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How the Other Half Lives - smithsonianmag.com

18 Jan 2017 21:24 | Author: purplerabbit230 | Category: Data analysis phd thesis

Hidden Lives Revealed provides an intriguing encounter with children who were in the care of The Children's Society in late Victorian and early 20th Century Britain.

Comments
  1. author
    redmeercat211 18 Jan 2017 02:45

    How the Other Half Lives: Studies among the Tenements of New York (1890) was an early publication of photojournalism by Jacob Riis , documenting squalid living conditions in New York City slums in the 1880s. It served as a basis for future " muckraking " journalism by exposing the slums to New York City’s upper and middle classes. This work inspired many reforms of working-class housing, both immediately after publication as well as making a lasting impact in today''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s society.

    In the years after the Civil War, many of the former residents of the most notorious slums were wealthy enough to move out of these conditions, or had died in the war. [4] Also, the elevated railway on the Bowery in 1889 transformed this evolving neighborhood back into the squalid, seedy neighborhood it was before the war, and even made it worse. [5]

    In 1870, when Jacob August Riis immigrated to America from Denmark on the steamship Iowa , he rode in steerage with nothing but the clothes on his back, 40 borrowed dollars in his pocket, and a locket containing a single hair from the girl he loved. It must have been hard for the 21-year-old Riis to imagine that in just a few short years, he would be pallin’ around with a future president, become a pioneer in photojournalism, and help reform housing policy in New York City.

    Jacob Riis, who died 100 years ago this month, struggled through his first few years in the United States. Unable to find a steady job, he worked as a farmhand, ironworker, brick-layer, carpenter, and salesman, and experienced the worst aspects of American urbanism--crime, sickness, squalor--in the low-rent tenements and lodging houses that would eventually inspire the young Danish immigrant to dedicate himself to improving living conditions for the city’s lower-class.

  2. author
    yellowbear711 18 Jan 2017 04:39

    How the Other Half Lives: Studies among the Tenements of New York (1890) was an early publication of photojournalism by Jacob Riis , documenting squalid living conditions in New York City slums in the 1880s. It served as a basis for future " muckraking " journalism by exposing the slums to New York City’s upper and middle classes. This work inspired many reforms of working-class housing, both immediately after publication as well as making a lasting impact in today''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s society.

    In the years after the Civil War, many of the former residents of the most notorious slums were wealthy enough to move out of these conditions, or had died in the war. [4] Also, the elevated railway on the Bowery in 1889 transformed this evolving neighborhood back into the squalid, seedy neighborhood it was before the war, and even made it worse. [5]

    In 1870, when Jacob August Riis immigrated to America from Denmark on the steamship Iowa , he rode in steerage with nothing but the clothes on his back, 40 borrowed dollars in his pocket, and a locket containing a single hair from the girl he loved. It must have been hard for the 21-year-old Riis to imagine that in just a few short years, he would be pallin’ around with a future president, become a pioneer in photojournalism, and help reform housing policy in New York City.

    Jacob Riis, who died 100 years ago this month, struggled through his first few years in the United States. Unable to find a steady job, he worked as a farmhand, ironworker, brick-layer, carpenter, and salesman, and experienced the worst aspects of American urbanism--crime, sickness, squalor--in the low-rent tenements and lodging houses that would eventually inspire the young Danish immigrant to dedicate himself to improving living conditions for the city’s lower-class.

    Jacob Riis, circa 1900. Jacob A. Riis Collection, Museum of the City of New York hide caption

    In one of Jacob Riis'' most famous photos, "Five Cents a Spot," 1888–89, lodgers crowd in a Bayard Street tenement. Jacob A. Riis Collection, Museum of the City of New York hide caption

  3. author
    redelephant279 18 Jan 2017 02:40

    Order essay here how the other half lives 1890

    Hidden Lives Revealed provides an intriguing encounter with children who were in the care of The Children''s Society in late Victorian and early 20th Century Britain.

  4. author
    whiteelephant409 18 Jan 2017 04:32

    How the Other Half Lives: Studies among the Tenements of New York (1890) was an early publication of photojournalism by Jacob Riis , documenting squalid living conditions in New York City slums in the 1880s. It served as a basis for future " muckraking " journalism by exposing the slums to New York City’s upper and middle classes. This work inspired many reforms of working-class housing, both immediately after publication as well as making a lasting impact in today''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s society.

    In the years after the Civil War, many of the former residents of the most notorious slums were wealthy enough to move out of these conditions, or had died in the war. [4] Also, the elevated railway on the Bowery in 1889 transformed this evolving neighborhood back into the squalid, seedy neighborhood it was before the war, and even made it worse. [5]

    In 1870, when Jacob August Riis immigrated to America from Denmark on the steamship Iowa , he rode in steerage with nothing but the clothes on his back, 40 borrowed dollars in his pocket, and a locket containing a single hair from the girl he loved. It must have been hard for the 21-year-old Riis to imagine that in just a few short years, he would be pallin’ around with a future president, become a pioneer in photojournalism, and help reform housing policy in New York City.

    Jacob Riis, who died 100 years ago this month, struggled through his first few years in the United States. Unable to find a steady job, he worked as a farmhand, ironworker, brick-layer, carpenter, and salesman, and experienced the worst aspects of American urbanism--crime, sickness, squalor--in the low-rent tenements and lodging houses that would eventually inspire the young Danish immigrant to dedicate himself to improving living conditions for the city’s lower-class.

