15

Will you please grammar check my essay?!?

18 Jan 2017 21:24 | Author: User1490025646 | Category: Free pictures of homework

The poem is an elegy to the speaker s recently deceased Captain , at once celebrating the safe and successful return of their ship and mourning the loss of its great leader. In the first stanza, the speaker expresses his relief that the ship has reached its home port at last and describes hearing people cheering. Despite the celebrations on land and the successful voyage, the speaker reveals that his Captain s dead body is lying on the deck. In the second stanza, the speaker implores the Captain to rise up and hear the bells, wishing the dead man could witness the elation. Everyone adored the captain, and the speaker admits that his death feels like a horrible dream. In the final stanza, the speaker juxtaposes his feelings of mourning and pride.

Whitman wrote this poem shortly after President Abraham Lincoln was assassinated. It is an extended metaphor intended to memorialize Lincoln s life and work. The Captain represents the assassinated president; the ship represents the war-weathered nation following the Civil War; the prize won represents the salvaged union. The speaker, torn between relief and despair, captures America s confusion at the end of the Civil War. It was a time of many conflicting sentiments, and Whitman immortalizes this sense of uncertainty in O Captain! My Captain!

Comments
  1. author
    User1489171208 18 Jan 2017 08:17

    Unicellular organisms have had as many eons of evolution as multicellular ones – and in fact, even more. Unicellular organisms were here when the earth was like the Wild Wild West – not all tame and stabilized at climax communities like it is now. I bet the multicells would have a hard time surviving under the conditions we faced! We are the pioneers, the originators of life on earth, and not only did we survive – we flourished! Furthermore, unicellular organisms can be far larger and more complex than any individual cell from a multicellular organism. Far from being “simple,” we are really complex organisms who should be considered “noncellular” rather than “unicellular,” We perform all the same functions as an entire multicellular organism – without needing to subdivide our bodies into separate cells like those clumsy metazoa. A cell for this and a cell for that – and even entire organs and systems for every little function! We do it all without being subdivided. Just consider our amazing pseudopods, our flowing cilia, our graceful flagella – and compare them to some kind of bear or hippo lumbering around unable to even eat without a gazillion cells it has to lug all over the place. To top it all off, we can live wonderful lives without any multicellular organisms at all on the whole planet – but you multis can’t say the same. You wouldn’t last to lunchtime without your white blood cells, for example. And we won’t even get into how we are holding the entire ecosystem in place – or what we do for the carbon cycle. I’d like to see the wooly mammoth or dinosaur who can say the same. Oh, wait – they’re extinct, aren’t they. Way to go, metazoa! Wipe yourselves out. Don’t worry – we’ll recycle you. When a beautiful, sleek, ergonomic paramecium – with its contractile vacuoles, its gullet, its pellicle, its micro AND macro nucleus, and all its other amazing features – sees a plain dumpy liver cell or some stratified squamous epithelium, it just wants to laugh and contract its vacuoles. Simple?!?! Pu-leeze! Gimme a break. (squirt) 344 words

  2. author
    greensnake913 17 Jan 2017 23:49

    COME my tan-faced children,
    Follow well in order, get your weapons ready,
    Have you your pistols? have you your sharp-edged axes?
    Pioneers! O pioneers!

    For we cannot tarry here,
    We must march my darlings, we must bear the brunt of danger,
    We the youthful sinewy races, all the rest on us depend,
    Pioneers! O pioneers!

    Whitman wrote this poem shortly after President Abraham Lincoln was assassinated. It is an extended metaphor intended to memorialize Lincoln s life and work. The Captain represents the assassinated president; the ship represents the war-weathered nation following the Civil War; the prize won represents the salvaged union. The speaker, torn between relief and despair, captures America s confusion at the end of the Civil War. It was a time of many conflicting sentiments, and Whitman immortalizes this sense of uncertainty in O Captain! My Captain!

    Walt Whitman: Poems study guide contains a biography of Walt Whitman, literature essays, a complete e-text, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis.

    In this poem, Whitman questions his own existence and the futility of life. He ponders the endless trains of the faithless, or the many people who, throughout his life, betray his expectations. He describes cities full of foolish people and reproaches himself for being no better than these faithless masses.

    He admits that his eyes vainly crave light and that he, like many others, always wants something better than what he has. He laments that things never turn out the way he wants them to, and observes the sordid crowds around him who are also fighting through the journey of life. He believes that he is intertwined with these people, spending just as many useless years in pursuit of a distant idea. At the end of the poem, he answers his own question—existence is enough of a purpose for humans to exist, and having life is reason enough for living.

