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Describe the relationship between Lennie and George in the story of mice and men?

18 Jan 2017 21:24 | Author: User1489940413 | Category: Bodycare business plan

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  1. author
    heavybear167 17 Jan 2017 23:37

    Of Mice and Men was Steinbeck s seventh novel. Though he had achieved critical and popular success with his two preceding novels, Tortilla Flat (1935) and In Dubious Battle (1936), Of Mice and Men was an instant success on another level altogether. The book was chosen as a Book-of-the-Month club selection and garnered Steinbeck the financial stability and creative confidence necessary for his embarkation on his subsequent novel, The Grapes of Wrath (1939), which continues to be viewed as the best work of his career.

    Steinbeck drew his inspiration for the work from his experience living and working as a bindlestiff - or itinerant farmhand - during the 1920s. In a 1937 interview in The New York Times , Steinbeck said that the character of Lennie was based on a mentally impaired man he met in his travels who was prone to episodes of uncontrollable rage. The central question of where or how such a man might fit into society drives the action of Of Mice and Men , and the rest of the characters in the book are developed largely in terms of their relationships to this enigmatic central figure.

    "Jesus, what a tramp!" George of the famous duo leading John Steinbeck''''s Of Mice and Men exclaims with disdain after first meeting Curley''''s wife, the newly married young woman living on the ranch. The audience, notably younger than usual Broadway theatergoers, dependably erupts with laughter, and as that subsides, George threatens Lennie, his lovable, mentally disabled friend, "Don''''t even look at that bitch" when Lennie innocently remarks how "purdy" she is.

    Literarily, Curley''''s wife is compared to an animal in an effort to reduce and humiliate her. She is mockingly referred to as a "Lulu," the same name for Slim''''s dog, described as a bitch who just "slang nine pups." "She''''d be better off dead," is the opinion of Candy''''s old dog, and that attitude is undoubtedly mirrored toward the lone woman. But when the dog gets led off to be shot, protests can be heard from the audience, and as a dog lover, I have the same feeling. Complaints can rarely be heard during Curley''''s wife''''s death.

    If one theme can be thought of as defining the plot and symbolism of Of Mice and Men , that theme is loneliness. In many ways, from the outspoken to the subtle (such as Steinbeck s decision to set the novel near Soledad, California, a town name that means solitude in Spanish), the presence of loneliness defines the actions of the diverse characters in the book.

    The itinerant farm worker of the Great Depression found it nearly impossible to establish a fixed home. These men were forced to wander from ranch to ranch seeking temporary employment, to live in bunk houses with strangers, and to suffer the abuses of arbitrary bosses. George sums up the misery of this situation at several points during his monologues to Lennie - Guys like us, that work on ranches, are the loneliest guys in the world. They got no family. They don t belong no place (15).

  2. author
    lazyswan279 17 Jan 2017 22:59

    Of Mice and Men was Steinbeck s seventh novel. Though he had achieved critical and popular success with his two preceding novels, Tortilla Flat (1935) and In Dubious Battle (1936), Of Mice and Men was an instant success on another level altogether. The book was chosen as a Book-of-the-Month club selection and garnered Steinbeck the financial stability and creative confidence necessary for his embarkation on his subsequent novel, The Grapes of Wrath (1939), which continues to be viewed as the best work of his career.

    Steinbeck drew his inspiration for the work from his experience living and working as a bindlestiff - or itinerant farmhand - during the 1920s. In a 1937 interview in The New York Times , Steinbeck said that the character of Lennie was based on a mentally impaired man he met in his travels who was prone to episodes of uncontrollable rage. The central question of where or how such a man might fit into society drives the action of Of Mice and Men , and the rest of the characters in the book are developed largely in terms of their relationships to this enigmatic central figure.

    "Jesus, what a tramp!" George of the famous duo leading John Steinbeck''''''''''''''''s Of Mice and Men exclaims with disdain after first meeting Curley''''''''''''''''s wife, the newly married young woman living on the ranch. The audience, notably younger than usual Broadway theatergoers, dependably erupts with laughter, and as that subsides, George threatens Lennie, his lovable, mentally disabled friend, "Don''''''''''''''''t even look at that bitch" when Lennie innocently remarks how "purdy" she is.

    Literarily, Curley''''''''''''''''s wife is compared to an animal in an effort to reduce and humiliate her. She is mockingly referred to as a "Lulu," the same name for Slim''''''''''''''''s dog, described as a bitch who just "slang nine pups." "She''''''''''''''''d be better off dead," is the opinion of Candy''''''''''''''''s old dog, and that attitude is undoubtedly mirrored toward the lone woman. But when the dog gets led off to be shot, protests can be heard from the audience, and as a dog lover, I have the same feeling. Complaints can rarely be heard during Curley''''''''''''''''s wife''''''''''''''''s death.

    If one theme can be thought of as defining the plot and symbolism of Of Mice and Men , that theme is loneliness. In many ways, from the outspoken to the subtle (such as Steinbeck s decision to set the novel near Soledad, California, a town name that means solitude in Spanish), the presence of loneliness defines the actions of the diverse characters in the book.

