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What books can I read to learn about Islam? and what is the best way to do it?

18 Jan 2017 21:24 | Author: silverpeacock914 | Category: Bodycare business plan

The question raised by the ouster of Egypt's President Morsi is whether Islam is compatible with democracy or any form of government that empowers the.

Comments
  1. author
    lazybutterfly359 18 Jan 2017 09:33

    Islam is utterly incompatible with democracy. Note that there has NEVER been a single Arab democratic country in history.

    Turkey is probably the best example of the probably irresolvable conflict between Islam and representative government as presently practiced in western Europe and the U.S. Kemal Ataturk was a great man, but the ideas of even a great man can be flawed.

    The Salafi movement or Salafist movement or Salafism is an ultra-conservative [1] reform [2] branch [3] [4] or movement within Sunni Islam [5] that developed in Arabia in the first half of the 18th century against a background of European colonialism. It advocated a return to the traditions of the "devout ancestors" (the salaf ). Some scholars define this movement as Modernist Salafism.

    This movement emerged as a liberal one, in the later 18th century in Egypt [6] – this variant is nowadays qualified as Modernist Salafism – before taking its contemporary orientation in the 1920s, [7] which ascribes itself in the ideology lineage of Ibn Taymiyya and has merged with the wahhabism which is now considered as synonymous. [8]

    Is there such a thing as bad religion? Or is religion by its very nature a good thing? Throughout most of history, most people wouldn’t have hesitated to label some religions as bad. The Romans condemned the child-sacrificing religion of the Carthaginians, Christians condemned the Aztec religion for its human sacrifice, and Catholics condemned Arians and Albigensians as heretics.

    The contemporary take on this question is altogether different. With the exception of some rabid atheists, most people—even those of no particular faith—have a positive view of religion. And Christians, especially, seem well-disposed to people of other faiths. Serious Christians are much more likely to be worried about the dangers inherent in secularism than the dangers posed by another religion. The current attitude seems to be that in the battle against secularism, people of faith—no matter what their faith—ought to stick together.

    Muslims are the fastest-growing religious group in the world. The growth and regional migration of Muslims, combined with the ongoing impact of the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) and other extremist groups that commit acts of violence in the name of Islam, have brought Muslims and the Islamic faith to the forefront of the political debate in many countries. Yet many facts about Muslims are not well known in some of these places, and most Americans – who live in a country with a relatively small Muslim population – say they know little or nothing about Islam.

    Here are answers to some key questions about Muslims, compiled from several Pew Research Center reports published in recent years:

  2. author
    lazyelephant136 18 Jan 2017 07:24

    Islam is utterly incompatible with democracy. Note that there has NEVER been a single Arab democratic country in history.

    Turkey is probably the best example of the probably irresolvable conflict between Islam and representative government as presently practiced in western Europe and the U.S. Kemal Ataturk was a great man, but the ideas of even a great man can be flawed.

    The Salafi movement or Salafist movement or Salafism is an ultra-conservative [1] reform [2] branch [3] [4] or movement within Sunni Islam [5] that developed in Arabia in the first half of the 18th century against a background of European colonialism. It advocated a return to the traditions of the "devout ancestors" (the salaf ). Some scholars define this movement as Modernist Salafism.

    This movement emerged as a liberal one, in the later 18th century in Egypt [6] – this variant is nowadays qualified as Modernist Salafism – before taking its contemporary orientation in the 1920s, [7] which ascribes itself in the ideology lineage of Ibn Taymiyya and has merged with the wahhabism which is now considered as synonymous. [8]

    Is there such a thing as bad religion? Or is religion by its very nature a good thing? Throughout most of history, most people wouldn’t have hesitated to label some religions as bad. The Romans condemned the child-sacrificing religion of the Carthaginians, Christians condemned the Aztec religion for its human sacrifice, and Catholics condemned Arians and Albigensians as heretics.

    The contemporary take on this question is altogether different. With the exception of some rabid atheists, most people—even those of no particular faith—have a positive view of religion. And Christians, especially, seem well-disposed to people of other faiths. Serious Christians are much more likely to be worried about the dangers inherent in secularism than the dangers posed by another religion. The current attitude seems to be that in the battle against secularism, people of faith—no matter what their faith—ought to stick together.