    Published Works | In Whitman''s Hand | Life & Letters | Commentary | Resources | Pictures & Sound

    On the lookout for stock images of the American frontier? You know, covered wagons, cowboys, shootouts? Well, check out one of these films.

    But if you're looking for a story about the American West that really goes for the good stuff—the frontier way of life—then step right up to Willa Cather's 1913 novel, O Pioneers! By the end of this classic, you'll have an idea of the human experience on the frontier, in a drama that plays out between an unforgiving land and its tenacious settlers.

  3. author
    User1488548320 18 Jan 2017 01:33

    COME my tan-faced children,
    Follow well in order, get your weapons ready,
    Have you your pistols? have you your sharp-edged axes?
    Pioneers! O pioneers!

    For we cannot tarry here,
    We must march my darlings, we must bear the brunt of danger,
    We the youthful sinewy races, all the rest on us depend,
    Pioneers! O pioneers!

  4. author
    yellowwolf683 17 Jan 2017 22:20

    This 50 year old Eve, staying in a motel, has an epiphany. She has much to give and is vitally alive. Though boxed in like the apple tree she too has fruit to give.

  5. author
    без ☹ɐwʎ 18 Jan 2017 03:48

    COME my tan-faced children,
    Follow well in order, get your weapons ready,
    Have you your pistols? have you your sharp-edged axes?
    Pioneers! O pioneers!

    For we cannot tarry here,
    We must march my darlings, we must bear the brunt of danger,
    We the youthful sinewy races, all the rest on us depend,
    Pioneers! O pioneers!

    Whitman wrote this poem shortly after President Abraham Lincoln was assassinated. It is an extended metaphor intended to memorialize Lincoln s life and work. The Captain represents the assassinated president; the ship represents the war-weathered nation following the Civil War; the prize won represents the salvaged union. The speaker, torn between relief and despair, captures America s confusion at the end of the Civil War. It was a time of many conflicting sentiments, and Whitman immortalizes this sense of uncertainty in O Captain! My Captain!

    Walt Whitman: Poems study guide contains a biography of Walt Whitman, literature essays, a complete e-text, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis.

  6. author
    heavyfrog681 18 Jan 2017 02:34

    COME my tan-faced children,
    Follow well in order, get your weapons ready,
    Have you your pistols? have you your sharp-edged axes?
    Pioneers! O pioneers!

    For we cannot tarry here,
    We must march my darlings, we must bear the brunt of danger,
    We the youthful sinewy races, all the rest on us depend,
    Pioneers! O pioneers!

    Whitman wrote this poem shortly after President Abraham Lincoln was assassinated. It is an extended metaphor intended to memorialize Lincoln s life and work. The Captain represents the assassinated president; the ship represents the war-weathered nation following the Civil War; the prize won represents the salvaged union. The speaker, torn between relief and despair, captures America s confusion at the end of the Civil War. It was a time of many conflicting sentiments, and Whitman immortalizes this sense of uncertainty in O Captain! My Captain!

    Walt Whitman: Poems study guide contains a biography of Walt Whitman, literature essays, a complete e-text, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis.

    In this poem, Whitman questions his own existence and the futility of life. He ponders the endless trains of the faithless, or the many people who, throughout his life, betray his expectations. He describes cities full of foolish people and reproaches himself for being no better than these faithless masses.

    He admits that his eyes vainly crave light and that he, like many others, always wants something better than what he has. He laments that things never turn out the way he wants them to, and observes the sordid crowds around him who are also fighting through the journey of life. He believes that he is intertwined with these people, spending just as many useless years in pursuit of a distant idea. At the end of the poem, he answers his own question—existence is enough of a purpose for humans to exist, and having life is reason enough for living.

    Published Works | In Whitman's Hand | Life & Letters | Commentary | Resources | Pictures & Sound

  7. author
    Outhediter 18 Jan 2017 04:42

    COME my tan-faced children,
    Follow well in order, get your weapons ready,
    Have you your pistols? have you your sharp-edged axes?
    Pioneers! O pioneers!

    For we cannot tarry here,
    We must march my darlings, we must bear the brunt of danger,
    We the youthful sinewy races, all the rest on us depend,
    Pioneers! O pioneers!

    Whitman wrote this poem shortly after President Abraham Lincoln was assassinated. It is an extended metaphor intended to memorialize Lincoln s life and work. The Captain represents the assassinated president; the ship represents the war-weathered nation following the Civil War; the prize won represents the salvaged union. The speaker, torn between relief and despair, captures America s confusion at the end of the Civil War. It was a time of many conflicting sentiments, and Whitman immortalizes this sense of uncertainty in O Captain! My Captain!

