15

Steinbeck Of Mice and Men - Free Essays, Term Papers.

18 Jan 2017 21:24 | Author: greenduck153 | Category: College compare and contrast essay examples

When we first meet Lennie and George, we almost can't tell them apart: "Both were dressed in denim trousers and in denim coats with brass buttons. Both wore black, shapeless hats and both carried tight blanket rolls slung over their shoulders" (1.4). They're two itinerant farmworkers, looking for work wherever they can. From a distance, there's nothing to tell either apart. But when we get closer, we see that this isn't a relationship of equals:

If this reminds you of a kid imitating his dad, then you're on the right track: from these few sentences, we know that something is seriously wrong with Lennie. Like a kid, he mournfully wishes for ketchup to put on his beans; like a kid, he demands a bedtime story—even when he knows it all himself: "No…you tell it. It ain't the same if I tell it. Go on…George. How I get to tend the rabbits" (1.121).

Comments
  1. author
    beautifulgoose531 18 Jan 2017 07:20

    Don''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t let the name fool you: Lennie Small is big. Unfortunately, that''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s about all he has going for him—that, and he''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s got a really good friend. So, what did Lennie do to deserve a friend like George?

    When we first meet Lennie and George, we almost can''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t tell them apart: "Both were dressed in denim trousers and in denim coats with brass buttons. Both wore black, shapeless hats and both carried tight blanket rolls slung over their shoulders" (1.4). They''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''re two itinerant farmworkers, looking for work wherever they can. From a distance, there''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s nothing to tell either apart. But when we get closer, we see that this isn''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t a relationship of equals:

    When the sound of the footsteps had died away, George turned on Lennie. "So you wasn''''''''''''''''t gonna say a word. You was gonna leave your big flapper shut and leave me do the talkin''''''''''''''''. Damn near lost us the job."

    "Yea, you forgot. You always forget, an'''''''''''''''' I got to talk you out of it." He sat down heavily on the bunk. "Now he''''''''''''''''s got his eye on us. Now we got to be careful and not make no slips. You keep your big flapper shut after this." He fell morosely silent. (2.56-59)

    We read the novel for my 9th grade English class, and I''''m supposed to be writing and essay about it right now, but oh well. It was an amazing book, though many of my classmates disliked it. The characters were impressive and I really liked old Candy. It was good for historical reference and offered a look at the depression.

    Of Mice and Men is a fantastic novel that shows how hard it was in the times of the Great Depression. The difference between Lennie and George compared to the migrant workers is that they had each other. In the novel, it shows how George takes care of Lennie who has a mental disability. Most of the migrant workers wanted to achieve the success of the American Dream that was different for every American. Lennie and George too wanted to the euphoria of achieving their American Dream. Lennie and George’s dream was to own a ranch and live off. Read more

    An old, crippled man who has lost his hand, Candy is the swamper at the ranch. He remains attached to his aging dog, who has become so weak and sickly that it depends entirely on Candy to survive. Still, when Carlson objects to the dog s smell, Candy allows Carlson to put the dog out of its misery. Candy is a passive man, unable to take any independent action. Indeed, his one major act in the book - when he offers Lennie and George money in order to buy a piece of land with them - is a means by which he can become dependent on them.

    The son of the ranch owner, Curley is a man of short stature who is nevertheless a formidable boxer. Curley is aggressive, boastful and cocky, with a volatile temper and a tendency to provoke conflict with the weak, as he does with Lennie. Part of Curley s bravado stems from anxiety over his new wife, who everyone widely suspects of being a tramp. He spends a great deal of time monitoring her, believing her to be off with other men when she is not under his supervision.

    The next day, George confides in Slim that he and Lennie are not cousins, but have been friends since childhood. He tells how Lennie has often gotten them into trouble. For instance, they were forced to flee their last job because Lennie tried to touch a woman’s dress and was accused of rape. Slim agrees to give Lennie one of his puppies, and Carlson continues to badger Candy to kill his old dog. When Slim agrees with Carlson, saying that death would be a welcome relief to the suffering animal, Candy gives in. Carlson, before leading the dog outside, promises to do the job painlessly.

    Lennie flees back to a pool of the Salinas River that George had designated as a meeting place should either of them get into trouble. As the men back at the ranch discover what has happened and gather together a lynch party, George joins Lennie. Much to Lennie’s surprise, George is not mad at him for doing “a bad thing.” George begins to tell Lennie the story of the farm they will have together. As he describes the rabbits that Lennie will tend, the sound of the approaching lynch party grows louder. George shoots his friend in the back of the head.

