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Of Mice and Men characters?

18 Jan 2017 21:24 | Author: biglion503 | Category: Pizza business plan software

John Steinbeck’s novel, Of Mice and Men , was first published in 1937. At the time, America was still suffering the grim aftermath of the depression and the itinerant workers who form the basis of the novel were very much within the consciousness of a nation separated by wealth yet driven by the idea of ‘the American dream’. Steinbeck’s novel is, however, essentially a tale of loneliness, of men struggling alone against a cold, uncaring and faceless destiny.

The central protagonists, George and Lennie are, as they are proud to proclaim, different from the others because they have each other. They are an odd couple, George the shrewd, wiry yet ultimately caring protector of the ironically named Lennie Small, who is, in fact, a huge man who doesn’t know his own strength and is mentally incapable of making the smallest of decisions for himself; he relies on George completely but equally, George needs Lennie as he gives him a reason to keep going. Lennie, despite his lack of intellect, senses this because when he knows George feels guilty for being angry with him, he takes advantage of the moment to manipulate George into repeating the story of their ‘dream future’, especially the rabbits they intend to keep with which Lennie is obsessed.

Comments
  1. author
    юрий поташов 18 Jan 2017 06:55

    Of Mice and Men was Steinbeck s seventh novel. Though he had achieved critical and popular success with his two preceding novels, Tortilla Flat (1935) and In Dubious Battle (1936), Of Mice and Men was an instant success on another level altogether. The book was chosen as a Book-of-the-Month club selection and garnered Steinbeck the financial stability and creative confidence necessary for his embarkation on his subsequent novel, The Grapes of Wrath (1939), which continues to be viewed as the best work of his career.

    Steinbeck drew his inspiration for the work from his experience living and working as a bindlestiff - or itinerant farmhand - during the 1920s. In a 1937 interview in The New York Times , Steinbeck said that the character of Lennie was based on a mentally impaired man he met in his travels who was prone to episodes of uncontrollable rage. The central question of where or how such a man might fit into society drives the action of Of Mice and Men , and the rest of the characters in the book are developed largely in terms of their relationships to this enigmatic central figure.

    An old, crippled man who has lost his hand, Candy is the swamper at the ranch. He remains attached to his aging dog, who has become so weak and sickly that it depends entirely on Candy to survive. Still, when Carlson objects to the dog s smell, Candy allows Carlson to put the dog out of its misery. Candy is a passive man, unable to take any independent action. Indeed, his one major act in the book - when he offers Lennie and George money in order to buy a piece of land with them - is a means by which he can become dependent on them.

    The son of the ranch owner, Curley is a man of short stature who is nevertheless a formidable boxer. Curley is aggressive, boastful and cocky, with a volatile temper and a tendency to provoke conflict with the weak, as he does with Lennie. Part of Curley s bravado stems from anxiety over his new wife, who everyone widely suspects of being a tramp. He spends a great deal of time monitoring her, believing her to be off with other men when she is not under his supervision.

    Lennie and George are migrant workers during the Great Depression. When the novel opens, they''''re on their way to work on a ranch in Salinas, California. Instead of going straight to the ranch, they camp by the river for the night and talk about their dream of one day having their own ranch.

    Overview Summary of the Novel
    Before reporting for work, migrant workers George Milton and Lennie Small spend the night on a peaceful riverbank. For the second time, George has to take away a dead mouse that Lennie has been petting. He consoles Lennie by recounting the story of their dream farm where Lennie will tend rabbits.

  2. author
    bluemeercat889 18 Jan 2017 09:07

    Of Mice and Men was Steinbeck s seventh novel. Though he had achieved critical and popular success with his two preceding novels, Tortilla Flat (1935) and In Dubious Battle (1936), Of Mice and Men was an instant success on another level altogether. The book was chosen as a Book-of-the-Month club selection and garnered Steinbeck the financial stability and creative confidence necessary for his embarkation on his subsequent novel, The Grapes of Wrath (1939), which continues to be viewed as the best work of his career.

    Steinbeck drew his inspiration for the work from his experience living and working as a bindlestiff - or itinerant farmhand - during the 1920s. In a 1937 interview in The New York Times , Steinbeck said that the character of Lennie was based on a mentally impaired man he met in his travels who was prone to episodes of uncontrollable rage. The central question of where or how such a man might fit into society drives the action of Of Mice and Men , and the rest of the characters in the book are developed largely in terms of their relationships to this enigmatic central figure.