    Walt Whitman: Poems study guide contains a biography of Walt Whitman, literature essays, a complete e-text, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis.

    In this poem, Whitman questions his own existence and the futility of life. He ponders the endless trains of the faithless, or the many people who, throughout his life, betray his expectations. He describes cities full of foolish people and reproaches himself for being no better than these faithless masses.

    He admits that his eyes vainly crave light and that he, like many others, always wants something better than what he has. He laments that things never turn out the way he wants them to, and observes the sordid crowds around him who are also fighting through the journey of life. He believes that he is intertwined with these people, spending just as many useless years in pursuit of a distant idea. At the end of the poem, he answers his own question—existence is enough of a purpose for humans to exist, and having life is reason enough for living.

    Published Works | In Whitman''''s Hand | Life & Letters | Commentary | Resources | Pictures & Sound

    On the lookout for stock images of the American frontier? You know, covered wagons, cowboys, shootouts? Well, check out one of these films.

    But if you''re looking for a story about the American West that really goes for the good stuff—the frontier way of life—then step right up to Willa Cather''s 1913 novel, O Pioneers! By the end of this classic, you''ll have an idea of the human experience on the frontier, in a drama that plays out between an unforgiving land and its tenacious settlers.

  8. author
    User1489002012 18 Jan 2017 07:16

    Click here pioneers o pioneers walt whitman essay

    The poem is an elegy to the speaker s recently deceased Captain , at once celebrating the safe and successful return of their ship and mourning the loss of its great leader. In the first stanza, the speaker expresses his relief that the ship has reached its home port at last and describes hearing people cheering. Despite the celebrations on land and the successful voyage, the speaker reveals that his Captain s dead body is lying on the deck. In the second stanza, the speaker implores the Captain to rise up and hear the bells, wishing the dead man could witness the elation. Everyone adored the captain, and the speaker admits that his death feels like a horrible dream. In the final stanza, the speaker juxtaposes his feelings of mourning and pride.

    Whitman wrote this poem shortly after President Abraham Lincoln was assassinated. It is an extended metaphor intended to memorialize Lincoln s life and work. The Captain represents the assassinated president; the ship represents the war-weathered nation following the Civil War; the prize won represents the salvaged union. The speaker, torn between relief and despair, captures America s confusion at the end of the Civil War. It was a time of many conflicting sentiments, and Whitman immortalizes this sense of uncertainty in O Captain! My Captain!

  9. author
    goldenbutterfly430 17 Jan 2017 22:03

    COME my tan-faced children,
    Follow well in order, get your weapons ready,
    Have you your pistols? have you your sharp-edged axes?
    Pioneers! O pioneers!

    For we cannot tarry here,
    We must march my darlings, we must bear the brunt of danger,
    We the youthful sinewy races, all the rest on us depend,
    Pioneers! O pioneers!

    Whitman wrote this poem shortly after President Abraham Lincoln was assassinated. It is an extended metaphor intended to memorialize Lincoln s life and work. The Captain represents the assassinated president; the ship represents the war-weathered nation following the Civil War; the prize won represents the salvaged union. The speaker, torn between relief and despair, captures America s confusion at the end of the Civil War. It was a time of many conflicting sentiments, and Whitman immortalizes this sense of uncertainty in O Captain! My Captain!

    Walt Whitman: Poems study guide contains a biography of Walt Whitman, literature essays, a complete e-text, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis.

    In this poem, Whitman questions his own existence and the futility of life. He ponders the endless trains of the faithless, or the many people who, throughout his life, betray his expectations. He describes cities full of foolish people and reproaches himself for being no better than these faithless masses.

    He admits that his eyes vainly crave light and that he, like many others, always wants something better than what he has. He laments that things never turn out the way he wants them to, and observes the sordid crowds around him who are also fighting through the journey of life. He believes that he is intertwined with these people, spending just as many useless years in pursuit of a distant idea. At the end of the poem, he answers his own question—existence is enough of a purpose for humans to exist, and having life is reason enough for living.

    Published Works | In Whitman''''''''s Hand | Life & Letters | Commentary | Resources | Pictures & Sound

    On the lookout for stock images of the American frontier? You know, covered wagons, cowboys, shootouts? Well, check out one of these films.