    The itinerant farm worker of the Great Depression found it nearly impossible to establish a fixed home. These men were forced to wander from ranch to ranch seeking temporary employment, to live in bunk houses with strangers, and to suffer the abuses of arbitrary bosses. George sums up the misery of this situation at several points during his monologues to Lennie - Guys like us, that work on ranches, are the loneliest guys in the world. They got no family. They don t belong no place (15).

    3. Paying attention to the long descriptive passages at the beginning of each section, discuss the ways in which the novella is similar to a theatrical play. Do these similarities strengthen or weaken the work? How?

    4. Discuss George’s actions at the end of the story. How can we justify what he does to Lennie? How can we condemn it?

    point of view · The story is told from the point of view of a third-person omniscient narrator, who can access the point of view of any character as required by the narrative.

    falling action · Lennie runs away from the barn; the men return and find Curley’s wife dead; Curley leads a mob of men to search for and kill Lennie; George finds Lennie in the clearing and, while retelling the story of life on their farm, shoots him in the back of the head.

  3. author
    pslrtgsvvn 18 Jan 2017 07:38

    Of Mice and Men quotes. Boatloads of Of Mice and Men quotes with analysis by PhD students from Stanford, Harvard, Berkeley. http://www.shmoop.com/of-mice-and-men/quotes.html http://www.shmoop.com/of-mice-and-men/themes.html

  4. author
    *̥ Saәәd.м ♪ ♡ 18 Jan 2017 01:20

    this is kind of a long one. i just finished doing this essay and its kind of a lot to think of. i think the characters are all conflicting (so there both weak and strong in different ways): Lennie: physically very strong but weak mentally Crooks: physically weak (disabled) but strong mentally Curley s wife: weak both physically (killed by lennie) and mentally (always repressed and oppressed her dreams and wishes) but she is sexually very strong and has power over the men George: strong mentally and fairly strong physically has power over lennie but also emotional weaknesses in that he loves lennie and has to suppress his emotion (and kill him) ummm you get the idea:L and with curleys wife its kind of confusing and long but basically she s ignored and degraded/demeaned so she defiantly tries to get attention by dressing sexually and flirting with slim/george and to some extents lennie. curley doesn t care for her and ignores her (shown by the fact we never know her name) and crushes her hopes and dreams by treating her as a possession to be guarded - he doesn t even show any emotion at her death except revenge. okay i think thats all. woaah i don t usually right ridiculously long ones:L sorry if that didn t help at all and wasn t what you wanted! :) good luck xxxx

  5. author
    heavyladybug456 18 Jan 2017 03:07

    Of Mice and Men was Steinbeck s seventh novel. Though he had achieved critical and popular success with his two preceding novels, Tortilla Flat (1935) and In Dubious Battle (1936), Of Mice and Men was an instant success on another level altogether. The book was chosen as a Book-of-the-Month club selection and garnered Steinbeck the financial stability and creative confidence necessary for his embarkation on his subsequent novel, The Grapes of Wrath (1939), which continues to be viewed as the best work of his career.

    Steinbeck drew his inspiration for the work from his experience living and working as a bindlestiff - or itinerant farmhand - during the 1920s. In a 1937 interview in The New York Times , Steinbeck said that the character of Lennie was based on a mentally impaired man he met in his travels who was prone to episodes of uncontrollable rage. The central question of where or how such a man might fit into society drives the action of Of Mice and Men , and the rest of the characters in the book are developed largely in terms of their relationships to this enigmatic central figure.

    "Jesus, what a tramp!" George of the famous duo leading John Steinbeck''s Of Mice and Men exclaims with disdain after first meeting Curley''s wife, the newly married young woman living on the ranch. The audience, notably younger than usual Broadway theatergoers, dependably erupts with laughter, and as that subsides, George threatens Lennie, his lovable, mentally disabled friend, "Don''t even look at that bitch" when Lennie innocently remarks how "purdy" she is.

    Literarily, Curley''s wife is compared to an animal in an effort to reduce and humiliate her. She is mockingly referred to as a "Lulu," the same name for Slim''s dog, described as a bitch who just "slang nine pups." "She''d be better off dead," is the opinion of Candy''s old dog, and that attitude is undoubtedly mirrored toward the lone woman. But when the dog gets led off to be shot, protests can be heard from the audience, and as a dog lover, I have the same feeling. Complaints can rarely be heard during Curley''s wife''s death.

  6. author
    organicduck894 18 Jan 2017 05:12

    Click here of mice and men essay relationships

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  7. author
    stnrus75 18 Jan 2017 09:27

    Of Mice and Men was Steinbeck s seventh novel. Though he had achieved critical and popular success with his two preceding novels, Tortilla Flat (1935) and In Dubious Battle (1936), Of Mice and Men was an instant success on another level altogether. The book was chosen as a Book-of-the-Month club selection and garnered Steinbeck the financial stability and creative confidence necessary for his embarkation on his subsequent novel, The Grapes of Wrath (1939), which continues to be viewed as the best work of his career.

