15

The Crucible John Proctor Quotes Page 1 - Shmoop

18 Jan 2017 21:24 | Author: User1488070316 | Category: Latin american revolution essay

John Proctor, The Crucible 's protagonist, has some major issues. But we can see why. Back in the day, he had everything your average Puritan man could want: a farm to ceaselessly toil upon, three sons to discipline, and a wife to make a home with. Proctor was a stand-up guy who spoke his mind. Around town, his name was synonymous with honor and integrity. He took pleasure in exposing hypocrisy and was respected for it. Most importantly, John Proctor respected himself.

Enter: Abigail, the play's antagonist. This saucy young housekeeper traipsed in to John's life (while Mrs. Proctor was super ill, btw) and, before he knew it, his good life was bad, bad, bad. John made the mistake of committing adultery with her. To make things worse, it was also lechery (Proctor was in his thirties and Abigail was just seventeen—yuck). All it took was one shameful encounter to destroy John's most prized possession: his self-respect.

When we first meet John Proctor halfway through Act I, we discover a man who has become the thing he hates most in the world: a hypocrite. He is caged by guilt. The emotional weight of the play rests on Proctor's quest to regain his lost self-image, his lost goodness. In fact, it is his journey from guilt to redemption that forms the central spine of The Crucible. John Proctor is a classic Arthur Miller hero: a dude who struggles with the incompatibility of his actions with his self-image. (Willy Loman of Death of a Salesman , Eddie Carbone of A View From the Bridge , and Joe Keller of All My Sons all have similar issues.)

Comments
  1. author
    Эстер  🍀 17 Jan 2017 23:33

    Why should you care about what John Proctor says in Arthur Miller’s The Crucible? Don’t worry, we’re here to tell you.

  2. author
    pan chashyrski 18 Jan 2017 06:11

    you forgot sarah good and sarah osborn as characters in this story, even if they dont have a line, they are still part of the story and still information

    Meet John. (Hi, John!) He cheats on his wife, he can''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t remember the entire ten commandments even though he goes to church pretty much every week, he''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s more stubborn than a mule, and he''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s angry pretty much 100% of the time. He''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s also. our hero.

    John Proctor, The Crucible ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s protagonist, has some major issues. But we can see why. Back in the day, he had everything your average Puritan man could want: a farm to ceaselessly toil upon, three sons to discipline, and a wife to make a home with. Proctor was a stand-up guy who spoke his mind. Around town, his name was synonymous with honor and integrity. He took pleasure in exposing hypocrisy and was respected for it. Most importantly, John Proctor respected himself.

    The following analysis reveals a comprehensive look at the Storyform for The Crucible. Unlike most of the analysis found here which simply lists the unique individual story appreciations this in-depth study details the actual encoding for each structural item. This also means it has been incorporated into the Dramatica Story Expert application itself as an easily referenced contextual example.

    He progresses. from shame to renewed assurance. For a time his humility as an adulterer disposes him to accept the greater humiliation of confessing to witchcraft; since he has already blackened his “good name” by succumbing to and then publicly admitting lechery, he is tempted to save at least his life. Indignation, however, compels him to salvage self-respect. “How may I live without my name?”. (Moss 42)

    Proctor reveals Abigail’s true motivations, jealousy and desire, at great personal cost to himself. If had made the revelation earlier, perhaps it could have prevented the tragedy of the witch-hunt.

    Parris tries to assert his religious authority over Proctor, but Proctor is uninterested in the minister’s message. Parris suggests that there is a battle going on, a battle of good vs. evil, and Proctor is on the wrong side.

    The play is set in Salem, Massachusetts, 1692 ; the government is a theocracy rule by God through religious officials. Hard work and church consume the majority of a Salem resident’s time. Within the community, there are simmering disputes over land. Matters of boundaries and deeds are a source of constant, bitter disagreements.

    Thomas Putnam and his wife enter the room. Putnam holds one of the play’s many simmering grudges. His brother-in-law was a candidate for the Salem ministry, but a small faction thwarted his relative’s aspirations. Mrs. Putnam reports that their own daughter, Ruth, is as listless as Betty, and she claims that someone saw Betty flying over a neighbor’s barn.