  2. author
    silverrabbit910 17 Jan 2017 22:42

    Don''t let the name fool you: Lennie Small is big. Unfortunately, that''s about all he has going for him—that, and he''s got a really good friend. So, what did Lennie do to deserve a friend like George?

    When we first meet Lennie and George, we almost can''t tell them apart: "Both were dressed in denim trousers and in denim coats with brass buttons. Both wore black, shapeless hats and both carried tight blanket rolls slung over their shoulders" (1.4). They''re two itinerant farmworkers, looking for work wherever they can. From a distance, there''s nothing to tell either apart. But when we get closer, we see that this isn''t a relationship of equals:

    When the sound of the footsteps had died away, George turned on Lennie. "So you wasn't gonna say a word. You was gonna leave your big flapper shut and leave me do the talkin'. Damn near lost us the job."

    "Yea, you forgot. You always forget, an' I got to talk you out of it." He sat down heavily on the bunk. "Now he's got his eye on us. Now we got to be careful and not make no slips. You keep your big flapper shut after this." He fell morosely silent. (2.56-59)

  3. author
    Доступный Дом 18 Jan 2017 00:51

    Don''''''''''''''''t let the name fool you: Lennie Small is big. Unfortunately, that''''''''''''''''s about all he has going for him—that, and he''''''''''''''''s got a really good friend. So, what did Lennie do to deserve a friend like George?

    When we first meet Lennie and George, we almost can''''''''''''''''t tell them apart: "Both were dressed in denim trousers and in denim coats with brass buttons. Both wore black, shapeless hats and both carried tight blanket rolls slung over their shoulders" (1.4). They''''''''''''''''re two itinerant farmworkers, looking for work wherever they can. From a distance, there''''''''''''''''s nothing to tell either apart. But when we get closer, we see that this isn''''''''''''''''t a relationship of equals:

    When the sound of the footsteps had died away, George turned on Lennie. "So you wasn''''''''t gonna say a word. You was gonna leave your big flapper shut and leave me do the talkin''''''''. Damn near lost us the job."

    "Yea, you forgot. You always forget, an'''''''' I got to talk you out of it." He sat down heavily on the bunk. "Now he''''''''s got his eye on us. Now we got to be careful and not make no slips. You keep your big flapper shut after this." He fell morosely silent. (2.56-59)

    We read the novel for my 9th grade English class, and I''m supposed to be writing and essay about it right now, but oh well. It was an amazing book, though many of my classmates disliked it. The characters were impressive and I really liked old Candy. It was good for historical reference and offered a look at the depression.

    Of Mice and Men is a fantastic novel that shows how hard it was in the times of the Great Depression. The difference between Lennie and George compared to the migrant workers is that they had each other. In the novel, it shows how George takes care of Lennie who has a mental disability. Most of the migrant workers wanted to achieve the success of the American Dream that was different for every American. Lennie and George too wanted to the euphoria of achieving their American Dream. Lennie and George’s dream was to own a ranch and live off. Read more

    An old, crippled man who has lost his hand, Candy is the swamper at the ranch. He remains attached to his aging dog, who has become so weak and sickly that it depends entirely on Candy to survive. Still, when Carlson objects to the dog s smell, Candy allows Carlson to put the dog out of its misery. Candy is a passive man, unable to take any independent action. Indeed, his one major act in the book - when he offers Lennie and George money in order to buy a piece of land with them - is a means by which he can become dependent on them.

    The son of the ranch owner, Curley is a man of short stature who is nevertheless a formidable boxer. Curley is aggressive, boastful and cocky, with a volatile temper and a tendency to provoke conflict with the weak, as he does with Lennie. Part of Curley s bravado stems from anxiety over his new wife, who everyone widely suspects of being a tramp. He spends a great deal of time monitoring her, believing her to be off with other men when she is not under his supervision.

