11

The Catcher in the Rye Quotes - Shmoop

18 Jan 2017 21:24 | Author: м.sαιєм ♪​‏​​ ²² | Category: Cite database research paper

Quotations about love, from The Quote Garden.. By love I mean a noble and sensuous passion, absorbing the energies of the soul, fulfilling destiny, and reducing.

Comments
  1. author
    purpledog948 18 Jan 2017 08:31

  2. author
    tinypeacock179 18 Jan 2017 04:51

    When Mr. Spencer advises Holden to see his life as a game, Holden pretends to affirm the sentiment. But in reality, he believes this worldview is only helpful to those who already hold positions of relative advantage.

    The disconnect between Holden’s external speech and his interior monologue marks his distance from adult society. His spoken language is polite and submissive, using the term “sir” and repeating with subservience “I know it is. I know it,” as if he does not have any additional independent thoughts. Yet when the text moves into his mind, we see a very different tone: one that immediately swears—“my ass”—and then goes on to invalidate his previous comment.

    Holden likes the Natural History museum because, no matter what else changed in his life, it was always the same: it was like a little freeze-frame picture of his own childhood, a safe spot he could always come back to.

    Or, as Matthew McConaughey says in Dazed and Confused : the great thing about high school girls is that you get older, and they just stay the same age.

    Quote 1: "If you really want to hear about it, the first thing you''''ll probably want to know is where I was born, and what my lousy childhood was like, and how my parents were occupied and all before they had me, and all that David Copperfield kind of crap, but I don''''t feel like going into it, if you want to know the truth." Chapter 1, pg. 1

    Quote 2: "Game, my ass. Some game. If you get on the side where all the hot-shots are, then it''''s a game, all right - I''''ll admit that. But if you get on the other side, where there aren''''t any hot-shots, then what''''s a game about it? Nothing. No game." Chapter 2, pg. 8

    Sixty-two years ago this week (on July 16, 1951) a novel about a boy rambling through Manhattan after being booted from prep school – penned by a little-known writer – first appeared on bookstore shelves. Today, you know this book as '' The Catcher in the Rye ,'' a major 20th-century classic, a story that has been translated into almost all the world''s major languages and has found recognition among all of them. Here, to mark the 52nd anniversary of ''Catcher,'' are 10 memorable lines from its pages.

    But it wasn''t just that he was the most intelligent member in the family. He was also the nicest, in lots of ways. He never got mad at anybody. People with red hair are supposed to get mad very easily, but Allie never did, and he had very red hair.

    . From a general summary to chapter summaries to explanations of famous quotes, the SparkNotes The Catcher in the Rye Study Guide has everything you need to ace quizzes, tests, and essays. .

    . SparkNotes: The Catcher in the Rye Video SparkNote Home →  Video SparkNotes →   The Catcher in the Rye The Catcher in the Rye Video SparkNotes Related Videos See all Video SparkNotes → Play 1984 by George .

  3. author
    lazymeercat701 18 Jan 2017 05:30

    This quote was from chapter 25. I guess there can be many interpretation to this quote, so here s just what I think (feel free to disagree) ***It s been a while since i read this book, so I may be a little off.*** I think this quote was said while Holden was in the museum (where the mummies were) and he sees a "f*ck you". He gets really mad for some reason (even though he found it amusing to see the other "f*ck you" at school). Then he starts to think about his own death and how people will probably write bad stuff about him. Anyways, Holden has always wanted to be alone and isolated people from his life. The only people he ll talk to are like prostitutes and stuff but never his friends (if he has any). Being a deaf-mute will mean that he can t listen to or talk with anybody, the ultimate isolation from society. This, in a way, symbolizes death in that no one has to care about him and he doesn t have to care about anyone. The ironic thing is that he later (I believe, again, I may be off.) talks about having another deaf-mute woman so that they could be together. So, deep inside, perhaps Holden doesn t want to be isolated from society. This may or may not be the answer you re looking for, but that was just my interpretation of the quote. If nothing else, you should read that chapter again and come up with your own conclusion :) good luck !! :)

  4. author
    .゚:;。+。ε( 캬래 )з。+.。゚ 17 Jan 2017 21:56

    When Mr. Spencer advises Holden to see his life as a game, Holden pretends to affirm the sentiment. But in reality, he believes this worldview is only helpful to those who already hold positions of relative advantage.

    The disconnect between Holden’s external speech and his interior monologue marks his distance from adult society. His spoken language is polite and submissive, using the term “sir” and repeating with subservience “I know it is. I know it,” as if he does not have any additional independent thoughts. Yet when the text moves into his mind, we see a very different tone: one that immediately swears—“my ass”—and then goes on to invalidate his previous comment.

    Holden likes the Natural History museum because, no matter what else changed in his life, it was always the same: it was like a little freeze-frame picture of his own childhood, a safe spot he could always come back to.

    Or, as Matthew McConaughey says in Dazed and Confused : the great thing about high school girls is that you get older, and they just stay the same age.

