakespeare , consistently taught and staged at the high school and higher levels.

    As their families feud to the death, the two young lovers are caught between divergent and volatilely disparate worlds. Fights, witty lines, secret marriages, and untimely deaths--the play is unforgettable!

    On the floating island of Neo Verona, Leontes Montague and his men lead a bloody coup and murder all the members of ruling House Capulet. Only Lord Capulet''s young daughter, Juliet, is able to escape. Fourteen years later, Leontes rules the land with an iron fist and crushes anyone who opposes him. Juliet, now sixteen, fights against House Montague''s oppression as the masked vigilante "The Red Whirlwind." While attending the Rose Ball hosted by the Montagues with a friend, Juliet meets Romeo, Prince Montague''s son and both of them fall deeply in love at first sight.

    Romeo is a kind, caring, selfless, and humble man who is opposed to his father''s cruelty and tyranny and shares many ideals with Juliet. Unfortunately for them, Capulet loyalists are planning a rebellion to overthrow House Montague, while Leontes is obsessed with destroying the threat of the House of Capulet permanently. As these starcrossed lovers face many challenges and adventures together which will strengthen and deepen their true unwavering romantic love even further, an ancient secret hidden deep within Neo Verona is slowly revealed.

  7. author
    Syrax_MS 18 Jan 2017 03:03

    Just before Romeo heads over to the Capulet ball, where he falls in love with and meets (in that order) Juliet, he tells us that he has a funny feeling—like something "hanging in the stars" (something destined to happen) will get moving. Uh-oh. We have a feeling, too—a bad feeling.

    ROMEO
    I fear, too early, for my mind misgives
    Some consequence yet hanging in the stars
    Shall bitterly begin his fearful date
    With this night''s revels, and expire the term
    Of a despisèd life closed in my breast
    By some vile forfeit of untimely death.
    (1.4.113-118)

    In this scene, as Romeo is expressing this passion, he shares it with his friend Benvolio—he can't seem to keep it to himself. This introduces the notion that love does not merely occur between two individuals; others can and will mediate the expressions and feelings of love.

  8. author
    lazybird377 18 Jan 2017 05:31

    The chorus which opens Romeo and Juliet echoes the chorus of ancient Greek tragedies, a troupe of masked performers who explained, summarized, or.

  9. author
    Новый дизайн 18 Jan 2017 09:39

    Just before Romeo heads over to the Capulet ball, where he falls in love with and meets (in that order) Juliet, he tells us that he has a funny feeling—like something "hanging in the stars" (something destined to happen) will get moving. Uh-oh. We have a feeling, too—a bad feeling.

    ROMEO
    I fear, too early, for my mind misgives
    Some consequence yet hanging in the stars
    Shall bitterly begin his fearful date
    With this night''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s revels, and expire the term
    Of a despisèd life closed in my breast
    By some vile forfeit of untimely death.
    (1.4.113-118)

    In this scene, as Romeo is expressing this passion, he shares it with his friend Benvolio—he can''''''''''''''''t seem to keep it to himself. This introduces the notion that love does not merely occur between two individuals; others can and will mediate the expressions and feelings of love.

    In Romeo and Juliet , Shakespeare explores the theme of fate by allowing the audience to be party to his characters’ destiny. In the opening lines of the play, the audience is told what is going to happen to the lovers: “a pair of star-cross d lovers take their life.” Throughout the story , the audience is put in an omnipotent, god-like position from the start encouraging them to think about fate and to what extent our actions are free.

    Because we know Romeo and Juliet’s fate from the outset we are constantly hoping that they will take a different course – perhaps that Romeo will arrive just after Juliet has woken. However, their fate is sealed and we are forced to question our own destiny and ability to make free choices.

    In act 2 scene 5 Nurse appears to be tired and sore and tell Romeo the news NOT in act 2 scene 4 as sparknotes have written down.

    We are reading Romeo and Juliet in my class and it is so confusing because of the way they talked back then. Sparknotes has been a great help.

