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the picture of Dorian Gray?

18 Jan 2017 21:24 | Author: User1489846820 | Category: Church turing thesis artificial intelligence

“Don’t spoil him,” Basil begs Lord Henry just before introducing him to Dorian. “Don’t try to influence him. Your influence would be bad.” But influence is what Lord Henry does best and what he enjoys most; inevitably, his charm, wit, and intellect hold tremendous sway over the impressionable Dorian. This influence, as Basil foresees, is primarily negative if Dorian is like Faust, the fictional character who sells his soul for knowledge, then Lord Henry is something of a Mephistopheles, the devil who tempts Faust into the bargain. Lord Henry is a cynical aesthete, a lover of beauty with a contempt for conventional morality, and he views Dorian as a disciple with the potential to live out his philosophy of hedonism.

One must not overstate Lord Henry’s role as a villain, however. Indeed, above all else, Lord Henry prizes individualism, which allows one to live one’s life boldly, freely, and according to one’s own edicts. Because Dorian so willingly assumes the role of disciple, the real source of his downfall rests in his willingness to sacrifice himself to another’s vision. Following Lord Henry’s advice and influenced by the “yellow book” that Lord Henry gives him, Dorian gradually allows himself to fall deep into a life of sin, all in the name of pursuing pleasure which, according to Lord Henry, is the highest good. But, significantly, Lord Henry himself never seems to stray from the straight and narrow: he shocks cocktail guests with his ideas but never puts them into practice himself. He is a thinker, not a doer, and by the end of the novel, he seems curiously naïve about where his philosophy, if put into action, would lead him. Unwilling (or unable) to see the effects of his philosophy, he continues to champion his ideas even after they have ruined his protégé’s life.

Comments
  1. author
    whitewolf994 17 Jan 2017 22:23

    Lord Henry tried to protect Dorian after Dorian ran over Myrtle and Daisy Buchanan threatened to tell everyone what Dorian did, after he confided to her about his crime. Dorian didn't believe Lord Henry's involvement was necessary and he felt sadness that he got him involved and his eventual social demise. So, yes, Dorian feels responsible but the reality is the type of people he was around was the biggest problem and probably could not have been avoided.

  2. author
    blackelephant607 17 Jan 2017 22:19

    A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

    Novelguide.com is the premier free source for literary analysis on the web. We provide an educational supplement for better understanding of classic and contemporary literature. Novelguide.com is continually in the process of adding more books to the website each week. Please check back weekly to see what we have added. Please let us know if you have any suggestions or comments or would like any additional information. Thanks for checking out our website. More Details

    In the end of the book, when Dorian stabs his cursed picture: Does it mean his soul is pure again, for his dead body now endures his age and sins while the picture that represented his soul is young again, or it's just about his curse being broken?

    First of all, there are only 3 important characters in this book. They probably either represent the id, the ego, and the superego (obviously Lord Henry being the id, Dorian Gray being the ego, and Basil being the superego) or represent Dorian as a normal person with Lord Henry as the devil and Basil the voice of reason. I can't believe you're not even going to discuss this possibility at all!

  3. author
    User1488937477 18 Jan 2017 03:09

    Lord Henry does not bear full responsibility, but he does bear a good bit of it. Before Dorian met Henry, he was innocent and good. Henry filled Dorian's mind with harmful ideas. However, Basil listened to Henry and never turned bad. Dorian must have been somewhat weak. In the same way, Dorian is only partly to blame for the ruin of his friends. He is fully responsible for the death of Basil, but with Sybil.just mostly responsible. Dorian should not have been so careless and fickle, but Sybil could have handled it better. She let her emotions take control. She, too, was weak.

  4. author
    tinyfish513 18 Jan 2017 08:54

    Click here picture of dorian gray essay questions

    “Don’t spoil him,” Basil begs Lord Henry just before introducing him to Dorian. “Don’t try to influence him. Your influence would be bad.” But influence is what Lord Henry does best and what he enjoys most; inevitably, his charm, wit, and intellect hold tremendous sway over the impressionable Dorian. This influence, as Basil foresees, is primarily negative if Dorian is like Faust, the fictional character who sells his soul for knowledge, then Lord Henry is something of a Mephistopheles, the devil who tempts Faust into the bargain. Lord Henry is a cynical aesthete, a lover of beauty with a contempt for conventional morality, and he views Dorian as a disciple with the potential to live out his philosophy of hedonism.