    But if you''''re looking for a story about the American West that really goes for the good stuff—the frontier way of life—then step right up to Willa Cather''''s 1913 novel, O Pioneers! By the end of this classic, you''''ll have an idea of the human experience on the frontier, in a drama that plays out between an unforgiving land and its tenacious settlers.

    Leaves of Grass is a poetry collection by the American poet Walt Whitman (1819–1892). Though the first edition was published in 1855, Whitman spent most of his professional life writing and re-writing Leaves of Grass , [1] revising it multiple times until his death. This resulted in vastly different editions over four decades—the first a small book of twelve poems and the last a compilation of over 400.

    With one exception, the poems do not rhyme or follow standard rules for meter and line length. Among the poems in the collection are " Song of Myself ", " I Sing the Body Electric ", " Out of the Cradle Endlessly Rocking ". Later editions included Whitman's elegy to the assassinated President Abraham Lincoln , " When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd ".

  10. author
    ticklishswan506 17 Jan 2017 22:10

    i know this question is about improving it, but it sounds pretty darned smart to me. we re doing a research paper too. good luck!

  11. author
    User1487964034 18 Jan 2017 03:56

    COME my tan-faced children,
    Follow well in order, get your weapons ready,
    Have you your pistols? have you your sharp-edged axes?
    Pioneers! O pioneers!

    For we cannot tarry here,
    We must march my darlings, we must bear the brunt of danger,
    We the youthful sinewy races, all the rest on us depend,
    Pioneers! O pioneers!

    Whitman wrote this poem shortly after President Abraham Lincoln was assassinated. It is an extended metaphor intended to memorialize Lincoln s life and work. The Captain represents the assassinated president; the ship represents the war-weathered nation following the Civil War; the prize won represents the salvaged union. The speaker, torn between relief and despair, captures America s confusion at the end of the Civil War. It was a time of many conflicting sentiments, and Whitman immortalizes this sense of uncertainty in O Captain! My Captain!

    Walt Whitman: Poems study guide contains a biography of Walt Whitman, literature essays, a complete e-text, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis.

    In this poem, Whitman questions his own existence and the futility of life. He ponders the endless trains of the faithless, or the many people who, throughout his life, betray his expectations. He describes cities full of foolish people and reproaches himself for being no better than these faithless masses.

    He admits that his eyes vainly crave light and that he, like many others, always wants something better than what he has. He laments that things never turn out the way he wants them to, and observes the sordid crowds around him who are also fighting through the journey of life. He believes that he is intertwined with these people, spending just as many useless years in pursuit of a distant idea. At the end of the poem, he answers his own question—existence is enough of a purpose for humans to exist, and having life is reason enough for living.

    Published Works | In Whitman''''''''''''''''s Hand | Life & Letters | Commentary | Resources | Pictures & Sound

    On the lookout for stock images of the American frontier? You know, covered wagons, cowboys, shootouts? Well, check out one of these films.

    But if you''''''''re looking for a story about the American West that really goes for the good stuff—the frontier way of life—then step right up to Willa Cather''''''''s 1913 novel, O Pioneers! By the end of this classic, you''''''''ll have an idea of the human experience on the frontier, in a drama that plays out between an unforgiving land and its tenacious settlers.

    Leaves of Grass is a poetry collection by the American poet Walt Whitman (1819–1892). Though the first edition was published in 1855, Whitman spent most of his professional life writing and re-writing Leaves of Grass , [1] revising it multiple times until his death. This resulted in vastly different editions over four decades—the first a small book of twelve poems and the last a compilation of over 400.

    With one exception, the poems do not rhyme or follow standard rules for meter and line length. Among the poems in the collection are " Song of Myself ", " I Sing the Body Electric ", " Out of the Cradle Endlessly Rocking ". Later editions included Whitman''s elegy to the assassinated President Abraham Lincoln , " When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom''d ".

    " When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd " is a long poem in the form of an elegy written by American poet Walt Whitman (1819–1892) in 1865.

    Although Whitman did not consider the poem to be among his best works, it is compared in both effect and quality to several acclaimed works of English literature, including elegies such as John Milton ' s Lycidas (1637) and Percy Bysshe Shelley ' s Adonaïs (1821).

  12. author
    organicmeercat242 18 Jan 2017 03:34

    COME my tan-faced children,
    Follow well in order, get your weapons ready,
    Have you your pistols? have you your sharp-edged axes?
    Pioneers! O pioneers!

    For we cannot tarry here,
    We must march my darlings, we must bear the brunt of danger,
    We the youthful sinewy races, all the rest on us depend,
    Pioneers! O pioneers!