    Romeo and Juliet, one of Shakespeare s iconic tragedies, is a play about star-crossed lovers. It is one of the most famous works by William Shakespeare , consistently taught and staged at the high school and higher levels.

    As their families feud to the death, the two young lovers are caught between divergent and volatilely disparate worlds. Fights, witty lines, secret marriages, and untimely deaths--the play is unforgettable!

  10. author
    Darber† ☆ 18 Jan 2017 07:58

    Order essay here quotes on fate in romeo and juliet

    Sorted by subject: inspirational, thought-provoking, humorous, and literary; quotes for occasions and greetings.

  11. author
    Песталоци 18 Jan 2017 02:02

    Just before Romeo heads over to the Capulet ball, where he falls in love with and meets (in that order) Juliet, he tells us that he has a funny feeling—like something "hanging in the stars" (something destined to happen) will get moving. Uh-oh. We have a feeling, too—a bad feeling.

    ROMEO
    I fear, too early, for my mind misgives
    Some consequence yet hanging in the stars
    Shall bitterly begin his fearful date
    With this night''''''''''''''''s revels, and expire the term
    Of a despisèd life closed in my breast
    By some vile forfeit of untimely death.
    (1.4.113-118)

    In this scene, as Romeo is expressing this passion, he shares it with his friend Benvolio—he can''''''''t seem to keep it to himself. This introduces the notion that love does not merely occur between two individuals; others can and will mediate the expressions and feelings of love.

    In Romeo and Juliet , Shakespeare explores the theme of fate by allowing the audience to be party to his characters’ destiny. In the opening lines of the play, the audience is told what is going to happen to the lovers: “a pair of star-cross d lovers take their life.” Throughout the story , the audience is put in an omnipotent, god-like position from the start encouraging them to think about fate and to what extent our actions are free.

    Because we know Romeo and Juliet’s fate from the outset we are constantly hoping that they will take a different course – perhaps that Romeo will arrive just after Juliet has woken. However, their fate is sealed and we are forced to question our own destiny and ability to make free choices.

    In act 2 scene 5 Nurse appears to be tired and sore and tell Romeo the news NOT in act 2 scene 4 as sparknotes have written down.

    We are reading Romeo and Juliet in my class and it is so confusing because of the way they talked back then. Sparknotes has been a great help.

  12. author
    purpletiger683 18 Jan 2017 04:50

    Just before Romeo heads over to the Capulet ball, where he falls in love with and meets (in that order) Juliet, he tells us that he has a funny feeling—like something "hanging in the stars" (something destined to happen) will get moving. Uh-oh. We have a feeling, too—a bad feeling.

    ROMEO
    I fear, too early, for my mind misgives
    Some consequence yet hanging in the stars
    Shall bitterly begin his fearful date
    With this night''''''''s revels, and expire the term
    Of a despisèd life closed in my breast
    By some vile forfeit of untimely death.
    (1.4.113-118)

    In this scene, as Romeo is expressing this passion, he shares it with his friend Benvolio—he can''''t seem to keep it to himself. This introduces the notion that love does not merely occur between two individuals; others can and will mediate the expressions and feelings of love.

    In Romeo and Juliet , Shakespeare explores the theme of fate by allowing the audience to be party to his characters’ destiny. In the opening lines of the play, the audience is told what is going to happen to the lovers: “a pair of star-cross d lovers take their life.” Throughout the story , the audience is put in an omnipotent, god-like position from the start encouraging them to think about fate and to what extent our actions are free.

    Because we know Romeo and Juliet’s fate from the outset we are constantly hoping that they will take a different course – perhaps that Romeo will arrive just after Juliet has woken. However, their fate is sealed and we are forced to question our own destiny and ability to make free choices.

  13. author
    N_Eva 18 Jan 2017 03:33

    I was born free as Caesar; so were you: We both have fed as well, and we can both Endure the winter s cold as well as he. (1.2.97) Cowards die many times before their deaths; The valiant never taste of death but once. Of all the wonders that I yet have heard, It seems to me most strange that men should fear; Seeing that death, a necessary end, Will come when it will come. (2.2.34)