  4. author
    purpletiger799 18 Jan 2017 00:30

    There are quote a few quotes that show Lennie s childish nature. Here are a few This first one comes from Chapter 1 and is said by George. It seems as though George is the father and Lennie is his child. "Whatever we ain t got, that s what you want. God a mighty, if I was alone I could live so easy. I could go get a job an work, an no trouble." (p. 11) A second quote stated by George to Lennie quite a few times is, "Say it over to yourself, Lennie, so you won t forget it." (p.29). Here, we can see that George again treats Lennie like a child because he can not remember anything and must be constantly reminded of what he has to do. Finally, toward the end of the novel, Lennie states, "You ain t gonna leave me, are ya George?" (p. 98) He is fearing, as a little child would, that he will be left all along, and both he and George know that Lennie can not be on his own. ============================= "Of Mice and Men", the novel by John Steinbaeck, is about two men s struggle to achieve their dream. George Milton and Lennie Small are casual workers who move around different ranches doing jobs when they are required. They move to a ranch near the town of Soledad with the hope of making enough money to buy a ranch of their own. The novel ends tragically when Lennie accidentally kills Curley s wife and George is forced to shoot him. Lennie is one of the most interesting characters in the book because he differs from the others in a number of ways. He has a very simple mind and often acts like a child. He is also very strong but he is not in control of his strength. I admire Lennie because he is unprejudiced and treats everyone the same.We don t know a lot about Lennie s background. Judging by what we are told of his past, he didn t have a "normal" happy upbringing. We don t know what happened to Lennie s family and parents and why he didn t live with them, just that he was looked after by his Aunt Clara. Lennie was picked on by George and his friends because of his lack of intelligence but to Lennie this must have seemed normal. We learn from George about out an incident that happened when they were younger ===================================== Had Lennie been allowed to live he would have been a danger to himself and the people around him. Lennie s actions are often animal like and show his lack of intelligence. We get warning signs about his strength from early on in the book, these are also clues about what happens at the end of the book. He doesn t have a good memory and often forgets things that George tells him. He does not understand people s prejudices and treats everyone the same. Lennie is very trusting and will do anything that George tells him to do. Afterwards, Lennie was very thankful to George for rescuing him but he couldn t remember that George had told him to jump in, in the first place. When they go to see the boss, George does all the talking. He is the only person Lennie has in the world. This is sad because Lennie had nothing but good intentions. He didn t make judgments about people, he was fair and treated every one the same. When his Aunt Clara died, Lennie started to go round ranches with George. " He doesn t know that when someone screams he should let go of the instead of holding on.

  5. author
    бабка у подъезда 18 Jan 2017 07:13

    Don''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t let the name fool you: Lennie Small is big. Unfortunately, that''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s about all he has going for him—that, and he''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s got a really good friend. So, what did Lennie do to deserve a friend like George?

    When we first meet Lennie and George, we almost can''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t tell them apart: "Both were dressed in denim trousers and in denim coats with brass buttons. Both wore black, shapeless hats and both carried tight blanket rolls slung over their shoulders" (1.4). They''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''re two itinerant farmworkers, looking for work wherever they can. From a distance, there''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s nothing to tell either apart. But when we get closer, we see that this isn''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t a relationship of equals:

    When the sound of the footsteps had died away, George turned on Lennie. "So you wasn''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t gonna say a word. You was gonna leave your big flapper shut and leave me do the talkin''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''. Damn near lost us the job."

    "Yea, you forgot. You always forget, an'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''' I got to talk you out of it." He sat down heavily on the bunk. "Now he''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s got his eye on us. Now we got to be careful and not make no slips. You keep your big flapper shut after this." He fell morosely silent. (2.56-59)

    We read the novel for my 9th grade English class, and I''''''''''''''''m supposed to be writing and essay about it right now, but oh well. It was an amazing book, though many of my classmates disliked it. The characters were impressive and I really liked old Candy. It was good for historical reference and offered a look at the depression.

    Of Mice and Men is a fantastic novel that shows how hard it was in the times of the Great Depression. The difference between Lennie and George compared to the migrant workers is that they had each other. In the novel, it shows how George takes care of Lennie who has a mental disability. Most of the migrant workers wanted to achieve the success of the American Dream that was different for every American. Lennie and George too wanted to the euphoria of achieving their American Dream. Lennie and George’s dream was to own a ranch and live off. Read more

    An old, crippled man who has lost his hand, Candy is the swamper at the ranch. He remains attached to his aging dog, who has become so weak and sickly that it depends entirely on Candy to survive. Still, when Carlson objects to the dog s smell, Candy allows Carlson to put the dog out of its misery. Candy is a passive man, unable to take any independent action. Indeed, his one major act in the book - when he offers Lennie and George money in order to buy a piece of land with them - is a means by which he can become dependent on them.