    Whitman wrote this poem shortly after President Abraham Lincoln was assassinated. It is an extended metaphor intended to memorialize Lincoln s life and work. The Captain represents the assassinated president; the ship represents the war-weathered nation following the Civil War; the prize won represents the salvaged union. The speaker, torn between relief and despair, captures America s confusion at the end of the Civil War. It was a time of many conflicting sentiments, and Whitman immortalizes this sense of uncertainty in O Captain! My Captain!

    Walt Whitman: Poems study guide contains a biography of Walt Whitman, literature essays, a complete e-text, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis.

    In this poem, Whitman questions his own existence and the futility of life. He ponders the endless trains of the faithless, or the many people who, throughout his life, betray his expectations. He describes cities full of foolish people and reproaches himself for being no better than these faithless masses.

    He admits that his eyes vainly crave light and that he, like many others, always wants something better than what he has. He laments that things never turn out the way he wants them to, and observes the sordid crowds around him who are also fighting through the journey of life. He believes that he is intertwined with these people, spending just as many useless years in pursuit of a distant idea. At the end of the poem, he answers his own question—existence is enough of a purpose for humans to exist, and having life is reason enough for living.

  13. author
    User1489228537 18 Jan 2017 05:46

    Walt Whitman. Biography of Walt Whitman and a searchable collection of works.

  14. author
    bluesnake448 18 Jan 2017 06:27

    COME my tan-faced children,
    Follow well in order, get your weapons ready,
    Have you your pistols? have you your sharp-edged axes?
    Pioneers! O pioneers!

    For we cannot tarry here,
    We must march my darlings, we must bear the brunt of danger,
    We the youthful sinewy races, all the rest on us depend,
    Pioneers! O pioneers!

    Whitman wrote this poem shortly after President Abraham Lincoln was assassinated. It is an extended metaphor intended to memorialize Lincoln s life and work. The Captain represents the assassinated president; the ship represents the war-weathered nation following the Civil War; the prize won represents the salvaged union. The speaker, torn between relief and despair, captures America s confusion at the end of the Civil War. It was a time of many conflicting sentiments, and Whitman immortalizes this sense of uncertainty in O Captain! My Captain!

    Walt Whitman: Poems study guide contains a biography of Walt Whitman, literature essays, a complete e-text, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis.

    In this poem, Whitman questions his own existence and the futility of life. He ponders the endless trains of the faithless, or the many people who, throughout his life, betray his expectations. He describes cities full of foolish people and reproaches himself for being no better than these faithless masses.

    He admits that his eyes vainly crave light and that he, like many others, always wants something better than what he has. He laments that things never turn out the way he wants them to, and observes the sordid crowds around him who are also fighting through the journey of life. He believes that he is intertwined with these people, spending just as many useless years in pursuit of a distant idea. At the end of the poem, he answers his own question—existence is enough of a purpose for humans to exist, and having life is reason enough for living.

    Published Works | In Whitman''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s Hand | Life & Letters | Commentary | Resources | Pictures & Sound

    On the lookout for stock images of the American frontier? You know, covered wagons, cowboys, shootouts? Well, check out one of these films.

    But if you''''''''''''''''re looking for a story about the American West that really goes for the good stuff—the frontier way of life—then step right up to Willa Cather''''''''''''''''s 1913 novel, O Pioneers! By the end of this classic, you''''''''''''''''ll have an idea of the human experience on the frontier, in a drama that plays out between an unforgiving land and its tenacious settlers.

    Leaves of Grass is a poetry collection by the American poet Walt Whitman (1819–1892). Though the first edition was published in 1855, Whitman spent most of his professional life writing and re-writing Leaves of Grass , [1] revising it multiple times until his death. This resulted in vastly different editions over four decades—the first a small book of twelve poems and the last a compilation of over 400.

    With one exception, the poems do not rhyme or follow standard rules for meter and line length. Among the poems in the collection are " Song of Myself ", " I Sing the Body Electric ", " Out of the Cradle Endlessly Rocking ". Later editions included Whitman''''s elegy to the assassinated President Abraham Lincoln , " When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom''''d ".

    " When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom''d " is a long poem in the form of an elegy written by American poet Walt Whitman (1819–1892) in 1865.

    Although Whitman did not consider the poem to be among his best works, it is compared in both effect and quality to several acclaimed works of English literature, including elegies such as John Milton '' s Lycidas (1637) and Percy Bysshe Shelley '' s Adonaïs (1821).

    Did you know that you can help us produce ebooks by proof-reading just one page a day? Go to: Distributed Proofreaders

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