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18 Jan 2017 21:24 | Author: Н // | Category: Lake region electric cooperative essay contest

SparkNotes: The Catcher in the Rye. From a general summary to chapter summaries to explanations of famous quotes, the SparkNotes The Catcher in the Rye Study Guide.

Comments
  1. author
    Russian Imperialist 18 Jan 2017 01:03

    William Delaney | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

    In Chapter 9, Holden is extremely phony with Faith Cavendish when he calls her at a very late hour. He pretends to be a mutual friend of somebody named Eddie Birdsell and implies that he is a Princeton student. He pretends to be older than sixteen, as he does throughout the novel. There is no doubt that Holden does a lot of lying and misrepresenting.

    If an adult has every gotten on your case about uptalk, vocal fry , or saying “like” all the time, you get the point of Catcher in the Rye —you and Holden might say different things in different ways, but you both speak the same language: teenager. Holden’s style (which is the book’s style) is colloquial and slangy, sounding a lot more like a real seventeen-year-old talking straight to you than an accomplished adult author.

    Some examples? He says things like "You''''d have liked [Allie]" to give the illusion that he’s right there talking at you. He uses italics to make the words read with the same emphasis as spoken word ("He''''s my brother and all"). You''''ll hear him describe places and people all the time as "corny" or "phony." He''''ll tell us he''''s never waited anywhere so long in his "goddamn life. [He] swear[s]" (24. 97), or that he''''s sweating "like a bastard" (24.100).

  2. author
    супчик мисо 18 Jan 2017 07:12

    William Delaney | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

    In Chapter 9, Holden is extremely phony with Faith Cavendish when he calls her at a very late hour. He pretends to be a mutual friend of somebody named Eddie Birdsell and implies that he is a Princeton student. He pretends to be older than sixteen, as he does throughout the novel. There is no doubt that Holden does a lot of lying and misrepresenting.

    If an adult has every gotten on your case about uptalk, vocal fry , or saying “like” all the time, you get the point of Catcher in the Rye —you and Holden might say different things in different ways, but you both speak the same language: teenager. Holden’s style (which is the book’s style) is colloquial and slangy, sounding a lot more like a real seventeen-year-old talking straight to you than an accomplished adult author.

    Some examples? He says things like "You''''''''d have liked [Allie]" to give the illusion that he’s right there talking at you. He uses italics to make the words read with the same emphasis as spoken word ("He''''''''s my brother and all"). You''''''''ll hear him describe places and people all the time as "corny" or "phony." He''''''''ll tell us he''''''''s never waited anywhere so long in his "goddamn life. [He] swear[s]" (24. 97), or that he''''''''s sweating "like a bastard" (24.100).

  3. author
    Aleksa Kuz 18 Jan 2017 04:29

    William Delaney | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

    In Chapter 9, Holden is extremely phony with Faith Cavendish when he calls her at a very late hour. He pretends to be a mutual friend of somebody named Eddie Birdsell and implies that he is a Princeton student. He pretends to be older than sixteen, as he does throughout the novel. There is no doubt that Holden does a lot of lying and misrepresenting.

    If an adult has every gotten on your case about uptalk, vocal fry , or saying “like” all the time, you get the point of Catcher in the Rye —you and Holden might say different things in different ways, but you both speak the same language: teenager. Holden’s style (which is the book’s style) is colloquial and slangy, sounding a lot more like a real seventeen-year-old talking straight to you than an accomplished adult author.

    Some examples? He says things like "You''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''d have liked [Allie]" to give the illusion that he’s right there talking at you. He uses italics to make the words read with the same emphasis as spoken word ("He''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s my brother and all"). You''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''ll hear him describe places and people all the time as "corny" or "phony." He''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''ll tell us he''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s never waited anywhere so long in his "goddamn life. [He] swear[s]" (24. 97), or that he''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s sweating "like a bastard" (24.100).

    Holden, it seems, is in the throes of an existential crisis. To a great degree he is numb to the pains and joys of life. Unable to come to terms with his brother s death, he has no one to show him the kind of parental or brotherly love that he himself gave Allie. Whenever someone does end up showing him even a hint of such love (such as Mr. Antolini ), Holden ends up being disappointed.

    Holden might see some romance in suicide and some comfort in the idea that it ends internal pain, but death does seem worse, the ultimate loneliness. He seen the effects of death on the living as well. He thus cannot do to Phoebe what Allie has done to them already.

    Although J.D. Salinger has written many short stories, The Catcher in the Rye is Salinger s only novel and his most notable work, earning him great fame and admiration as a writer and sparking many high school students interest in great literature. The protagonist s adventures and concerns about phony people engage readers young and old.