    Muslims are the fastest-growing religious group in the world. The growth and regional migration of Muslims, combined with the ongoing impact of the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) and other extremist groups that commit acts of violence in the name of Islam, have brought Muslims and the Islamic faith to the forefront of the political debate in many countries. Yet many facts about Muslims are not well known in some of these places, and most Americans – who live in a country with a relatively small Muslim population – say they know little or nothing about Islam.

    Here are answers to some key questions about Muslims, compiled from several Pew Research Center reports published in recent years:

    I’ll be honest, as badly as I want to stand in the face of some right-wing radical who’s proclaiming that Islam is a violent, hateful religion and tell them that they’re an idiot and nothing but an ignorant jackass I don’t know if I can say that and still honestly mean it.

    And let’s not forget that nearly five years ago,  South Park  (a show that brutally mocks and makes fun of practically everything)   had one of its episodes edited by Comedy Central following violent threats by Islamic groups concerning their making fun of Islam and the prophet Mohammad. In fact, one of these groups based out of New York , Revolution Muslim,  said at the time that South Park creators Trey Parker and Matt Stone would probably end up like Theo van Gough for making fun of Islam. 

  3. author
    crazyleopard527 18 Jan 2017 08:33

    Islam is utterly incompatible with democracy. Note that there has NEVER been a single Arab democratic country in history.And there won't be. Voting in a democracy.

  4. author
    goldenbear916 18 Jan 2017 01:59

    Technically you are probably right. Can one fail to reach your destiny? Kind of an oxymoron. What he means is God has a perfect plan for your life, but if you mess with drugs, free sex, booze and armed robbery, you will drift far from your potential, and never get anywhere near that to which you could have, and should have, been "destined". How you exercise your free will will ultimately determine where you are at any point, in relation to the "narrow road" which will lead to God. Almost everybody criss crosses the path, drifting into the grass verge now and then etc. Many, however drift so far, that they fall right down the hill, and may well never be able to find their way back to the path. That s what "following Jesus" is really all about, my friend.

  5. author
    redgorilla260 18 Jan 2017 00:52

    Islam is utterly incompatible with democracy. Note that there has NEVER been a single Arab democratic country in history.

    Turkey is probably the best example of the probably irresolvable conflict between Islam and representative government as presently practiced in western Europe and the U.S. Kemal Ataturk was a great man, but the ideas of even a great man can be flawed.

  6. author
    † Хикару 18 Jan 2017 01:16

    Islam is utterly incompatible with democracy. Note that there has NEVER been a single Arab democratic country in history.

    Turkey is probably the best example of the probably irresolvable conflict between Islam and representative government as presently practiced in western Europe and the U.S. Kemal Ataturk was a great man, but the ideas of even a great man can be flawed.

    The Salafi movement or Salafist movement or Salafism is an ultra-conservative [1] reform [2] branch [3] [4] or movement within Sunni Islam [5] that developed in Arabia in the first half of the 18th century against a background of European colonialism. It advocated a return to the traditions of the "devout ancestors" (the salaf ). Some scholars define this movement as Modernist Salafism.

    This movement emerged as a liberal one, in the later 18th century in Egypt [6] – this variant is nowadays qualified as Modernist Salafism – before taking its contemporary orientation in the 1920s, [7] which ascribes itself in the ideology lineage of Ibn Taymiyya and has merged with the wahhabism which is now considered as synonymous. [8]

    Is there such a thing as bad religion? Or is religion by its very nature a good thing? Throughout most of history, most people wouldn’t have hesitated to label some religions as bad. The Romans condemned the child-sacrificing religion of the Carthaginians, Christians condemned the Aztec religion for its human sacrifice, and Catholics condemned Arians and Albigensians as heretics.

    The contemporary take on this question is altogether different. With the exception of some rabid atheists, most people—even those of no particular faith—have a positive view of religion. And Christians, especially, seem well-disposed to people of other faiths. Serious Christians are much more likely to be worried about the dangers inherent in secularism than the dangers posed by another religion. The current attitude seems to be that in the battle against secularism, people of faith—no matter what their faith—ought to stick together.

    Muslims are the fastest-growing religious group in the world. The growth and regional migration of Muslims, combined with the ongoing impact of the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) and other extremist groups that commit acts of violence in the name of Islam, have brought Muslims and the Islamic faith to the forefront of the political debate in many countries. Yet many facts about Muslims are not well known in some of these places, and most Americans – who live in a country with a relatively small Muslim population – say they know little or nothing about Islam.