    The son of the ranch owner, Curley is a man of short stature who is nevertheless a formidable boxer. Curley is aggressive, boastful and cocky, with a volatile temper and a tendency to provoke conflict with the weak, as he does with Lennie. Part of Curley s bravado stems from anxiety over his new wife, who everyone widely suspects of being a tramp. He spends a great deal of time monitoring her, believing her to be off with other men when she is not under his supervision.

    The next day, George confides in Slim that he and Lennie are not cousins, but have been friends since childhood. He tells how Lennie has often gotten them into trouble. For instance, they were forced to flee their last job because Lennie tried to touch a woman’s dress and was accused of rape. Slim agrees to give Lennie one of his puppies, and Carlson continues to badger Candy to kill his old dog. When Slim agrees with Carlson, saying that death would be a welcome relief to the suffering animal, Candy gives in. Carlson, before leading the dog outside, promises to do the job painlessly.

    Lennie flees back to a pool of the Salinas River that George had designated as a meeting place should either of them get into trouble. As the men back at the ranch discover what has happened and gather together a lynch party, George joins Lennie. Much to Lennie’s surprise, George is not mad at him for doing “a bad thing.” George begins to tell Lennie the story of the farm they will have together. As he describes the rabbits that Lennie will tend, the sound of the approaching lynch party grows louder. George shoots his friend in the back of the head.

    In Of Mice and Men , George kills Lennie to spare him from a painful death at the hands of the mob. When the men on the farm find discover that Lennie has killed Curley’s wife, they set out to find him. George knows Curley will not care that Lennie’s actions were unintentional and decides to give Lennie a quick and merciful death to spare him from the suffering he would endure if left to Curley and the other farmhands.

    cybil | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator

  6. author
    Хоггүй МНГ Байгаль 17 Jan 2017 23:31

    Alist of all the characters in Of Mice and Men. The Of Mice and Men characters covered include: Lennie, George, Candy, Curley’s wife, Crooks, Curley.

  7. author
    П.У.М.Б. 18 Jan 2017 09:14

    Don''''t let the name fool you: Lennie Small is big. Unfortunately, that''''s about all he has going for him—that, and he''''s got a really good friend. So, what did Lennie do to deserve a friend like George?

    When we first meet Lennie and George, we almost can''''t tell them apart: "Both were dressed in denim trousers and in denim coats with brass buttons. Both wore black, shapeless hats and both carried tight blanket rolls slung over their shoulders" (1.4). They''''re two itinerant farmworkers, looking for work wherever they can. From a distance, there''''s nothing to tell either apart. But when we get closer, we see that this isn''''t a relationship of equals:

    When the sound of the footsteps had died away, George turned on Lennie. "So you wasn''t gonna say a word. You was gonna leave your big flapper shut and leave me do the talkin''. Damn near lost us the job."

    "Yea, you forgot. You always forget, an'' I got to talk you out of it." He sat down heavily on the bunk. "Now he''s got his eye on us. Now we got to be careful and not make no slips. You keep your big flapper shut after this." He fell morosely silent. (2.56-59)

  8. author
    Націсні Л для Лукыру 18 Jan 2017 03:42

    Don''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t let the name fool you: Lennie Small is big. Unfortunately, that''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s about all he has going for him—that, and he''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s got a really good friend. So, what did Lennie do to deserve a friend like George?

    When we first meet Lennie and George, we almost can''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t tell them apart: "Both were dressed in denim trousers and in denim coats with brass buttons. Both wore black, shapeless hats and both carried tight blanket rolls slung over their shoulders" (1.4). They''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''re two itinerant farmworkers, looking for work wherever they can. From a distance, there''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s nothing to tell either apart. But when we get closer, we see that this isn''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t a relationship of equals:

    When the sound of the footsteps had died away, George turned on Lennie. "So you wasn''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t gonna say a word. You was gonna leave your big flapper shut and leave me do the talkin''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''. Damn near lost us the job."

    "Yea, you forgot. You always forget, an'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''' I got to talk you out of it." He sat down heavily on the bunk. "Now he''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s got his eye on us. Now we got to be careful and not make no slips. You keep your big flapper shut after this." He fell morosely silent. (2.56-59)

    We read the novel for my 9th grade English class, and I''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''m supposed to be writing and essay about it right now, but oh well. It was an amazing book, though many of my classmates disliked it. The characters were impressive and I really liked old Candy. It was good for historical reference and offered a look at the depression.