    The novel draws on characters and themes that appeared in a number of Salinger s earlier short stories, some of which form the basis for individual chapters in The Catcher in the Rye. Indeed, the Caulfield family is the subject of two of Salinger s major stories, This Sandwich Has No Mayonnaise and I m Crazy, as well as a number of unpublished works.

  4. author
    redmeercat775 18 Jan 2017 08:36

  5. author
    bigfish401 18 Jan 2017 00:14

    William Delaney | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

    In Chapter 9, Holden is extremely phony with Faith Cavendish when he calls her at a very late hour. He pretends to be a mutual friend of somebody named Eddie Birdsell and implies that he is a Princeton student. He pretends to be older than sixteen, as he does throughout the novel. There is no doubt that Holden does a lot of lying and misrepresenting.

    If an adult has every gotten on your case about uptalk, vocal fry , or saying “like” all the time, you get the point of Catcher in the Rye —you and Holden might say different things in different ways, but you both speak the same language: teenager. Holden’s style (which is the book’s style) is colloquial and slangy, sounding a lot more like a real seventeen-year-old talking straight to you than an accomplished adult author.

    Some examples? He says things like "You''''''''''''''''d have liked [Allie]" to give the illusion that he’s right there talking at you. He uses italics to make the words read with the same emphasis as spoken word ("He''''''''''''''''s my brother and all"). You''''''''''''''''ll hear him describe places and people all the time as "corny" or "phony." He''''''''''''''''ll tell us he''''''''''''''''s never waited anywhere so long in his "goddamn life. [He] swear[s]" (24. 97), or that he''''''''''''''''s sweating "like a bastard" (24.100).

  6. author
    Lumpenstilzchen 18 Jan 2017 05:17

    William Delaney | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

    In Chapter 9, Holden is extremely phony with Faith Cavendish when he calls her at a very late hour. He pretends to be a mutual friend of somebody named Eddie Birdsell and implies that he is a Princeton student. He pretends to be older than sixteen, as he does throughout the novel. There is no doubt that Holden does a lot of lying and misrepresenting.

    If an adult has every gotten on your case about uptalk, vocal fry , or saying “like” all the time, you get the point of Catcher in the Rye —you and Holden might say different things in different ways, but you both speak the same language: teenager. Holden’s style (which is the book’s style) is colloquial and slangy, sounding a lot more like a real seventeen-year-old talking straight to you than an accomplished adult author.

    Some examples? He says things like "You''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''d have liked [Allie]" to give the illusion that he’s right there talking at you. He uses italics to make the words read with the same emphasis as spoken word ("He''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s my brother and all"). You''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''ll hear him describe places and people all the time as "corny" or "phony." He''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''ll tell us he''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s never waited anywhere so long in his "goddamn life. [He] swear[s]" (24. 97), or that he''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s sweating "like a bastard" (24.100).

    Holden, it seems, is in the throes of an existential crisis. To a great degree he is numb to the pains and joys of life. Unable to come to terms with his brother s death, he has no one to show him the kind of parental or brotherly love that he himself gave Allie. Whenever someone does end up showing him even a hint of such love (such as Mr. Antolini ), Holden ends up being disappointed.

    Holden might see some romance in suicide and some comfort in the idea that it ends internal pain, but death does seem worse, the ultimate loneliness. He seen the effects of death on the living as well. He thus cannot do to Phoebe what Allie has done to them already.

  7. author
    godville_kate 18 Jan 2017 02:19

    It takes place in 1951 and it s about a 16 year old boy, Holden Caulfield. It takes place over the first few days after he gets kicked out of prep school. It s in first person form and he talks about what s going on around him and his views on life and society. I personally thought it was an amaaazing book and I ll probably read it again but a lot of other people didn t like it because he s really cynical so he complains through-out most of the book, but if you ask me it s definitely worth a shot.

  8. author
    Павел Девяткин 18 Jan 2017 06:46

    William Delaney | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

    In Chapter 9, Holden is extremely phony with Faith Cavendish when he calls her at a very late hour. He pretends to be a mutual friend of somebody named Eddie Birdsell and implies that he is a Princeton student. He pretends to be older than sixteen, as he does throughout the novel. There is no doubt that Holden does a lot of lying and misrepresenting.

    If an adult has every gotten on your case about uptalk, vocal fry , or saying “like” all the time, you get the point of Catcher in the Rye —you and Holden might say different things in different ways, but you both speak the same language: teenager. Holden’s style (which is the book’s style) is colloquial and slangy, sounding a lot more like a real seventeen-year-old talking straight to you than an accomplished adult author.