    Abigail fuses together her sexual awakening ("John Proctor that took me from my sleep") and her intellectual awakening ("and put knowledge in my heart"), using the Biblical language she is accustomed to (Adam and Eve''''''''''''''''s first sin was gaining "knowledge," and in the Bible sexual intercourse is often referred to as "knowing" one''''''''''''''''s spouse). Abigail shifts swiftly back and forth between the "light" of Proctor''''''''''''''''s love and the "light" of his teaching.

    Out of fear that she will be hanged, Tituba confesses to making a compact with the Devil and says that she has seen Sarah Good and Goody Osburn with the Devil. In these closing moments of Act 1, Abigail leaps up and offers her own confession: she too has been ensnared by the Devil, but she now accuses a long list of villagers of witchcraft. Betty immediately follows Abigail''''''''''''''''s lead, offering her own confession and accusations.

    The eighteen year-old servant in the Proctor household, Mary is one of the girls found dancing in the woods and is complicit in Abigail Williams schemes. Although weak and tentative, she challenges the Proctors when they forbid her to go to court. However, Mary eventually breaks down and testifies against Abigail until Abigail charges her with witchery. She is a pliable girl whose actions are easily determined by others.

    Parris slave from Barbados, Tituba was with the girls when they danced and attempted to conjure the spirits of Ann Putnam s dead children. She is the first person accused of witchcraft and likewise the first person to accuse others of witchery - particularly when she discovers that the easiest way to spare herself is to admit to the charges no matter their truth.

    The play is set in Salem, Massachusetts in the spring of 1692, and the first act begins in a small upper bedroom of the home of Reverend Samuel Parris , who kneels in prayer at the bed of his daughter, Betty.

    Mrs. Ann Putnam and Mr. Thomas Putnam enter; she claims that Betty s illness is certainly a stroke of hell. There are rumors that Betty was flying over the Ingersoll s barn, according to Mrs. Putnam. Their daughter Ruth is also sick, and they assume witchcraft to be the cause. Mrs. Putnam admits that she sent Ruth to Tituba. She believes that Tituba knows how to speak to the dead, and she wished to learn who murdered her seven children during their infancy.

  3. author
    beautifulduck314 18 Jan 2017 05:47

    you forgot sarah good and sarah osborn as characters in this story, even if they dont have a line, they are still part of the story and still information

    Meet John. (Hi, John!) He cheats on his wife, he can''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t remember the entire ten commandments even though he goes to church pretty much every week, he''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s more stubborn than a mule, and he''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s angry pretty much 100% of the time. He''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s also. our hero.

    John Proctor, The Crucible ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s protagonist, has some major issues. But we can see why. Back in the day, he had everything your average Puritan man could want: a farm to ceaselessly toil upon, three sons to discipline, and a wife to make a home with. Proctor was a stand-up guy who spoke his mind. Around town, his name was synonymous with honor and integrity. He took pleasure in exposing hypocrisy and was respected for it. Most importantly, John Proctor respected himself.

    The following analysis reveals a comprehensive look at the Storyform for The Crucible. Unlike most of the analysis found here which simply lists the unique individual story appreciations this in-depth study details the actual encoding for each structural item. This also means it has been incorporated into the Dramatica Story Expert application itself as an easily referenced contextual example.

    He progresses. from shame to renewed assurance. For a time his humility as an adulterer disposes him to accept the greater humiliation of confessing to witchcraft; since he has already blackened his “good name” by succumbing to and then publicly admitting lechery, he is tempted to save at least his life. Indignation, however, compels him to salvage self-respect. “How may I live without my name?”. (Moss 42)

    Proctor reveals Abigail’s true motivations, jealousy and desire, at great personal cost to himself. If had made the revelation earlier, perhaps it could have prevented the tragedy of the witch-hunt.