    One must not overstate Lord Henry’s role as a villain, however. Indeed, above all else, Lord Henry prizes individualism, which allows one to live one’s life boldly, freely, and according to one’s own edicts. Because Dorian so willingly assumes the role of disciple, the real source of his downfall rests in his willingness to sacrifice himself to another’s vision. Following Lord Henry’s advice and influenced by the “yellow book” that Lord Henry gives him, Dorian gradually allows himself to fall deep into a life of sin, all in the name of pursuing pleasure which, according to Lord Henry, is the highest good. But, significantly, Lord Henry himself never seems to stray from the straight and narrow: he shocks cocktail guests with his ideas but never puts them into practice himself. He is a thinker, not a doer, and by the end of the novel, he seems curiously naïve about where his philosophy, if put into action, would lead him. Unwilling (or unable) to see the effects of his philosophy, he continues to champion his ideas even after they have ruined his protégé’s life.

  5. author
    User1488997309 18 Jan 2017 03:45

    A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

    Novelguide.com is the premier free source for literary analysis on the web. We provide an educational supplement for better understanding of classic and contemporary literature. Novelguide.com is continually in the process of adding more books to the website each week. Please check back weekly to see what we have added. Please let us know if you have any suggestions or comments or would like any additional information. Thanks for checking out our website. More Details

    In the end of the book, when Dorian stabs his cursed picture: Does it mean his soul is pure again, for his dead body now endures his age and sins while the picture that represented his soul is young again, or it''''s just about his curse being broken?

    First of all, there are only 3 important characters in this book. They probably either represent the id, the ego, and the superego (obviously Lord Henry being the id, Dorian Gray being the ego, and Basil being the superego) or represent Dorian as a normal person with Lord Henry as the devil and Basil the voice of reason. I can''''t believe you''''re not even going to discuss this possibility at all!

  6. author
    blackgorilla427 18 Jan 2017 08:54

    A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

    Novelguide.com is the premier free source for literary analysis on the web. We provide an educational supplement for better understanding of classic and contemporary literature. Novelguide.com is continually in the process of adding more books to the website each week. Please check back weekly to see what we have added. Please let us know if you have any suggestions or comments or would like any additional information. Thanks for checking out our website. More Details

    In the end of the book, when Dorian stabs his cursed picture: Does it mean his soul is pure again, for his dead body now endures his age and sins while the picture that represented his soul is young again, or it''s just about his curse being broken?

    First of all, there are only 3 important characters in this book. They probably either represent the id, the ego, and the superego (obviously Lord Henry being the id, Dorian Gray being the ego, and Basil being the superego) or represent Dorian as a normal person with Lord Henry as the devil and Basil the voice of reason. I can''t believe you''re not even going to discuss this possibility at all!

  7. author
    smallbird247 17 Jan 2017 22:42

    A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

    Novelguide.com is the premier free source for literary analysis on the web. We provide an educational supplement for better understanding of classic and contemporary literature. Novelguide.com is continually in the process of adding more books to the website each week. Please check back weekly to see what we have added. Please let us know if you have any suggestions or comments or would like any additional information. Thanks for checking out our website. More Details

    In the end of the book, when Dorian stabs his cursed picture: Does it mean his soul is pure again, for his dead body now endures his age and sins while the picture that represented his soul is young again, or it''''''''s just about his curse being broken?

    First of all, there are only 3 important characters in this book. They probably either represent the id, the ego, and the superego (obviously Lord Henry being the id, Dorian Gray being the ego, and Basil being the superego) or represent Dorian as a normal person with Lord Henry as the devil and Basil the voice of reason. I can''''''''t believe you''''''''re not even going to discuss this possibility at all!

    In the end of the book, when Dorian stabs his cursed picture: Does it mean his soul is pure again, for his dead body now endures his age and sins while the picture that represented his soul is young again, or it's just about his curse being broken?

    First of all, there are only 3 important characters in this book. They probably either represent the id, the ego, and the superego (obviously Lord Henry being the id, Dorian Gray being the ego, and Basil being the superego) or represent Dorian as a normal person with Lord Henry as the devil and Basil the voice of reason. I can't believe you're not even going to discuss this possibility at all!

  8. author
    heavysnake768 18 Jan 2017 07:54

    A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

    Novelguide.com is the premier free source for literary analysis on the web. We provide an educational supplement for better understanding of classic and contemporary literature. Novelguide.com is continually in the process of adding more books to the website each week. Please check back weekly to see what we have added. Please let us know if you have any suggestions or comments or would like any additional information. Thanks for checking out our website. More Details

    In the end of the book, when Dorian stabs his cursed picture: Does it mean his soul is pure again, for his dead body now endures his age and sins while the picture that represented his soul is young again, or it''''''''''''''''s just about his curse being broken?