    Of Mice and Men is a fantastic novel that shows how hard it was in the times of the Great Depression. The difference between Lennie and George compared to the migrant workers is that they had each other. In the novel, it shows how George takes care of Lennie who has a mental disability. Most of the migrant workers wanted to achieve the success of the American Dream that was different for every American. Lennie and George too wanted to the euphoria of achieving their American Dream. Lennie and George’s dream was to own a ranch and live off. Read more

    An old, crippled man who has lost his hand, Candy is the swamper at the ranch. He remains attached to his aging dog, who has become so weak and sickly that it depends entirely on Candy to survive. Still, when Carlson objects to the dog s smell, Candy allows Carlson to put the dog out of its misery. Candy is a passive man, unable to take any independent action. Indeed, his one major act in the book - when he offers Lennie and George money in order to buy a piece of land with them - is a means by which he can become dependent on them.

    The son of the ranch owner, Curley is a man of short stature who is nevertheless a formidable boxer. Curley is aggressive, boastful and cocky, with a volatile temper and a tendency to provoke conflict with the weak, as he does with Lennie. Part of Curley s bravado stems from anxiety over his new wife, who everyone widely suspects of being a tramp. He spends a great deal of time monitoring her, believing her to be off with other men when she is not under his supervision.

    The next day, George confides in Slim that he and Lennie are not cousins, but have been friends since childhood. He tells how Lennie has often gotten them into trouble. For instance, they were forced to flee their last job because Lennie tried to touch a woman’s dress and was accused of rape. Slim agrees to give Lennie one of his puppies, and Carlson continues to badger Candy to kill his old dog. When Slim agrees with Carlson, saying that death would be a welcome relief to the suffering animal, Candy gives in. Carlson, before leading the dog outside, promises to do the job painlessly.

    Lennie flees back to a pool of the Salinas River that George had designated as a meeting place should either of them get into trouble. As the men back at the ranch discover what has happened and gather together a lynch party, George joins Lennie. Much to Lennie’s surprise, George is not mad at him for doing “a bad thing.” George begins to tell Lennie the story of the farm they will have together. As he describes the rabbits that Lennie will tend, the sound of the approaching lynch party grows louder. George shoots his friend in the back of the head.

    In Of Mice and Men , George kills Lennie to spare him from a painful death at the hands of the mob. When the men on the farm find discover that Lennie has killed Curley’s wife, they set out to find him. George knows Curley will not care that Lennie’s actions were unintentional and decides to give Lennie a quick and merciful death to spare him from the suffering he would endure if left to Curley and the other farmhands.

    cybil | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator

    The novel, which takes place during the Great Depression, begins beside the Salinas River near Soledad, California, where two migrant workers, Lennie Small and George Milton, are walking on their way to a nearby ranch. They have recently escaped from a farm near Weed where Lennie, a mentally deficient yet gentle man, was wrongly accused of rape when he touched a woman to feel her soft dress.

    Crooks presents Lennie with numerous scenarios in which George won''t come back to the ranch, scenarios in which he leaves. The threats Crooks poses cover everything from George''s leaving voluntarily to dying in an accident.. but it doesn''t stop.

    George Milton and Lennie Small are friends who travel together. They both share the same dream, which is to one day own their own ranch. George is quick-witted and intelligent. He takes the parental role of looking after Lennie, a simple-minded man who in the book is described as a giant. Lennie is kind hearted with huge physical strength. He does not know how powerful he is and likes to pet animals. The other men on the ranch find their relationship unusual, they do not know of their past. George describes himself and Lennie as the loneliest guys in the world.

    George feels sorry for himself; he can see the reality of being a ranch-hand. This loneliness therefore makes both him and Lennie have a dream that motivates him to work. It is the one thing that they are living for.

  9. author
    tinymeercat747 17 Jan 2017 22:32

    Don't let the name fool you: Lennie Small is big. Unfortunately, that's about all he has going for him—that, and he's got a really good friend. So, what did Lennie do to deserve a friend like George?