    Here are answers to some key questions about Muslims, compiled from several Pew Research Center reports published in recent years:

    I’ll be honest, as badly as I want to stand in the face of some right-wing radical who’s proclaiming that Islam is a violent, hateful religion and tell them that they’re an idiot and nothing but an ignorant jackass I don’t know if I can say that and still honestly mean it.

    And let’s not forget that nearly five years ago,  South Park  (a show that brutally mocks and makes fun of practically everything)   had one of its episodes edited by Comedy Central following violent threats by Islamic groups concerning their making fun of Islam and the prophet Mohammad. In fact, one of these groups based out of New York , Revolution Muslim,  said at the time that South Park creators Trey Parker and Matt Stone would probably end up like Theo van Gough for making fun of Islam. 

    All Sufi orders trace many of their original precepts from Muhammad through his cousin and son-in-law Ali with the notable exception of the Naqshbandi , who claim to trace their origins from Muhammad through the first Rashid Caliph, Abu Bakr. [38] Sufi orders largely follow one of the four madhhabs (jurisprudent schools of thought) of Sunni Islam and maintain a Sunni aqidah (creed). [39]

    The term Sufism came into being, not by Islamic texts or Sufis themselves but by British Orientalists who wanted to create an artificial divide between what they found attractive in Islamic civilization (i.e. Islamic Spirituality) and the negative stereotypes that were present in Britain about Islam. [44] These British orientalists, therefore, fabricated a divide that was previously non-existent. [44] The term Sufism has, however, persisted especially in the Western world ever since.

  7. author
    crazymouse105 18 Jan 2017 04:06

    “She s tough, she s confident. It s funny, our beauty standard has become harder and tougher because we live in a tough age. I don t think anyone wants to walk down the street and feel vulnerable. You want to walk down the street and feel like you re in control.” - Tom Ford “(Almost) no team is going to be 100 percent compatible. Our team was different, though.” - Britani Pittullo “We connected. Very compatible. Very similar ideas.” - Wayne Krivsky “He and I were about as compatible as a rat and a boa constrictor.” - Stevie Nicks

  8. author
    Катя ты мое 18 Jan 2017 04:38

    Order paper here quotes about islam and democracy compatible

    The question raised by the ouster of Egypt''s President Morsi is whether Islam is compatible with democracy or any form of government that empowers the.

  9. author
    greenrabbit548 18 Jan 2017 07:06

    Islam is utterly incompatible with democracy. Note that there has NEVER been a single Arab democratic country in history.

    Turkey is probably the best example of the probably irresolvable conflict between Islam and representative government as presently practiced in western Europe and the U.S. Kemal Ataturk was a great man, but the ideas of even a great man can be flawed.

    The Salafi movement or Salafist movement or Salafism is an ultra-conservative [1] reform [2] branch [3] [4] or movement within Sunni Islam [5] that developed in Arabia in the first half of the 18th century against a background of European colonialism. It advocated a return to the traditions of the "devout ancestors" (the salaf ). Some scholars define this movement as Modernist Salafism.

    This movement emerged as a liberal one, in the later 18th century in Egypt [6] – this variant is nowadays qualified as Modernist Salafism – before taking its contemporary orientation in the 1920s, [7] which ascribes itself in the ideology lineage of Ibn Taymiyya and has merged with the wahhabism which is now considered as synonymous. [8]