    First of all, there are only 3 important characters in this book. They probably either represent the id, the ego, and the superego (obviously Lord Henry being the id, Dorian Gray being the ego, and Basil being the superego) or represent Dorian as a normal person with Lord Henry as the devil and Basil the voice of reason. I can''''''''''''''''t believe you''''''''''''''''re not even going to discuss this possibility at all!

    In the end of the book, when Dorian stabs his cursed picture: Does it mean his soul is pure again, for his dead body now endures his age and sins while the picture that represented his soul is young again, or it''s just about his curse being broken?

    First of all, there are only 3 important characters in this book. They probably either represent the id, the ego, and the superego (obviously Lord Henry being the id, Dorian Gray being the ego, and Basil being the superego) or represent Dorian as a normal person with Lord Henry as the devil and Basil the voice of reason. I can''t believe you''re not even going to discuss this possibility at all!

    Chapman was extolling the virutes of English common sense.. while sitting next to Dorian and being aware of the young man's actions... the statement was quite ludicrous. Thus, it made him smile.

    Basil is a reclusive painter much respected by the London aristocracy. He admires Dorian to the point of adulation and paints many portraits of him, finally creating his masterpiece, the titular picture. Basil introduces Dorian to Lord Henry.

  9. author
    Х.Халиун 18 Jan 2017 04:58

    ok, it fairly is been a loooong time for the reason that I examine this e book so i m basically going to shoot an thought off and you will decide for if it works. From what I undergo in thoughts Dorian replaced into prepared approximately holding an entire life of delight, attractiveness and colourful youngsters. That obsession is what "created" the portray curse interior the 1st place. So perhaps by skill of putting the colour "gray" interior the call the author meant to instruct the reader Dorian s real "shade". He could have been given the present of youngsters and a colourful existence of delight and yet his very call shows that each and every person isn t beautifal approximately this guy. gray is the colour of ailment, loss of blood/existence, or perhaps death. It represents a loss of existence once you talk of a guy or woman s pores and skin tone. in an attempt to sum up my wager: perhaps the author meant to foreshadow Dorian s destiny by skill of exhibiting us on the very initiating that he replaced into "gray". in spite of if he replaced into waiting to stay a existence packed with existence, attractiveness and flashy colorings on the exterior, on the interior he replaced into rather a death, depressing, terrible guy. His blouse could have been a cheery crimson yet his heart replaced into rather a sickly shade of gray.

  10. author
    yellowmouse430 18 Jan 2017 02:38

    A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

    Novelguide.com is the premier free source for literary analysis on the web. We provide an educational supplement for better understanding of classic and contemporary literature. Novelguide.com is continually in the process of adding more books to the website each week. Please check back weekly to see what we have added. Please let us know if you have any suggestions or comments or would like any additional information. Thanks for checking out our website. More Details

    In the end of the book, when Dorian stabs his cursed picture: Does it mean his soul is pure again, for his dead body now endures his age and sins while the picture that represented his soul is young again, or it''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s just about his curse being broken?

    First of all, there are only 3 important characters in this book. They probably either represent the id, the ego, and the superego (obviously Lord Henry being the id, Dorian Gray being the ego, and Basil being the superego) or represent Dorian as a normal person with Lord Henry as the devil and Basil the voice of reason. I can''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t believe you''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''re not even going to discuss this possibility at all!

    In the end of the book, when Dorian stabs his cursed picture: Does it mean his soul is pure again, for his dead body now endures his age and sins while the picture that represented his soul is young again, or it''''s just about his curse being broken?

    First of all, there are only 3 important characters in this book. They probably either represent the id, the ego, and the superego (obviously Lord Henry being the id, Dorian Gray being the ego, and Basil being the superego) or represent Dorian as a normal person with Lord Henry as the devil and Basil the voice of reason. I can''''t believe you''''re not even going to discuss this possibility at all!

    Chapman was extolling the virutes of English common sense.. while sitting next to Dorian and being aware of the young man''s actions. the statement was quite ludicrous. Thus, it made him smile.

    Basil is a reclusive painter much respected by the London aristocracy. He admires Dorian to the point of adulation and paints many portraits of him, finally creating his masterpiece, the titular picture. Basil introduces Dorian to Lord Henry.