    Parris tries to assert his religious authority over Proctor, but Proctor is uninterested in the minister’s message. Parris suggests that there is a battle going on, a battle of good vs. evil, and Proctor is on the wrong side.

    The play is set in Salem, Massachusetts, 1692 ; the government is a theocracy rule by God through religious officials. Hard work and church consume the majority of a Salem resident’s time. Within the community, there are simmering disputes over land. Matters of boundaries and deeds are a source of constant, bitter disagreements.

    Thomas Putnam and his wife enter the room. Putnam holds one of the play’s many simmering grudges. His brother-in-law was a candidate for the Salem ministry, but a small faction thwarted his relative’s aspirations. Mrs. Putnam reports that their own daughter, Ruth, is as listless as Betty, and she claims that someone saw Betty flying over a neighbor’s barn.

    Abigail fuses together her sexual awakening ("John Proctor that took me from my sleep") and her intellectual awakening ("and put knowledge in my heart"), using the Biblical language she is accustomed to (Adam and Eve''''''''s first sin was gaining "knowledge," and in the Bible sexual intercourse is often referred to as "knowing" one''''''''s spouse). Abigail shifts swiftly back and forth between the "light" of Proctor''''''''s love and the "light" of his teaching.

    Out of fear that she will be hanged, Tituba confesses to making a compact with the Devil and says that she has seen Sarah Good and Goody Osburn with the Devil. In these closing moments of Act 1, Abigail leaps up and offers her own confession: she too has been ensnared by the Devil, but she now accuses a long list of villagers of witchcraft. Betty immediately follows Abigail''''''''s lead, offering her own confession and accusations.

    The eighteen year-old servant in the Proctor household, Mary is one of the girls found dancing in the woods and is complicit in Abigail Williams schemes. Although weak and tentative, she challenges the Proctors when they forbid her to go to court. However, Mary eventually breaks down and testifies against Abigail until Abigail charges her with witchery. She is a pliable girl whose actions are easily determined by others.

    Parris slave from Barbados, Tituba was with the girls when they danced and attempted to conjure the spirits of Ann Putnam s dead children. She is the first person accused of witchcraft and likewise the first person to accuse others of witchery - particularly when she discovers that the easiest way to spare herself is to admit to the charges no matter their truth.

  4. author
    Haoose 18 Jan 2017 02:43

    you forgot sarah good and sarah osborn as characters in this story, even if they dont have a line, they are still part of the story and still information

    Meet John. (Hi, John!) He cheats on his wife, he can''''t remember the entire ten commandments even though he goes to church pretty much every week, he''''s more stubborn than a mule, and he''''s angry pretty much 100% of the time. He''''s also. our hero.

    John Proctor, The Crucible ''''s protagonist, has some major issues. But we can see why. Back in the day, he had everything your average Puritan man could want: a farm to ceaselessly toil upon, three sons to discipline, and a wife to make a home with. Proctor was a stand-up guy who spoke his mind. Around town, his name was synonymous with honor and integrity. He took pleasure in exposing hypocrisy and was respected for it. Most importantly, John Proctor respected himself.

    The following analysis reveals a comprehensive look at the Storyform for The Crucible. Unlike most of the analysis found here which simply lists the unique individual story appreciations this in-depth study details the actual encoding for each structural item. This also means it has been incorporated into the Dramatica Story Expert application itself as an easily referenced contextual example.

    He progresses. from shame to renewed assurance. For a time his humility as an adulterer disposes him to accept the greater humiliation of confessing to witchcraft; since he has already blackened his “good name” by succumbing to and then publicly admitting lechery, he is tempted to save at least his life. Indignation, however, compels him to salvage self-respect. “How may I live without my name?”. (Moss 42)

    Proctor reveals Abigail’s true motivations, jealousy and desire, at great personal cost to himself. If had made the revelation earlier, perhaps it could have prevented the tragedy of the witch-hunt.

    Parris tries to assert his religious authority over Proctor, but Proctor is uninterested in the minister’s message. Parris suggests that there is a battle going on, a battle of good vs. evil, and Proctor is on the wrong side.