    When we first meet Lennie and George, we almost can't tell them apart: "Both were dressed in denim trousers and in denim coats with brass buttons. Both wore black, shapeless hats and both carried tight blanket rolls slung over their shoulders" (1.4). They're two itinerant farmworkers, looking for work wherever they can. From a distance, there's nothing to tell either apart. But when we get closer, we see that this isn't a relationship of equals:

  10. author
    Urangoo Altangerel 18 Jan 2017 04:13

    Hello, Of Mice and Men: Lennie and George Of Mice and Men, written by John Steinbeck, is the story of two simple farm hands, Lennie Small, who incidentally, really isn t very small, and his better half, George Milton, on their quest to have "a place of their own," with plenty of furry bunnies, of course. Sound strange? Read on to get clued in. The book opens along the banks of the Salinas River a few miles south of Soledad, California. Everything is calm and beautiful, and nature is alive. The trees are green and fresh, lizards are skittering along, rabbits sit on the sand. There are no people in the scene. Suddenly, the calm is broken. Trouble is in the air. Animals begin to scatter. Two men have arrived on the scene, and the environment seems troubled by their presence. For a moment the scene becomes "lifeless." Then in walk George and Lennie. Lennie, a large, retarded, big man who has the mind of a little child, and who loves to pet soft, pretty things, and George, a little man, who has assumed the responsibility of taking care of his simpleminded friend Lennie, are walking on their way to apply for a harvesting job on a nearby farm. The two had been traveling together for quite some time now, which was very rare, because most farm workers rarely have companions, but George and Lennie have been together ever since Lennie s Aunt had passed away, and Lennie began to follow George around everywhere. Instead of hurrying to the farm that night, they stop by a stream to camp in the open, and they ll arrive at work the next morning. Why? Well, Lennie isn t very bright. George didn t want him to blow the job opportunity. The logic between waiting until morning until going to work was, that way, all the other farm hands would be out working, thus they d have a better chance of getting the job, since Lennie wouldn t have to confront to many people, which can easily make him "confused." Read more information here: http://www.oppapers.com/essays/Mice-Men-Lennie-George/1844

  11. author
    bluekoala626 18 Jan 2017 06:05

    Don''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t let the name fool you: Lennie Small is big. Unfortunately, that''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s about all he has going for him—that, and he''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s got a really good friend. So, what did Lennie do to deserve a friend like George?

    When we first meet Lennie and George, we almost can''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t tell them apart: "Both were dressed in denim trousers and in denim coats with brass buttons. Both wore black, shapeless hats and both carried tight blanket rolls slung over their shoulders" (1.4). They''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''re two itinerant farmworkers, looking for work wherever they can. From a distance, there''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s nothing to tell either apart. But when we get closer, we see that this isn''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t a relationship of equals:

    When the sound of the footsteps had died away, George turned on Lennie. "So you wasn''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t gonna say a word. You was gonna leave your big flapper shut and leave me do the talkin''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''. Damn near lost us the job."

    "Yea, you forgot. You always forget, an'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''' I got to talk you out of it." He sat down heavily on the bunk. "Now he''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s got his eye on us. Now we got to be careful and not make no slips. You keep your big flapper shut after this." He fell morosely silent. (2.56-59)

    We read the novel for my 9th grade English class, and I''''''''m supposed to be writing and essay about it right now, but oh well. It was an amazing book, though many of my classmates disliked it. The characters were impressive and I really liked old Candy. It was good for historical reference and offered a look at the depression.

    Of Mice and Men is a fantastic novel that shows how hard it was in the times of the Great Depression. The difference between Lennie and George compared to the migrant workers is that they had each other. In the novel, it shows how George takes care of Lennie who has a mental disability. Most of the migrant workers wanted to achieve the success of the American Dream that was different for every American. Lennie and George too wanted to the euphoria of achieving their American Dream. Lennie and George’s dream was to own a ranch and live off. Read more

    An old, crippled man who has lost his hand, Candy is the swamper at the ranch. He remains attached to his aging dog, who has become so weak and sickly that it depends entirely on Candy to survive. Still, when Carlson objects to the dog s smell, Candy allows Carlson to put the dog out of its misery. Candy is a passive man, unable to take any independent action. Indeed, his one major act in the book - when he offers Lennie and George money in order to buy a piece of land with them - is a means by which he can become dependent on them.