  10. author
    ыᶏκ ⚡ ぴぴ 18 Jan 2017 03:41

    •Dear Salsa, Your question: Is Islam (and Shariah) compatible with democracy and secularism? Yes and no. About democracy, I will quote from Wikipedia and interpret it. However, I believe that democracy is an imperfect form of government which does less to protect the rights of the minorities, see below for explanation. Democracy: Democracy is a form of government in which the right to govern is vested in the citizens of a country or a state and exercised through a majority rule. A democracy can denote either direct or indirect rule by the people. -> This indicates either a rule by vote or formation of a voted government. This also indicates that if the majority of the people have a belief or religion, this would be the prevailing religion or belief. Logically if the majority are Muslims it is upto them to chose their government. This can also happen if the majorities are Hindus (as in Nepal). In both scenarios it is possible that the minority views will be unrepresented or under-represented. Secularism can be practiced only if religion is removed from governance, so Saudi Arabia or Nepal are non-secular countries. There are both good and bad points in religious governments. Now addressing your other point: 1. When Muslims live in a non-Muslim majority democratic country, they want to usually live in peace and want equal rights as laid out in the law. But let’s imagine that the Muslims become a majority in the same country. Then they would want to implement Islamic law which does NOT allow propagation of other faiths, does NOT allow non-Muslims as head of state, kills Muslims who convert to other religions, force women to adhere to their interpretation of "modesty", etc. Answer: Unfortunately in a democracy, as stated before, the majority decides their form of Government. I quote here again: "Economists since Milton Friedman have strongly criticized the efficiency of democracy. They base this on their premise of the irrational voter. Their argument is that voters are highly uninformed about many political issues, especially relating to economics, and have a strong bias about the few issues on which they are fairly knowledgeable." If there is a religious majority they may have a strong bias. Democratic tribes in Papua New-Guinea practice cannibalism. However, this practice is irrational (and uneasy) for other societies. Muslim religion like many other religions is interpreted. Thus one has Sufis and Whhabis. Their source could be the same but practices are very different. For example our beliefs derived from the teachings of Lal Shahbaz Qalander, says that the most important religion to follow is humanity i.e., food to the hungry, clothes to the naked-poor, shelter for the homeless and water to the thirsty etc. We dont know or care for the religion of the hungry, homeless or the beaten-down. These principles are also enshrined with quotes in the holy book of "Guru Granth Sahib" the religious book of the Sikhs. Baba Farid another of our Sufi saints is considered one of the founding fathers of Sikhism. 2. So how can Muslims demand equal rights in a democratic country when they themselves will not accord these rights to others in their own countries? (look at most Muslim majority countries) Nobody can claim any rights other than the practice of humanity whatever their religion as long as hunger and poverty exists. However, there are some topics of Islam that I will encourage my brothers to practice, for example, compulsory charity. This is an example of poverty in Pakistan: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kXXrsifWu. We are not such a well developed country like India so our people need to focus on alleviating such suffering and practice the supreme religion of humanity. I guess the institution of democracy in India has at least abolished hunger and poverty. ----------------------- Again I quote here: "The "majority rule" is often described as a characteristic feature of democracy, but without responsible government it is possible for the rights of a minority to be abused by the "tyranny of the majority"."-> Destruction of mosques or temples are some examples of "tyranny of the majority". This should be carefully considered. In summary, Islam has as much to do with democracy as does any other religion. Irrational voters, oppression of minorities and under-representation can be a problem in democracy. Humanity is the greatest religion and should be incorporated in any governance. This may or may not happen is an imperfect governance such as democracy. Thanks Rehman

  11. author
    whitesnake320 18 Jan 2017 09:13

    Islam is utterly incompatible with democracy. Note that there has NEVER been a single Arab democratic country in history.

    Turkey is probably the best example of the probably irresolvable conflict between Islam and representative government as presently practiced in western Europe and the U.S. Kemal Ataturk was a great man, but the ideas of even a great man can be flawed.

    The Salafi movement or Salafist movement or Salafism is an ultra-conservative [1] reform [2] branch [3] [4] or movement within Sunni Islam [5] that developed in Arabia in the first half of the 18th century against a background of European colonialism. It advocated a return to the traditions of the "devout ancestors" (the salaf ). Some scholars define this movement as Modernist Salafism.

    This movement emerged as a liberal one, in the later 18th century in Egypt [6] – this variant is nowadays qualified as Modernist Salafism – before taking its contemporary orientation in the 1920s, [7] which ascribes itself in the ideology lineage of Ibn Taymiyya and has merged with the wahhabism which is now considered as synonymous. [8]

    Is there such a thing as bad religion? Or is religion by its very nature a good thing? Throughout most of history, most people wouldn’t have hesitated to label some religions as bad. The Romans condemned the child-sacrificing religion of the Carthaginians, Christians condemned the Aztec religion for its human sacrifice, and Catholics condemned Arians and Albigensians as heretics.

    The contemporary take on this question is altogether different. With the exception of some rabid atheists, most people—even those of no particular faith—have a positive view of religion. And Christians, especially, seem well-disposed to people of other faiths. Serious Christians are much more likely to be worried about the dangers inherent in secularism than the dangers posed by another religion. The current attitude seems to be that in the battle against secularism, people of faith—no matter what their faith—ought to stick together.