    Some examples? He says things like "You''d have liked [Allie]" to give the illusion that he’s right there talking at you. He uses italics to make the words read with the same emphasis as spoken word ("He''s my brother and all"). You''ll hear him describe places and people all the time as "corny" or "phony." He''ll tell us he''s never waited anywhere so long in his "goddamn life. [He] swear[s]" (24. 97), or that he''s sweating "like a bastard" (24.100).

  9. author
    redleopard540 18 Jan 2017 02:03

    William Delaney | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

    In Chapter 9, Holden is extremely phony with Faith Cavendish when he calls her at a very late hour. He pretends to be a mutual friend of somebody named Eddie Birdsell and implies that he is a Princeton student. He pretends to be older than sixteen, as he does throughout the novel. There is no doubt that Holden does a lot of lying and misrepresenting.

    If an adult has every gotten on your case about uptalk, vocal fry , or saying “like” all the time, you get the point of Catcher in the Rye —you and Holden might say different things in different ways, but you both speak the same language: teenager. Holden’s style (which is the book’s style) is colloquial and slangy, sounding a lot more like a real seventeen-year-old talking straight to you than an accomplished adult author.

    Some examples? He says things like "You'd have liked [Allie]" to give the illusion that he’s right there talking at you. He uses italics to make the words read with the same emphasis as spoken word ("He's my brother and all"). You'll hear him describe places and people all the time as "corny" or "phony." He'll tell us he's never waited anywhere so long in his "goddamn life. [He] swear[s]" (24. 97), or that he's sweating "like a bastard" (24.100).

  10. author
    organicfrog729 18 Jan 2017 01:59

    William Delaney | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

    In Chapter 9, Holden is extremely phony with Faith Cavendish when he calls her at a very late hour. He pretends to be a mutual friend of somebody named Eddie Birdsell and implies that he is a Princeton student. He pretends to be older than sixteen, as he does throughout the novel. There is no doubt that Holden does a lot of lying and misrepresenting.

    If an adult has every gotten on your case about uptalk, vocal fry , or saying “like” all the time, you get the point of Catcher in the Rye —you and Holden might say different things in different ways, but you both speak the same language: teenager. Holden’s style (which is the book’s style) is colloquial and slangy, sounding a lot more like a real seventeen-year-old talking straight to you than an accomplished adult author.

    Some examples? He says things like "You''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''d have liked [Allie]" to give the illusion that he’s right there talking at you. He uses italics to make the words read with the same emphasis as spoken word ("He''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s my brother and all"). You''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''ll hear him describe places and people all the time as "corny" or "phony." He''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''ll tell us he''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s never waited anywhere so long in his "goddamn life. [He] swear[s]" (24. 97), or that he''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s sweating "like a bastard" (24.100).

    Holden, it seems, is in the throes of an existential crisis. To a great degree he is numb to the pains and joys of life. Unable to come to terms with his brother s death, he has no one to show him the kind of parental or brotherly love that he himself gave Allie. Whenever someone does end up showing him even a hint of such love (such as Mr. Antolini ), Holden ends up being disappointed.

    Holden might see some romance in suicide and some comfort in the idea that it ends internal pain, but death does seem worse, the ultimate loneliness. He seen the effects of death on the living as well. He thus cannot do to Phoebe what Allie has done to them already.

    Although J.D. Salinger has written many short stories, The Catcher in the Rye is Salinger s only novel and his most notable work, earning him great fame and admiration as a writer and sparking many high school students interest in great literature. The protagonist s adventures and concerns about phony people engage readers young and old.

    The novel draws on characters and themes that appeared in a number of Salinger s earlier short stories, some of which form the basis for individual chapters in The Catcher in the Rye. Indeed, the Caulfield family is the subject of two of Salinger s major stories, This Sandwich Has No Mayonnaise and I m Crazy, as well as a number of unpublished works.

    When Mr. Spencer advises Holden to see his life as a game, Holden pretends to affirm the sentiment. But in reality, he believes this worldview is only helpful to those who already hold positions of relative advantage.

    The disconnect between Holden’s external speech and his interior monologue marks his distance from adult society. His spoken language is polite and submissive, using the term “sir” and repeating with subservience “I know it is. I know it,” as if he does not have any additional independent thoughts. Yet when the text moves into his mind, we see a very different tone: one that immediately swears—“my ass”—and then goes on to invalidate his previous comment.