    The son of the ranch owner, Curley is a man of short stature who is nevertheless a formidable boxer. Curley is aggressive, boastful and cocky, with a volatile temper and a tendency to provoke conflict with the weak, as he does with Lennie. Part of Curley s bravado stems from anxiety over his new wife, who everyone widely suspects of being a tramp. He spends a great deal of time monitoring her, believing her to be off with other men when she is not under his supervision.

    The next day, George confides in Slim that he and Lennie are not cousins, but have been friends since childhood. He tells how Lennie has often gotten them into trouble. For instance, they were forced to flee their last job because Lennie tried to touch a woman’s dress and was accused of rape. Slim agrees to give Lennie one of his puppies, and Carlson continues to badger Candy to kill his old dog. When Slim agrees with Carlson, saying that death would be a welcome relief to the suffering animal, Candy gives in. Carlson, before leading the dog outside, promises to do the job painlessly.

    Lennie flees back to a pool of the Salinas River that George had designated as a meeting place should either of them get into trouble. As the men back at the ranch discover what has happened and gather together a lynch party, George joins Lennie. Much to Lennie’s surprise, George is not mad at him for doing “a bad thing.” George begins to tell Lennie the story of the farm they will have together. As he describes the rabbits that Lennie will tend, the sound of the approaching lynch party grows louder. George shoots his friend in the back of the head.

    In Of Mice and Men , George kills Lennie to spare him from a painful death at the hands of the mob. When the men on the farm find discover that Lennie has killed Curley’s wife, they set out to find him. George knows Curley will not care that Lennie’s actions were unintentional and decides to give Lennie a quick and merciful death to spare him from the suffering he would endure if left to Curley and the other farmhands.

    cybil | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator

  12. author
    lazycat523 18 Jan 2017 02:42

    Don''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t let the name fool you: Lennie Small is big. Unfortunately, that''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s about all he has going for him—that, and he''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s got a really good friend. So, what did Lennie do to deserve a friend like George?

    When we first meet Lennie and George, we almost can''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t tell them apart: "Both were dressed in denim trousers and in denim coats with brass buttons. Both wore black, shapeless hats and both carried tight blanket rolls slung over their shoulders" (1.4). They''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''re two itinerant farmworkers, looking for work wherever they can. From a distance, there''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s nothing to tell either apart. But when we get closer, we see that this isn''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t a relationship of equals:

    When the sound of the footsteps had died away, George turned on Lennie. "So you wasn''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t gonna say a word. You was gonna leave your big flapper shut and leave me do the talkin''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''. Damn near lost us the job."

    "Yea, you forgot. You always forget, an'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''' I got to talk you out of it." He sat down heavily on the bunk. "Now he''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s got his eye on us. Now we got to be careful and not make no slips. You keep your big flapper shut after this." He fell morosely silent. (2.56-59)

    We read the novel for my 9th grade English class, and I''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''m supposed to be writing and essay about it right now, but oh well. It was an amazing book, though many of my classmates disliked it. The characters were impressive and I really liked old Candy. It was good for historical reference and offered a look at the depression.

    Of Mice and Men is a fantastic novel that shows how hard it was in the times of the Great Depression. The difference between Lennie and George compared to the migrant workers is that they had each other. In the novel, it shows how George takes care of Lennie who has a mental disability. Most of the migrant workers wanted to achieve the success of the American Dream that was different for every American. Lennie and George too wanted to the euphoria of achieving their American Dream. Lennie and George’s dream was to own a ranch and live off. Read more

    An old, crippled man who has lost his hand, Candy is the swamper at the ranch. He remains attached to his aging dog, who has become so weak and sickly that it depends entirely on Candy to survive. Still, when Carlson objects to the dog s smell, Candy allows Carlson to put the dog out of its misery. Candy is a passive man, unable to take any independent action. Indeed, his one major act in the book - when he offers Lennie and George money in order to buy a piece of land with them - is a means by which he can become dependent on them.

    The son of the ranch owner, Curley is a man of short stature who is nevertheless a formidable boxer. Curley is aggressive, boastful and cocky, with a volatile temper and a tendency to provoke conflict with the weak, as he does with Lennie. Part of Curley s bravado stems from anxiety over his new wife, who everyone widely suspects of being a tramp. He spends a great deal of time monitoring her, believing her to be off with other men when she is not under his supervision.