    An old, crippled man who has lost his hand, Candy is the swamper at the ranch. He remains attached to his aging dog, who has become so weak and sickly that it depends entirely on Candy to survive. Still, when Carlson objects to the dog s smell, Candy allows Carlson to put the dog out of its misery. Candy is a passive man, unable to take any independent action. Indeed, his one major act in the book - when he offers Lennie and George money in order to buy a piece of land with them - is a means by which he can become dependent on them.

    The son of the ranch owner, Curley is a man of short stature who is nevertheless a formidable boxer. Curley is aggressive, boastful and cocky, with a volatile temper and a tendency to provoke conflict with the weak, as he does with Lennie. Part of Curley s bravado stems from anxiety over his new wife, who everyone widely suspects of being a tramp. He spends a great deal of time monitoring her, believing her to be off with other men when she is not under his supervision.

    Lennie and George are migrant workers during the Great Depression. When the novel opens, they''''''''''''''''re on their way to work on a ranch in Salinas, California. Instead of going straight to the ranch, they camp by the river for the night and talk about their dream of one day having their own ranch.

    Overview Summary of the Novel
    Before reporting for work, migrant workers George Milton and Lennie Small spend the night on a peaceful riverbank. For the second time, George has to take away a dead mouse that Lennie has been petting. He consoles Lennie by recounting the story of their dream farm where Lennie will tend rabbits.

    e-martin | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

    Steinbeck's short novel follows two men, George and Lennie, as they take on a new job working on a ranch in central California "bucking barley" for the ranch owner and his son.

  3. author
    ticklishpeacock204 17 Jan 2017 23:19

    Of Mice and Men was Steinbeck s seventh novel. Though he had achieved critical and popular success with his two preceding novels, Tortilla Flat (1935) and In Dubious Battle (1936), Of Mice and Men was an instant success on another level altogether. The book was chosen as a Book-of-the-Month club selection and garnered Steinbeck the financial stability and creative confidence necessary for his embarkation on his subsequent novel, The Grapes of Wrath (1939), which continues to be viewed as the best work of his career.

    Steinbeck drew his inspiration for the work from his experience living and working as a bindlestiff - or itinerant farmhand - during the 1920s. In a 1937 interview in The New York Times , Steinbeck said that the character of Lennie was based on a mentally impaired man he met in his travels who was prone to episodes of uncontrollable rage. The central question of where or how such a man might fit into society drives the action of Of Mice and Men , and the rest of the characters in the book are developed largely in terms of their relationships to this enigmatic central figure.

    An old, crippled man who has lost his hand, Candy is the swamper at the ranch. He remains attached to his aging dog, who has become so weak and sickly that it depends entirely on Candy to survive. Still, when Carlson objects to the dog s smell, Candy allows Carlson to put the dog out of its misery. Candy is a passive man, unable to take any independent action. Indeed, his one major act in the book - when he offers Lennie and George money in order to buy a piece of land with them - is a means by which he can become dependent on them.

    The son of the ranch owner, Curley is a man of short stature who is nevertheless a formidable boxer. Curley is aggressive, boastful and cocky, with a volatile temper and a tendency to provoke conflict with the weak, as he does with Lennie. Part of Curley s bravado stems from anxiety over his new wife, who everyone widely suspects of being a tramp. He spends a great deal of time monitoring her, believing her to be off with other men when she is not under his supervision.

    Lennie and George are migrant workers during the Great Depression. When the novel opens, they''re on their way to work on a ranch in Salinas, California. Instead of going straight to the ranch, they camp by the river for the night and talk about their dream of one day having their own ranch.

    Overview Summary of the Novel
    Before reporting for work, migrant workers George Milton and Lennie Small spend the night on a peaceful riverbank. For the second time, George has to take away a dead mouse that Lennie has been petting. He consoles Lennie by recounting the story of their dream farm where Lennie will tend rabbits.

  4. author
    brownmeercat915 17 Jan 2017 22:01

    Of Mice and Men was Steinbeck s seventh novel. Though he had achieved critical and popular success with his two preceding novels, Tortilla Flat (1935) and In Dubious Battle (1936), Of Mice and Men was an instant success on another level altogether. The book was chosen as a Book-of-the-Month club selection and garnered Steinbeck the financial stability and creative confidence necessary for his embarkation on his subsequent novel, The Grapes of Wrath (1939), which continues to be viewed as the best work of his career.