  5. author
    chimgee 17 Jan 2017 22:09

    you forgot sarah good and sarah osborn as characters in this story, even if they dont have a line, they are still part of the story and still information

    Meet John. (Hi, John!) He cheats on his wife, he can''t remember the entire ten commandments even though he goes to church pretty much every week, he''s more stubborn than a mule, and he''s angry pretty much 100% of the time. He''s also. our hero.

    John Proctor, The Crucible ''s protagonist, has some major issues. But we can see why. Back in the day, he had everything your average Puritan man could want: a farm to ceaselessly toil upon, three sons to discipline, and a wife to make a home with. Proctor was a stand-up guy who spoke his mind. Around town, his name was synonymous with honor and integrity. He took pleasure in exposing hypocrisy and was respected for it. Most importantly, John Proctor respected himself.

    The following analysis reveals a comprehensive look at the Storyform for The Crucible. Unlike most of the analysis found here which simply lists the unique individual story appreciations this in-depth study details the actual encoding for each structural item. This also means it has been incorporated into the Dramatica Story Expert application itself as an easily referenced contextual example.

    He progresses... from shame to renewed assurance. For a time his humility as an adulterer disposes him to accept the greater humiliation of confessing to witchcraft; since he has already blackened his “good name” by succumbing to and then publicly admitting lechery, he is tempted to save at least his life. Indignation, however, compels him to salvage self-respect. “How may I live without my name?”... (Moss 42)

  6. author
    Forgive me, karma 18 Jan 2017 06:50

    you forgot sarah good and sarah osborn as characters in this story, even if they dont have a line, they are still part of the story and still information

    Meet John. (Hi, John!) He cheats on his wife, he can''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t remember the entire ten commandments even though he goes to church pretty much every week, he''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s more stubborn than a mule, and he''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s angry pretty much 100% of the time. He''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s also. our hero.

    John Proctor, The Crucible ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s protagonist, has some major issues. But we can see why. Back in the day, he had everything your average Puritan man could want: a farm to ceaselessly toil upon, three sons to discipline, and a wife to make a home with. Proctor was a stand-up guy who spoke his mind. Around town, his name was synonymous with honor and integrity. He took pleasure in exposing hypocrisy and was respected for it. Most importantly, John Proctor respected himself.

    The following analysis reveals a comprehensive look at the Storyform for The Crucible. Unlike most of the analysis found here which simply lists the unique individual story appreciations this in-depth study details the actual encoding for each structural item. This also means it has been incorporated into the Dramatica Story Expert application itself as an easily referenced contextual example.

    He progresses. from shame to renewed assurance. For a time his humility as an adulterer disposes him to accept the greater humiliation of confessing to witchcraft; since he has already blackened his “good name” by succumbing to and then publicly admitting lechery, he is tempted to save at least his life. Indignation, however, compels him to salvage self-respect. “How may I live without my name?”. (Moss 42)

    Proctor reveals Abigail’s true motivations, jealousy and desire, at great personal cost to himself. If had made the revelation earlier, perhaps it could have prevented the tragedy of the witch-hunt.

    Parris tries to assert his religious authority over Proctor, but Proctor is uninterested in the minister’s message. Parris suggests that there is a battle going on, a battle of good vs. evil, and Proctor is on the wrong side.

    The play is set in Salem, Massachusetts, 1692 ; the government is a theocracy rule by God through religious officials. Hard work and church consume the majority of a Salem resident’s time. Within the community, there are simmering disputes over land. Matters of boundaries and deeds are a source of constant, bitter disagreements.

    Thomas Putnam and his wife enter the room. Putnam holds one of the play’s many simmering grudges. His brother-in-law was a candidate for the Salem ministry, but a small faction thwarted his relative’s aspirations. Mrs. Putnam reports that their own daughter, Ruth, is as listless as Betty, and she claims that someone saw Betty flying over a neighbor’s barn.