    Steinbeck drew his inspiration for the work from his experience living and working as a bindlestiff - or itinerant farmhand - during the 1920s. In a 1937 interview in The New York Times , Steinbeck said that the character of Lennie was based on a mentally impaired man he met in his travels who was prone to episodes of uncontrollable rage. The central question of where or how such a man might fit into society drives the action of Of Mice and Men , and the rest of the characters in the book are developed largely in terms of their relationships to this enigmatic central figure.

    "Jesus, what a tramp!" George of the famous duo leading John Steinbeck''''''''s Of Mice and Men exclaims with disdain after first meeting Curley''''''''s wife, the newly married young woman living on the ranch. The audience, notably younger than usual Broadway theatergoers, dependably erupts with laughter, and as that subsides, George threatens Lennie, his lovable, mentally disabled friend, "Don''''''''t even look at that bitch" when Lennie innocently remarks how "purdy" she is.

    Literarily, Curley''''''''s wife is compared to an animal in an effort to reduce and humiliate her. She is mockingly referred to as a "Lulu," the same name for Slim''''''''s dog, described as a bitch who just "slang nine pups." "She''''''''d be better off dead," is the opinion of Candy''''''''s old dog, and that attitude is undoubtedly mirrored toward the lone woman. But when the dog gets led off to be shot, protests can be heard from the audience, and as a dog lover, I have the same feeling. Complaints can rarely be heard during Curley''''''''s wife''''''''s death.

    If one theme can be thought of as defining the plot and symbolism of Of Mice and Men , that theme is loneliness. In many ways, from the outspoken to the subtle (such as Steinbeck s decision to set the novel near Soledad, California, a town name that means solitude in Spanish), the presence of loneliness defines the actions of the diverse characters in the book.

    The itinerant farm worker of the Great Depression found it nearly impossible to establish a fixed home. These men were forced to wander from ranch to ranch seeking temporary employment, to live in bunk houses with strangers, and to suffer the abuses of arbitrary bosses. George sums up the misery of this situation at several points during his monologues to Lennie - Guys like us, that work on ranches, are the loneliest guys in the world. They got no family. They don t belong no place (15).

    3. Paying attention to the long descriptive passages at the beginning of each section, discuss the ways in which the novella is similar to a theatrical play. Do these similarities strengthen or weaken the work? How?

    4. Discuss George’s actions at the end of the story. How can we justify what he does to Lennie? How can we condemn it?

  8. author
    User1488510189 18 Jan 2017 01:52

    They are Drifters and George is like an older brother who watches out for Lenny and tries to keep him out of trouble and look after him. Lenny is slow and strong as an ox and George is the smart one of the two. Curly is the bosses son and seems to let that go to his head. He talks down to the workers and is very protective of his wife. He is aggressive and has a temper with a short fuse. Crooks is a bitter old man that is friendly to Lenny. Slim is the man who everyone respects and looks to as a leader. He is a fair and kind man that has a natural ability to lead. He is the only person that curly shows any respect to

  9. author
    User1489854740 18 Jan 2017 06:56

    Of Mice and Men was Steinbeck s seventh novel. Though he had achieved critical and popular success with his two preceding novels, Tortilla Flat (1935) and In Dubious Battle (1936), Of Mice and Men was an instant success on another level altogether. The book was chosen as a Book-of-the-Month club selection and garnered Steinbeck the financial stability and creative confidence necessary for his embarkation on his subsequent novel, The Grapes of Wrath (1939), which continues to be viewed as the best work of his career.

    Steinbeck drew his inspiration for the work from his experience living and working as a bindlestiff - or itinerant farmhand - during the 1920s. In a 1937 interview in The New York Times , Steinbeck said that the character of Lennie was based on a mentally impaired man he met in his travels who was prone to episodes of uncontrollable rage. The central question of where or how such a man might fit into society drives the action of Of Mice and Men , and the rest of the characters in the book are developed largely in terms of their relationships to this enigmatic central figure.

    "Jesus, what a tramp!" George of the famous duo leading John Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men exclaims with disdain after first meeting Curley's wife, the newly married young woman living on the ranch. The audience, notably younger than usual Broadway theatergoers, dependably erupts with laughter, and as that subsides, George threatens Lennie, his lovable, mentally disabled friend, "Don't even look at that bitch" when Lennie innocently remarks how "purdy" she is.

    Literarily, Curley's wife is compared to an animal in an effort to reduce and humiliate her. She is mockingly referred to as a "Lulu," the same name for Slim's dog, described as a bitch who just "slang nine pups." "She'd be better off dead," is the opinion of Candy's old dog, and that attitude is undoubtedly mirrored toward the lone woman. But when the dog gets led off to be shot, protests can be heard from the audience, and as a dog lover, I have the same feeling. Complaints can rarely be heard during Curley's wife's death.