    Steinbeck drew his inspiration for the work from his experience living and working as a bindlestiff - or itinerant farmhand - during the 1920s. In a 1937 interview in The New York Times , Steinbeck said that the character of Lennie was based on a mentally impaired man he met in his travels who was prone to episodes of uncontrollable rage. The central question of where or how such a man might fit into society drives the action of Of Mice and Men , and the rest of the characters in the book are developed largely in terms of their relationships to this enigmatic central figure.

    An old, crippled man who has lost his hand, Candy is the swamper at the ranch. He remains attached to his aging dog, who has become so weak and sickly that it depends entirely on Candy to survive. Still, when Carlson objects to the dog s smell, Candy allows Carlson to put the dog out of its misery. Candy is a passive man, unable to take any independent action. Indeed, his one major act in the book - when he offers Lennie and George money in order to buy a piece of land with them - is a means by which he can become dependent on them.

    The son of the ranch owner, Curley is a man of short stature who is nevertheless a formidable boxer. Curley is aggressive, boastful and cocky, with a volatile temper and a tendency to provoke conflict with the weak, as he does with Lennie. Part of Curley s bravado stems from anxiety over his new wife, who everyone widely suspects of being a tramp. He spends a great deal of time monitoring her, believing her to be off with other men when she is not under his supervision.

    Lennie and George are migrant workers during the Great Depression. When the novel opens, they're on their way to work on a ranch in Salinas, California. Instead of going straight to the ranch, they camp by the river for the night and talk about their dream of one day having their own ranch.

    Overview Summary of the Novel
    Before reporting for work, migrant workers George Milton and Lennie Small spend the night on a peaceful riverbank. For the second time, George has to take away a dead mouse that Lennie has been petting. He consoles Lennie by recounting the story of their dream farm where Lennie will tend rabbits.

  5. author
    purplegorilla278 18 Jan 2017 05:49

    Of Mice and Men was Steinbeck s seventh novel. Though he had achieved critical and popular success with his two preceding novels, Tortilla Flat (1935) and In Dubious Battle (1936), Of Mice and Men was an instant success on another level altogether. The book was chosen as a Book-of-the-Month club selection and garnered Steinbeck the financial stability and creative confidence necessary for his embarkation on his subsequent novel, The Grapes of Wrath (1939), which continues to be viewed as the best work of his career.

    Steinbeck drew his inspiration for the work from his experience living and working as a bindlestiff - or itinerant farmhand - during the 1920s. In a 1937 interview in The New York Times , Steinbeck said that the character of Lennie was based on a mentally impaired man he met in his travels who was prone to episodes of uncontrollable rage. The central question of where or how such a man might fit into society drives the action of Of Mice and Men , and the rest of the characters in the book are developed largely in terms of their relationships to this enigmatic central figure.

    An old, crippled man who has lost his hand, Candy is the swamper at the ranch. He remains attached to his aging dog, who has become so weak and sickly that it depends entirely on Candy to survive. Still, when Carlson objects to the dog s smell, Candy allows Carlson to put the dog out of its misery. Candy is a passive man, unable to take any independent action. Indeed, his one major act in the book - when he offers Lennie and George money in order to buy a piece of land with them - is a means by which he can become dependent on them.

    The son of the ranch owner, Curley is a man of short stature who is nevertheless a formidable boxer. Curley is aggressive, boastful and cocky, with a volatile temper and a tendency to provoke conflict with the weak, as he does with Lennie. Part of Curley s bravado stems from anxiety over his new wife, who everyone widely suspects of being a tramp. He spends a great deal of time monitoring her, believing her to be off with other men when she is not under his supervision.

    Lennie and George are migrant workers during the Great Depression. When the novel opens, they''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''re on their way to work on a ranch in Salinas, California. Instead of going straight to the ranch, they camp by the river for the night and talk about their dream of one day having their own ranch.

    Overview Summary of the Novel
    Before reporting for work, migrant workers George Milton and Lennie Small spend the night on a peaceful riverbank. For the second time, George has to take away a dead mouse that Lennie has been petting. He consoles Lennie by recounting the story of their dream farm where Lennie will tend rabbits.

    e-martin | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

    Steinbeck''s short novel follows two men, George and Lennie, as they take on a new job working on a ranch in central California "bucking barley" for the ranch owner and his son.