    The next day, George confides in Slim that he and Lennie are not cousins, but have been friends since childhood. He tells how Lennie has often gotten them into trouble. For instance, they were forced to flee their last job because Lennie tried to touch a woman’s dress and was accused of rape. Slim agrees to give Lennie one of his puppies, and Carlson continues to badger Candy to kill his old dog. When Slim agrees with Carlson, saying that death would be a welcome relief to the suffering animal, Candy gives in. Carlson, before leading the dog outside, promises to do the job painlessly.

    Lennie flees back to a pool of the Salinas River that George had designated as a meeting place should either of them get into trouble. As the men back at the ranch discover what has happened and gather together a lynch party, George joins Lennie. Much to Lennie’s surprise, George is not mad at him for doing “a bad thing.” George begins to tell Lennie the story of the farm they will have together. As he describes the rabbits that Lennie will tend, the sound of the approaching lynch party grows louder. George shoots his friend in the back of the head.

    In Of Mice and Men , George kills Lennie to spare him from a painful death at the hands of the mob. When the men on the farm find discover that Lennie has killed Curley’s wife, they set out to find him. George knows Curley will not care that Lennie’s actions were unintentional and decides to give Lennie a quick and merciful death to spare him from the suffering he would endure if left to Curley and the other farmhands.

    cybil | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator

    The novel, which takes place during the Great Depression, begins beside the Salinas River near Soledad, California, where two migrant workers, Lennie Small and George Milton, are walking on their way to a nearby ranch. They have recently escaped from a farm near Weed where Lennie, a mentally deficient yet gentle man, was wrongly accused of rape when he touched a woman to feel her soft dress.

    Crooks presents Lennie with numerous scenarios in which George won't come back to the ranch, scenarios in which he leaves. The threats Crooks poses cover everything from George's leaving voluntarily to dying in an accident.. but it doesn't stop.

  13. author
    Кристина Бондарчук 18 Jan 2017 01:25

    Order paper here of mice and men essay lennie small

    When we first meet Lennie and George, we almost can''t tell them apart: "Both were dressed in denim trousers and in denim coats with brass buttons. Both wore black, shapeless hats and both carried tight blanket rolls slung over their shoulders" (1.4). They''re two itinerant farmworkers, looking for work wherever they can. From a distance, there''s nothing to tell either apart. But when we get closer, we see that this isn''t a relationship of equals:

    If this reminds you of a kid imitating his dad, then you''re on the right track: from these few sentences, we know that something is seriously wrong with Lennie. Like a kid, he mournfully wishes for ketchup to put on his beans; like a kid, he demands a bedtime story—even when he knows it all himself: "No…you tell it. It ain''t the same if I tell it. Go on…George. How I get to tend the rabbits" (1.121).

  14. author
    дигидра 18 Jan 2017 09:31

    Don''''''''t let the name fool you: Lennie Small is big. Unfortunately, that''''''''s about all he has going for him—that, and he''''''''s got a really good friend. So, what did Lennie do to deserve a friend like George?

    When we first meet Lennie and George, we almost can''''''''t tell them apart: "Both were dressed in denim trousers and in denim coats with brass buttons. Both wore black, shapeless hats and both carried tight blanket rolls slung over their shoulders" (1.4). They''''''''re two itinerant farmworkers, looking for work wherever they can. From a distance, there''''''''s nothing to tell either apart. But when we get closer, we see that this isn''''''''t a relationship of equals:

    When the sound of the footsteps had died away, George turned on Lennie. "So you wasn''''t gonna say a word. You was gonna leave your big flapper shut and leave me do the talkin''''. Damn near lost us the job."

    "Yea, you forgot. You always forget, an'''' I got to talk you out of it." He sat down heavily on the bunk. "Now he''''s got his eye on us. Now we got to be careful and not make no slips. You keep your big flapper shut after this." He fell morosely silent. (2.56-59)

    We read the novel for my 9th grade English class, and I'm supposed to be writing and essay about it right now, but oh well. It was an amazing book, though many of my classmates disliked it. The characters were impressive and I really liked old Candy. It was good for historical reference and offered a look at the depression.

    Of Mice and Men is a fantastic novel that shows how hard it was in the times of the Great Depression. The difference between Lennie and George compared to the migrant workers is that they had each other. In the novel, it shows how George takes care of Lennie who has a mental disability. Most of the migrant workers wanted to achieve the success of the American Dream that was different for every American. Lennie and George too wanted to the euphoria of achieving their American Dream. Lennie and George’s dream was to own a ranch and live off. Read more