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Parenting - The Dr. Laura Program

18 Jan 2017 21:24 | Author: lazyswan327 | Category: Essay domestic animal dog

I am in an english class based around comics at Miami University and we would love to have a conversation with you if possible. Your work is very profoound and there is a lot to learn. I believe there is a lot of growth to be made on our end and you can deliver it through your niche medium. Email me please.

Love everything you create. Presented in such a way that even the most conservative, closed-minded person, is forced to reevaluate their views on drugs and and the failed war that’s been waged on our own citizens. Please keep doing what you’re doing so well. Really enjoyed all the band references in Rat Park as well. Top notch.

Comments
  1. author
    whitelion712 18 Jan 2017 01:30

    For more information, read my blog post My Drug Period : lessons learnt from researching War on Drugs & Rat Park

    Oh boy, becoming a regular patron is like getting high on herbs. Bet it is as addictive as drugs. What I mean to say is, I love your work and it really works on like drugs. I want more!

  2. author
    silvertiger861 18 Jan 2017 01:59

    Early life and education. Leary was born in Springfield, Massachusetts, the only child in an Irish Catholic household. His father, Timothy "Tote" Leary, was a dentist.

  3. author
    Surkov Dmitriy 18 Jan 2017 04:06

    First, can we be clear that there is not a war on drugs? There is a war on drug users, which is a little different. This is a war declared by our government on a minority of its own population. It is a war against people. The laws against drugs were instituted as a result of moral fervor, in an effort to protect people from potential addiction. Churches supported prohibition on doctrinal grounds and business felt it would make for a lazy workforce, and so a years long campaign to ban drugs was eventually successful. So, for a while, was the one on alcohol, but that was repealed. Drug laws have created two industries that make an indecent profit from prohibition. The first is those who produce and distribute the illegal drugs for many times more what they could hope to get in a rational market. The second is that of the legal profession. The lawyers, judges, clerks, guards, social workers, and police who depend on prohibition for their livelihood. Of the two, the most powerful is the latter. An end to prohibition would result in an end to the drug trade, and the violent crimes that grow out of the turf wars. It would also reduce property crimes, because reducing drug prices would proportionately reduce the amount an addict might steal to get high. It would enable drug users to seek medical help, and professionals to provide that help without fear of arrest, and allow us to treat the minority of recreational drug users who have problems for a fraction of the cost of enforcement. It would restore the faith of otherwise law abiding citizens in the credibility of their justice system, their government and their society. How much would that be worth? Without drug laws, there would of course be less for the legal professionals to do. The policemen can always detect real criminals, and the social workers can retrain as drug addiction counsellors, but I am afraid the judges, prosecutors and defenders will be forced to seek work elsewhere. Now your average taxpayer might think that wasn t such a bad thing, but your average taxpayer doesn t make and enforce the rules. The judges and the lawyers make the rules. So, to bring an end to the war on drugs all that we need is for the lawyers and judges to act for the common good, but against their own interests. I think I will roll another while I wait.

  4. author
    Take4@白猫等 18 Jan 2017 05:31

    For more information, read my blog post My Drug Period : lessons learnt from researching War on Drugs & Rat Park

    Oh boy, becoming a regular patron is like getting high on herbs. Bet it is as addictive as drugs. What I mean to say is, I love your work and it really works on like drugs. I want more!

    This video from hip hop legend Shawn “Jay Z” Carter and acclaimed artist Molly Crabapple depicts the drug war’s devastating impact on the Black community from decades of biased law enforcement.

    The video traces the drug war from President Nixon to the draconian Rockefeller Drug Laws to the emerging aboveground marijuana market that is poised to make legal millions for wealthy investors doing the same thing that generations of people of color have been arrested and locked up for.

  5. author
    Унылый A.R.M.Y 17 Jan 2017 23:43

    For more information, read my blog post My Drug Period : lessons learnt from researching War on Drugs & Rat Park

    Oh boy, becoming a regular patron is like getting high on herbs. Bet it is as addictive as drugs. What I mean to say is, I love your work and it really works on like drugs. I want more!

    This video from hip hop legend Shawn “Jay Z” Carter and acclaimed artist Molly Crabapple depicts the drug war’s devastating impact on the Black community from decades of biased law enforcement.

    The video traces the drug war from President Nixon to the draconian Rockefeller Drug Laws to the emerging aboveground marijuana market that is poised to make legal millions for wealthy investors doing the same thing that generations of people of color have been arrested and locked up for.

  6. author
    いなさ ゆう 🐔AНC5-26 18 Jan 2017 06:16

    For more information, read my blog post My Drug Period : lessons learnt from researching War on Drugs & Rat Park

    Oh boy, becoming a regular patron is like getting high on herbs. Bet it is as addictive as drugs. What I mean to say is, I love your work and it really works on like drugs. I want more!

    This video from hip hop legend Shawn “Jay Z” Carter and acclaimed artist Molly Crabapple depicts the drug war’s devastating impact on the Black community from decades of biased law enforcement.

    The video traces the drug war from President Nixon to the draconian Rockefeller Drug Laws to the emerging aboveground marijuana market that is poised to make legal millions for wealthy investors doing the same thing that generations of people of color have been arrested and locked up for.

    Former President Jimmy Carter, writing in a NYTimes op-ed, agreed with a Global Commission on Drug Policy that showed the current global War on Drugs to be a “total failure, espeically in the US.

  7. author
    Столица 24 18 Jan 2017 07:20

    It s impossible to win the way they are approaching it. I could win it, but it would be by legalizing pot. And I would legalize everything for a while to kill production profits. The make it illegal again when they started up, and work with the addicts to get off it. Soon there would be no profit in it. Plus people could grow their own pot or buy it from vendors, so there would be a need for that satisfied. If people could do pot legally and cheaply, that would probably cut demand for other drugs. I would manitorily test for anyone taking government money for any reason. I look at things in an unusual way, many don t understand, but usually my way works.

  8. author
    whitemeercat463 17 Jan 2017 22:01

    For more information, read my blog post My Drug Period : lessons learnt from researching War on Drugs & Rat Park

    Oh boy, becoming a regular patron is like getting high on herbs. Bet it is as addictive as drugs. What I mean to say is, I love your work and it really works on like drugs. I want more!

    This video from hip hop legend Shawn “Jay Z” Carter and acclaimed artist Molly Crabapple depicts the drug war’s devastating impact on the Black community from decades of biased law enforcement.

    The video traces the drug war from President Nixon to the draconian Rockefeller Drug Laws to the emerging aboveground marijuana market that is poised to make legal millions for wealthy investors doing the same thing that generations of people of color have been arrested and locked up for.

    Former President Jimmy Carter, writing in a NYTimes op-ed, agreed with a Global Commission on Drug Policy that showed the current global War on Drugs to be a “total failure, espeically in the US.

    In the first part of this essay we review the rise, effects and fall of national alcohol prohibition in the U.S. , and we examine the rationale and organization of the system of alcohol regulation instituted after repeal. We focus on lessons from the American experience with alcohol prohibition and alcohol regulation that might be useful for understanding drug prohibition and drug regulation.

    In the second part, we discuss the current world-wide system of drug prohibition. We focus on three crises or dilemmas that global drug prohibition now faces: the international harm reduction movement; the growing opposition, especially in Europe , to harsh drug policies; and the unstoppable use of cannabis throughout the world.

  9. author
    bigfrog661 18 Jan 2017 08:00

    Better yet, legalize all of it and take the profit motive out of being a drug dealer.