    Quote 1: "Evening of a hot day started the little wind to moving among the leaves. The shade climbed up the hills toward the top. On the sand banks the rabbits sat as quietly as little gray, sculptured stones." Chapter 1, pg. 2

    Quote 4: "Slowly, like a terrier who doesn't want to bring a ball to its master, Lennie approached, drew back, approached again." Chapter 1, pg. 9

  6. author
    greenpanda594 18 Jan 2017 09:19

    Of Mice and Men was Steinbeck s seventh novel. Though he had achieved critical and popular success with his two preceding novels, Tortilla Flat (1935) and In Dubious Battle (1936), Of Mice and Men was an instant success on another level altogether. The book was chosen as a Book-of-the-Month club selection and garnered Steinbeck the financial stability and creative confidence necessary for his embarkation on his subsequent novel, The Grapes of Wrath (1939), which continues to be viewed as the best work of his career.

    Steinbeck drew his inspiration for the work from his experience living and working as a bindlestiff - or itinerant farmhand - during the 1920s. In a 1937 interview in The New York Times , Steinbeck said that the character of Lennie was based on a mentally impaired man he met in his travels who was prone to episodes of uncontrollable rage. The central question of where or how such a man might fit into society drives the action of Of Mice and Men , and the rest of the characters in the book are developed largely in terms of their relationships to this enigmatic central figure.

    An old, crippled man who has lost his hand, Candy is the swamper at the ranch. He remains attached to his aging dog, who has become so weak and sickly that it depends entirely on Candy to survive. Still, when Carlson objects to the dog s smell, Candy allows Carlson to put the dog out of its misery. Candy is a passive man, unable to take any independent action. Indeed, his one major act in the book - when he offers Lennie and George money in order to buy a piece of land with them - is a means by which he can become dependent on them.

    The son of the ranch owner, Curley is a man of short stature who is nevertheless a formidable boxer. Curley is aggressive, boastful and cocky, with a volatile temper and a tendency to provoke conflict with the weak, as he does with Lennie. Part of Curley s bravado stems from anxiety over his new wife, who everyone widely suspects of being a tramp. He spends a great deal of time monitoring her, believing her to be off with other men when she is not under his supervision.

    Lennie and George are migrant workers during the Great Depression. When the novel opens, they''''''''re on their way to work on a ranch in Salinas, California. Instead of going straight to the ranch, they camp by the river for the night and talk about their dream of one day having their own ranch.

    Overview Summary of the Novel
    Before reporting for work, migrant workers George Milton and Lennie Small spend the night on a peaceful riverbank. For the second time, George has to take away a dead mouse that Lennie has been petting. He consoles Lennie by recounting the story of their dream farm where Lennie will tend rabbits.

  7. author
    Весельчак 18 Jan 2017 00:53

    Of Mice and Men was Steinbeck s seventh novel. Though he had achieved critical and popular success with his two preceding novels, Tortilla Flat (1935) and In Dubious Battle (1936), Of Mice and Men was an instant success on another level altogether. The book was chosen as a Book-of-the-Month club selection and garnered Steinbeck the financial stability and creative confidence necessary for his embarkation on his subsequent novel, The Grapes of Wrath (1939), which continues to be viewed as the best work of his career.

    Steinbeck drew his inspiration for the work from his experience living and working as a bindlestiff - or itinerant farmhand - during the 1920s. In a 1937 interview in The New York Times , Steinbeck said that the character of Lennie was based on a mentally impaired man he met in his travels who was prone to episodes of uncontrollable rage. The central question of where or how such a man might fit into society drives the action of Of Mice and Men , and the rest of the characters in the book are developed largely in terms of their relationships to this enigmatic central figure.

    An old, crippled man who has lost his hand, Candy is the swamper at the ranch. He remains attached to his aging dog, who has become so weak and sickly that it depends entirely on Candy to survive. Still, when Carlson objects to the dog s smell, Candy allows Carlson to put the dog out of its misery. Candy is a passive man, unable to take any independent action. Indeed, his one major act in the book - when he offers Lennie and George money in order to buy a piece of land with them - is a means by which he can become dependent on them.

    The son of the ranch owner, Curley is a man of short stature who is nevertheless a formidable boxer. Curley is aggressive, boastful and cocky, with a volatile temper and a tendency to provoke conflict with the weak, as he does with Lennie. Part of Curley s bravado stems from anxiety over his new wife, who everyone widely suspects of being a tramp. He spends a great deal of time monitoring her, believing her to be off with other men when she is not under his supervision.