  5. author
    Vistina.mk 18 Jan 2017 08:12

    When Mr. Spencer advises Holden to see his life as a game, Holden pretends to affirm the sentiment. But in reality, he believes this worldview is only helpful to those who already hold positions of relative advantage.

    The disconnect between Holden’s external speech and his interior monologue marks his distance from adult society. His spoken language is polite and submissive, using the term “sir” and repeating with subservience “I know it is. I know it,” as if he does not have any additional independent thoughts. Yet when the text moves into his mind, we see a very different tone: one that immediately swears—“my ass”—and then goes on to invalidate his previous comment.

    Holden likes the Natural History museum because, no matter what else changed in his life, it was always the same: it was like a little freeze-frame picture of his own childhood, a safe spot he could always come back to.

    Or, as Matthew McConaughey says in Dazed and Confused : the great thing about high school girls is that you get older, and they just stay the same age.

    Quote 1: "If you really want to hear about it, the first thing you'll probably want to know is where I was born, and what my lousy childhood was like, and how my parents were occupied and all before they had me, and all that David Copperfield kind of crap, but I don't feel like going into it, if you want to know the truth." Chapter 1, pg. 1

    Quote 2: "Game, my ass. Some game. If you get on the side where all the hot-shots are, then it's a game, all right - I'll admit that. But if you get on the other side, where there aren't any hot-shots, then what's a game about it? Nothing. No game." Chapter 2, pg. 8

  6. author
    redfrog439 18 Jan 2017 00:20

    Well, isn't Holden's belief that humans in general are phony? That's a theme he keeps on talking about it throughout the story. In my opinion, this quote is indirectly pointing out to more people who are phony: ".they were too good." That says a lot about the underlying belief that they are phony.

  7. author
    mister chekov 17 Jan 2017 23:34

    SparkNotes: The Catcher in the Rye Video SparkNote. SparkNotes: The Catcher in the Rye Video SparkNote Home → Video SparkNotes → The Catcher in the Rye The.

  8. author
    brownrabbit390 18 Jan 2017 01:55

    When Mr. Spencer advises Holden to see his life as a game, Holden pretends to affirm the sentiment. But in reality, he believes this worldview is only helpful to those who already hold positions of relative advantage.

    The disconnect between Holden’s external speech and his interior monologue marks his distance from adult society. His spoken language is polite and submissive, using the term “sir” and repeating with subservience “I know it is. I know it,” as if he does not have any additional independent thoughts. Yet when the text moves into his mind, we see a very different tone: one that immediately swears—“my ass”—and then goes on to invalidate his previous comment.

  9. author
    Ц. Буд 18 Jan 2017 02:40

    never read the book but sound like the person is just trying to get though life with all problems and challanges physical but mostly emotional and phycological. but the clamoring part leads you to think it is not just getting though life but to push pull and climb to find your place in life.

  10. author
    smallpeacock603 18 Jan 2017 04:48

    When Mr. Spencer advises Holden to see his life as a game, Holden pretends to affirm the sentiment. But in reality, he believes this worldview is only helpful to those who already hold positions of relative advantage.

    The disconnect between Holden’s external speech and his interior monologue marks his distance from adult society. His spoken language is polite and submissive, using the term “sir” and repeating with subservience “I know it is. I know it,” as if he does not have any additional independent thoughts. Yet when the text moves into his mind, we see a very different tone: one that immediately swears—“my ass”—and then goes on to invalidate his previous comment.

    Holden likes the Natural History museum because, no matter what else changed in his life, it was always the same: it was like a little freeze-frame picture of his own childhood, a safe spot he could always come back to.

    Or, as Matthew McConaughey says in Dazed and Confused : the great thing about high school girls is that you get older, and they just stay the same age.

    Quote 1: "If you really want to hear about it, the first thing you''ll probably want to know is where I was born, and what my lousy childhood was like, and how my parents were occupied and all before they had me, and all that David Copperfield kind of crap, but I don''t feel like going into it, if you want to know the truth." Chapter 1, pg. 1

    Quote 2: "Game, my ass. Some game. If you get on the side where all the hot-shots are, then it''s a game, all right - I''ll admit that. But if you get on the other side, where there aren''t any hot-shots, then what''s a game about it? Nothing. No game." Chapter 2, pg. 8

    Sixty-two years ago this week (on July 16, 1951) a novel about a boy rambling through Manhattan after being booted from prep school – penned by a little-known writer – first appeared on bookstore shelves. Today, you know this book as ' The Catcher in the Rye ,' a major 20th-century classic, a story that has been translated into almost all the world's major languages and has found recognition among all of them. Here, to mark the 52nd anniversary of 'Catcher,' are 10 memorable lines from its pages.

    But it wasn't just that he was the most intelligent member in the family. He was also the nicest, in lots of ways. He never got mad at anybody. People with red hair are supposed to get mad very easily, but Allie never did, and he had very red hair.