  11. author
    bigwolf231 18 Jan 2017 06:24

    Catcher In The Rye Phony

  12. author
    orangefish297 18 Jan 2017 00:52

    The Catcher in the Rye Character Analysis: Holden and the Phonies OK, but how can Holden be enthusiastic about meeting people when he deems everyone and their mother (literally – he encounters quite a few mothers in this story) to be phony? In his mind, everyone is a social-climber, a name-dropper, appearance-obsessed, a secret slob, a private flit, or a suck-up. Holden finds any semblance of normal adult life to be "phony." He doesn t want to grow up and get a job and play golf and drink martinis and go to an office. and he certainly doesn t want anything to do with the "bastards" that do. Except that, really, he sort of does. So what s the catch? Basically, if Holden calls everyone a phony, he can feel better when they reject him. It s not his fault the three girls in the Lavender Room weren t terribly interested in giving him the time of day; they were just phonies who couldn t carry on a conversation. He can t feel bad if Ackley doesn t want to let him stay and chat; Ackley s just a pimply moron. If Stradlater doesn t want to hang out, it s because he s a jerk. We prefer not to use tired, old terms like "defense mechanism," but we re certainly tempted to in this case. http://www.shmoop.com/catcher-in-the-rye/holden-caulfield.html

  13. author
    Владимир Ц.Лагошин 18 Jan 2017 02:17

    William Delaney | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

    In Chapter 9, Holden is extremely phony with Faith Cavendish when he calls her at a very late hour. He pretends to be a mutual friend of somebody named Eddie Birdsell and implies that he is a Princeton student. He pretends to be older than sixteen, as he does throughout the novel. There is no doubt that Holden does a lot of lying and misrepresenting.

  14. author
    brownfrog724 18 Jan 2017 09:22

    William Delaney | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

    In Chapter 9, Holden is extremely phony with Faith Cavendish when he calls her at a very late hour. He pretends to be a mutual friend of somebody named Eddie Birdsell and implies that he is a Princeton student. He pretends to be older than sixteen, as he does throughout the novel. There is no doubt that Holden does a lot of lying and misrepresenting.

    If an adult has every gotten on your case about uptalk, vocal fry , or saying “like” all the time, you get the point of Catcher in the Rye —you and Holden might say different things in different ways, but you both speak the same language: teenager. Holden’s style (which is the book’s style) is colloquial and slangy, sounding a lot more like a real seventeen-year-old talking straight to you than an accomplished adult author.

    Some examples? He says things like "You''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''d have liked [Allie]" to give the illusion that he’s right there talking at you. He uses italics to make the words read with the same emphasis as spoken word ("He''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s my brother and all"). You''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''ll hear him describe places and people all the time as "corny" or "phony." He''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''ll tell us he''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s never waited anywhere so long in his "goddamn life. [He] swear[s]" (24. 97), or that he''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s sweating "like a bastard" (24.100).

    Holden, it seems, is in the throes of an existential crisis. To a great degree he is numb to the pains and joys of life. Unable to come to terms with his brother s death, he has no one to show him the kind of parental or brotherly love that he himself gave Allie. Whenever someone does end up showing him even a hint of such love (such as Mr. Antolini ), Holden ends up being disappointed.

    Holden might see some romance in suicide and some comfort in the idea that it ends internal pain, but death does seem worse, the ultimate loneliness. He seen the effects of death on the living as well. He thus cannot do to Phoebe what Allie has done to them already.

    Although J.D. Salinger has written many short stories, The Catcher in the Rye is Salinger s only novel and his most notable work, earning him great fame and admiration as a writer and sparking many high school students interest in great literature. The protagonist s adventures and concerns about phony people engage readers young and old.

    The novel draws on characters and themes that appeared in a number of Salinger s earlier short stories, some of which form the basis for individual chapters in The Catcher in the Rye. Indeed, the Caulfield family is the subject of two of Salinger s major stories, This Sandwich Has No Mayonnaise and I m Crazy, as well as a number of unpublished works.

    When Mr. Spencer advises Holden to see his life as a game, Holden pretends to affirm the sentiment. But in reality, he believes this worldview is only helpful to those who already hold positions of relative advantage.

    The disconnect between Holden’s external speech and his interior monologue marks his distance from adult society. His spoken language is polite and submissive, using the term “sir” and repeating with subservience “I know it is. I know it,” as if he does not have any additional independent thoughts. Yet when the text moves into his mind, we see a very different tone: one that immediately swears—“my ass”—and then goes on to invalidate his previous comment.