    Lennie and George are migrant workers during the Great Depression. When the novel opens, they''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''re on their way to work on a ranch in Salinas, California. Instead of going straight to the ranch, they camp by the river for the night and talk about their dream of one day having their own ranch.

    Overview Summary of the Novel
    Before reporting for work, migrant workers George Milton and Lennie Small spend the night on a peaceful riverbank. For the second time, George has to take away a dead mouse that Lennie has been petting. He consoles Lennie by recounting the story of their dream farm where Lennie will tend rabbits.

    e-martin | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

    Steinbeck''''s short novel follows two men, George and Lennie, as they take on a new job working on a ranch in central California "bucking barley" for the ranch owner and his son.

    Quote 1: "Evening of a hot day started the little wind to moving among the leaves. The shade climbed up the hills toward the top. On the sand banks the rabbits sat as quietly as little gray, sculptured stones." Chapter 1, pg. 2

    Quote 4: "Slowly, like a terrier who doesn''t want to bring a ball to its master, Lennie approached, drew back, approached again." Chapter 1, pg. 9

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  8. author
    blackgoose472 18 Jan 2017 08:39

    Of Mice and Men was Steinbeck s seventh novel. Though he had achieved critical and popular success with his two preceding novels, Tortilla Flat (1935) and In Dubious Battle (1936), Of Mice and Men was an instant success on another level altogether. The book was chosen as a Book-of-the-Month club selection and garnered Steinbeck the financial stability and creative confidence necessary for his embarkation on his subsequent novel, The Grapes of Wrath (1939), which continues to be viewed as the best work of his career.

    Steinbeck drew his inspiration for the work from his experience living and working as a bindlestiff - or itinerant farmhand - during the 1920s. In a 1937 interview in The New York Times , Steinbeck said that the character of Lennie was based on a mentally impaired man he met in his travels who was prone to episodes of uncontrollable rage. The central question of where or how such a man might fit into society drives the action of Of Mice and Men , and the rest of the characters in the book are developed largely in terms of their relationships to this enigmatic central figure.

    An old, crippled man who has lost his hand, Candy is the swamper at the ranch. He remains attached to his aging dog, who has become so weak and sickly that it depends entirely on Candy to survive. Still, when Carlson objects to the dog s smell, Candy allows Carlson to put the dog out of its misery. Candy is a passive man, unable to take any independent action. Indeed, his one major act in the book - when he offers Lennie and George money in order to buy a piece of land with them - is a means by which he can become dependent on them.

    The son of the ranch owner, Curley is a man of short stature who is nevertheless a formidable boxer. Curley is aggressive, boastful and cocky, with a volatile temper and a tendency to provoke conflict with the weak, as he does with Lennie. Part of Curley s bravado stems from anxiety over his new wife, who everyone widely suspects of being a tramp. He spends a great deal of time monitoring her, believing her to be off with other men when she is not under his supervision.

  9. author
    purplefrog644 18 Jan 2017 07:09

    Focus on Lennie as he has a hidden aspect of power, as to his control over George. He can get George to do whatever he wants by making him feel guilty. Lennie, as the child-like character, has a firm hold over the father-like George and this is shown through his actions towards his friend throughout the book. There s also Slim who has an unwilling position of power over the other men. They all look up to him and expect him to lead them, making him their leader, but he dislikes this position and always tries to shy away from it. There s also Curly who has a physical dominance over his wife and Crooks who uses his colour to gain a position of power over Lennie. I did Of Mice And Men for my GCSE. It s very simple and very very interesting.

  10. author
    goldenelephant106 18 Jan 2017 02:48

  11. author
    blackelephant543 18 Jan 2017 07:53

    Of Mice and Men was Steinbeck s seventh novel. Though he had achieved critical and popular success with his two preceding novels, Tortilla Flat (1935) and In Dubious Battle (1936), Of Mice and Men was an instant success on another level altogether. The book was chosen as a Book-of-the-Month club selection and garnered Steinbeck the financial stability and creative confidence necessary for his embarkation on his subsequent novel, The Grapes of Wrath (1939), which continues to be viewed as the best work of his career.

    Steinbeck drew his inspiration for the work from his experience living and working as a bindlestiff - or itinerant farmhand - during the 1920s. In a 1937 interview in The New York Times , Steinbeck said that the character of Lennie was based on a mentally impaired man he met in his travels who was prone to episodes of uncontrollable rage. The central question of where or how such a man might fit into society drives the action of Of Mice and Men , and the rest of the characters in the book are developed largely in terms of their relationships to this enigmatic central figure.