    Abigail fuses together her sexual awakening ("John Proctor that took me from my sleep") and her intellectual awakening ("and put knowledge in my heart"), using the Biblical language she is accustomed to (Adam and Eve''''s first sin was gaining "knowledge," and in the Bible sexual intercourse is often referred to as "knowing" one''''s spouse). Abigail shifts swiftly back and forth between the "light" of Proctor''''s love and the "light" of his teaching.

    Out of fear that she will be hanged, Tituba confesses to making a compact with the Devil and says that she has seen Sarah Good and Goody Osburn with the Devil. In these closing moments of Act 1, Abigail leaps up and offers her own confession: she too has been ensnared by the Devil, but she now accuses a long list of villagers of witchcraft. Betty immediately follows Abigail''''s lead, offering her own confession and accusations.

    The eighteen year-old servant in the Proctor household, Mary is one of the girls found dancing in the woods and is complicit in Abigail Williams schemes. Although weak and tentative, she challenges the Proctors when they forbid her to go to court. However, Mary eventually breaks down and testifies against Abigail until Abigail charges her with witchery. She is a pliable girl whose actions are easily determined by others.

    Parris slave from Barbados, Tituba was with the girls when they danced and attempted to conjure the spirits of Ann Putnam s dead children. She is the first person accused of witchcraft and likewise the first person to accuse others of witchery - particularly when she discovers that the easiest way to spare herself is to admit to the charges no matter their truth.

  7. author
    PhillipBowden 18 Jan 2017 03:02

    This Site Might Help You. RE: How does Miller develop the character of John Proctor in the Crucible? how does miller develop john through his use of stage directions, dailogue, and commentary? like from beginning to end how does johns character change? begining middle end? thankyou!!!

  8. author
    Бомжамин` ЕГЭ 18 Jan 2017 03:46

    Go to the website Spark Notes, they usually have quotes and explain them thoroughly. Good Luck!

  9. author
    Cadman Mcgookin 18 Jan 2017 02:33

    you forgot sarah good and sarah osborn as characters in this story, even if they dont have a line, they are still part of the story and still information

    Meet John. (Hi, John!) He cheats on his wife, he can''''''''''''''''t remember the entire ten commandments even though he goes to church pretty much every week, he''''''''''''''''s more stubborn than a mule, and he''''''''''''''''s angry pretty much 100% of the time. He''''''''''''''''s also. our hero.

    John Proctor, The Crucible ''''''''''''''''s protagonist, has some major issues. But we can see why. Back in the day, he had everything your average Puritan man could want: a farm to ceaselessly toil upon, three sons to discipline, and a wife to make a home with. Proctor was a stand-up guy who spoke his mind. Around town, his name was synonymous with honor and integrity. He took pleasure in exposing hypocrisy and was respected for it. Most importantly, John Proctor respected himself.

    The following analysis reveals a comprehensive look at the Storyform for The Crucible. Unlike most of the analysis found here which simply lists the unique individual story appreciations this in-depth study details the actual encoding for each structural item. This also means it has been incorporated into the Dramatica Story Expert application itself as an easily referenced contextual example.

    He progresses. from shame to renewed assurance. For a time his humility as an adulterer disposes him to accept the greater humiliation of confessing to witchcraft; since he has already blackened his “good name” by succumbing to and then publicly admitting lechery, he is tempted to save at least his life. Indignation, however, compels him to salvage self-respect. “How may I live without my name?”. (Moss 42)

    Proctor reveals Abigail’s true motivations, jealousy and desire, at great personal cost to himself. If had made the revelation earlier, perhaps it could have prevented the tragedy of the witch-hunt.

    Parris tries to assert his religious authority over Proctor, but Proctor is uninterested in the minister’s message. Parris suggests that there is a battle going on, a battle of good vs. evil, and Proctor is on the wrong side.

    The play is set in Salem, Massachusetts, 1692 ; the government is a theocracy rule by God through religious officials. Hard work and church consume the majority of a Salem resident’s time. Within the community, there are simmering disputes over land. Matters of boundaries and deeds are a source of constant, bitter disagreements.

    Thomas Putnam and his wife enter the room. Putnam holds one of the play’s many simmering grudges. His brother-in-law was a candidate for the Salem ministry, but a small faction thwarted his relative’s aspirations. Mrs. Putnam reports that their own daughter, Ruth, is as listless as Betty, and she claims that someone saw Betty flying over a neighbor’s barn.

    Abigail fuses together her sexual awakening ("John Proctor that took me from my sleep") and her intellectual awakening ("and put knowledge in my heart"), using the Biblical language she is accustomed to (Adam and Eve's first sin was gaining "knowledge," and in the Bible sexual intercourse is often referred to as "knowing" one's spouse). Abigail shifts swiftly back and forth between the "light" of Proctor's love and the "light" of his teaching.

    Out of fear that she will be hanged, Tituba confesses to making a compact with the Devil and says that she has seen Sarah Good and Goody Osburn with the Devil. In these closing moments of Act 1, Abigail leaps up and offers her own confession: she too has been ensnared by the Devil, but she now accuses a long list of villagers of witchcraft. Betty immediately follows Abigail's lead, offering her own confession and accusations.

  10. author
    Тейсти ✨ 18 Jan 2017 00:36

    you forgot sarah good and sarah osborn as characters in this story, even if they dont have a line, they are still part of the story and still information

    Meet John. (Hi, John!) He cheats on his wife, he can''''''''t remember the entire ten commandments even though he goes to church pretty much every week, he''''''''s more stubborn than a mule, and he''''''''s angry pretty much 100% of the time. He''''''''s also. our hero.

    John Proctor, The Crucible ''''''''s protagonist, has some major issues. But we can see why. Back in the day, he had everything your average Puritan man could want: a farm to ceaselessly toil upon, three sons to discipline, and a wife to make a home with. Proctor was a stand-up guy who spoke his mind. Around town, his name was synonymous with honor and integrity. He took pleasure in exposing hypocrisy and was respected for it. Most importantly, John Proctor respected himself.

    The following analysis reveals a comprehensive look at the Storyform for The Crucible. Unlike most of the analysis found here which simply lists the unique individual story appreciations this in-depth study details the actual encoding for each structural item. This also means it has been incorporated into the Dramatica Story Expert application itself as an easily referenced contextual example.

    He progresses. from shame to renewed assurance. For a time his humility as an adulterer disposes him to accept the greater humiliation of confessing to witchcraft; since he has already blackened his “good name” by succumbing to and then publicly admitting lechery, he is tempted to save at least his life. Indignation, however, compels him to salvage self-respect. “How may I live without my name?”. (Moss 42)

    Proctor reveals Abigail’s true motivations, jealousy and desire, at great personal cost to himself. If had made the revelation earlier, perhaps it could have prevented the tragedy of the witch-hunt.

    Parris tries to assert his religious authority over Proctor, but Proctor is uninterested in the minister’s message. Parris suggests that there is a battle going on, a battle of good vs. evil, and Proctor is on the wrong side.

    The play is set in Salem, Massachusetts, 1692 ; the government is a theocracy rule by God through religious officials. Hard work and church consume the majority of a Salem resident’s time. Within the community, there are simmering disputes over land. Matters of boundaries and deeds are a source of constant, bitter disagreements.

    Thomas Putnam and his wife enter the room. Putnam holds one of the play’s many simmering grudges. His brother-in-law was a candidate for the Salem ministry, but a small faction thwarted his relative’s aspirations. Mrs. Putnam reports that their own daughter, Ruth, is as listless as Betty, and she claims that someone saw Betty flying over a neighbor’s barn.

  11. author
    счастье 18 Jan 2017 06:35

    His problem with the other people was that they were all buying into the whole witchcraft thing and blaming everyone else for being a witch. His problem was that he refused to admit to being a witch because it was against the religion to tell a lie. So they hung him.

  12. author
    blueelephant654 18 Jan 2017 05:10

    you forgot sarah good and sarah osborn as characters in this story, even if they dont have a line, they are still part of the story and still information

    Meet John. (Hi, John!) He cheats on his wife, he can''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t remember the entire ten commandments even though he goes to church pretty much every week, he''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s more stubborn than a mule, and he''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s angry pretty much 100% of the time. He''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s also. our hero.

    John Proctor, The Crucible ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s protagonist, has some major issues. But we can see why. Back in the day, he had everything your average Puritan man could want: a farm to ceaselessly toil upon, three sons to discipline, and a wife to make a home with. Proctor was a stand-up guy who spoke his mind. Around town, his name was synonymous with honor and integrity. He took pleasure in exposing hypocrisy and was respected for it. Most importantly, John Proctor respected himself.

    The following analysis reveals a comprehensive look at the Storyform for The Crucible. Unlike most of the analysis found here which simply lists the unique individual story appreciations this in-depth study details the actual encoding for each structural item. This also means it has been incorporated into the Dramatica Story Expert application itself as an easily referenced contextual example.

    He progresses. from shame to renewed assurance. For a time his humility as an adulterer disposes him to accept the greater humiliation of confessing to witchcraft; since he has already blackened his “good name” by succumbing to and then publicly admitting lechery, he is tempted to save at least his life. Indignation, however, compels him to salvage self-respect. “How may I live without my name?”. (Moss 42)

    Proctor reveals Abigail’s true motivations, jealousy and desire, at great personal cost to himself. If had made the revelation earlier, perhaps it could have prevented the tragedy of the witch-hunt.

    Parris tries to assert his religious authority over Proctor, but Proctor is uninterested in the minister’s message. Parris suggests that there is a battle going on, a battle of good vs. evil, and Proctor is on the wrong side.

    The play is set in Salem, Massachusetts, 1692 ; the government is a theocracy rule by God through religious officials. Hard work and church consume the majority of a Salem resident’s time. Within the community, there are simmering disputes over land. Matters of boundaries and deeds are a source of constant, bitter disagreements.

    Thomas Putnam and his wife enter the room. Putnam holds one of the play’s many simmering grudges. His brother-in-law was a candidate for the Salem ministry, but a small faction thwarted his relative’s aspirations. Mrs. Putnam reports that their own daughter, Ruth, is as listless as Betty, and she claims that someone saw Betty flying over a neighbor’s barn.

    Abigail fuses together her sexual awakening ("John Proctor that took me from my sleep") and her intellectual awakening ("and put knowledge in my heart"), using the Biblical language she is accustomed to (Adam and Eve''s first sin was gaining "knowledge," and in the Bible sexual intercourse is often referred to as "knowing" one''s spouse). Abigail shifts swiftly back and forth between the "light" of Proctor''s love and the "light" of his teaching.

    Out of fear that she will be hanged, Tituba confesses to making a compact with the Devil and says that she has seen Sarah Good and Goody Osburn with the Devil. In these closing moments of Act 1, Abigail leaps up and offers her own confession: she too has been ensnared by the Devil, but she now accuses a long list of villagers of witchcraft. Betty immediately follows Abigail''s lead, offering her own confession and accusations.

  13. author
    User1488056451 18 Jan 2017 03:35

    you forgot sarah good and sarah osborn as characters in this story, even if they dont have a line, they are still part of the story and still information

  14. author
    User1487946621 18 Jan 2017 01:49

    you forgot sarah good and sarah osborn as characters in this story, even if they dont have a line, they are still part of the story and still information

    Meet John. (Hi, John!) He cheats on his wife, he can't remember the entire ten commandments even though he goes to church pretty much every week, he's more stubborn than a mule, and he's angry pretty much 100% of the time. He's also. our hero.

    John Proctor, The Crucible 's protagonist, has some major issues. But we can see why. Back in the day, he had everything your average Puritan man could want: a farm to ceaselessly toil upon, three sons to discipline, and a wife to make a home with. Proctor was a stand-up guy who spoke his mind. Around town, his name was synonymous with honor and integrity. He took pleasure in exposing hypocrisy and was respected for it. Most importantly, John Proctor respected himself.