    Jacob Riis, circa 1900. Jacob A. Riis Collection, Museum of the City of New York hide caption

    In one of Jacob Riis' most famous photos, "Five Cents a Spot," 1888–89, lodgers crowd in a Bayard Street tenement. Jacob A. Riis Collection, Museum of the City of New York hide caption

  5. author
    Маньяк Виктор 18 Jan 2017 05:28

    How the Other Half Lives: Studies among the Tenements of New York (1890) was an early publication of photojournalism by Jacob Riis , documenting squalid living conditions in New York City slums in the 1880s. It served as a basis for future " muckraking " journalism by exposing the slums to New York City’s upper and middle classes. This work inspired many reforms of working-class housing, both immediately after publication as well as making a lasting impact in today''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s society.

    In the years after the Civil War, many of the former residents of the most notorious slums were wealthy enough to move out of these conditions, or had died in the war. [4] Also, the elevated railway on the Bowery in 1889 transformed this evolving neighborhood back into the squalid, seedy neighborhood it was before the war, and even made it worse. [5]

    In 1870, when Jacob August Riis immigrated to America from Denmark on the steamship Iowa , he rode in steerage with nothing but the clothes on his back, 40 borrowed dollars in his pocket, and a locket containing a single hair from the girl he loved. It must have been hard for the 21-year-old Riis to imagine that in just a few short years, he would be pallin’ around with a future president, become a pioneer in photojournalism, and help reform housing policy in New York City.

    Jacob Riis, who died 100 years ago this month, struggled through his first few years in the United States. Unable to find a steady job, he worked as a farmhand, ironworker, brick-layer, carpenter, and salesman, and experienced the worst aspects of American urbanism--crime, sickness, squalor--in the low-rent tenements and lodging houses that would eventually inspire the young Danish immigrant to dedicate himself to improving living conditions for the city’s lower-class.

    Jacob Riis, circa 1900. Jacob A. Riis Collection, Museum of the City of New York hide caption

    In one of Jacob Riis'''' most famous photos, "Five Cents a Spot," 1888–89, lodgers crowd in a Bayard Street tenement. Jacob A. Riis Collection, Museum of the City of New York hide caption

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    FROM WOUNDED KNEE TO SYRIA:

    Among sources used, beside news reports, are the Congressional Record (23 June 1969), 180 Landings by the U.S. Marine Corp History Division, Ege & Makhijani in Counterspy (July-Aug, 1982), Instances of Use of United States Forces Abroad, 1798-1993 by Ellen C. Collier of the Library of Congress Congressional Research Service, and Ellsberg in Protest & Survive.

  6. author
    Хоггүй МНГ Байгаль 17 Jan 2017 23:31

    john is right - look of the triangle shirt waist factor fire that happened in nyc at the turn of the century - victorian women who were poor and often imigrants were pretty much treated like cattle. The women in the stuation I am thinking of were died in a factory fire because they were locked in to thier rooms and did not have proper safety/evacuation facilities put in place in case of fire. Most of the women in that fire died because they jumped out of the 11 story windows out of desperation. Because of that fire, we all have sprinkles systems in office buildings and adequate fire excape ladders in buildings. sadly the ouners of the building were aquited in court even though it was their fault that there were all sort of dangerous working conditions that caused the fire an prevented escape from the fire.

  7. author
    bigfish617 18 Jan 2017 07:35

    How the Other Half Lives: Studies among the Tenements of New York (1890) was an early publication of photojournalism by Jacob Riis , documenting squalid living conditions in New York City slums in the 1880s. It served as a basis for future " muckraking " journalism by exposing the slums to New York City’s upper and middle classes. This work inspired many reforms of working-class housing, both immediately after publication as well as making a lasting impact in today''''''''s society.

    In the years after the Civil War, many of the former residents of the most notorious slums were wealthy enough to move out of these conditions, or had died in the war. [4] Also, the elevated railway on the Bowery in 1889 transformed this evolving neighborhood back into the squalid, seedy neighborhood it was before the war, and even made it worse. [5]

    In 1870, when Jacob August Riis immigrated to America from Denmark on the steamship Iowa , he rode in steerage with nothing but the clothes on his back, 40 borrowed dollars in his pocket, and a locket containing a single hair from the girl he loved. It must have been hard for the 21-year-old Riis to imagine that in just a few short years, he would be pallin’ around with a future president, become a pioneer in photojournalism, and help reform housing policy in New York City.

    Jacob Riis, who died 100 years ago this month, struggled through his first few years in the United States. Unable to find a steady job, he worked as a farmhand, ironworker, brick-layer, carpenter, and salesman, and experienced the worst aspects of American urbanism--crime, sickness, squalor--in the low-rent tenements and lodging houses that would eventually inspire the young Danish immigrant to dedicate himself to improving living conditions for the city’s lower-class.

  8. author
    yearning atom 18 Jan 2017 08:43

    Effort, have decided that it is too much and must come down. Another Paradise Park will take its place and let in sunlight and air to work such transformation as at.

  9. author
    brownpeacock128 18 Jan 2017 06:06

    I don t know about free, but you will have to find a very large library and look them up yourself. What you pay for with others is their research time. What you ask for is not a simple task. Data businesses that have that info, bought it in bulk and put in tons of man hours to get them. If you are willing to do the hours of searching yourself, you may be on your way to some thing. Good luck.

  10. author
    yellowlion967 18 Jan 2017 05:06

    I can tell you it wasn`t just the southern states that made you take a literacy test before you could vote. I had to take a literacy test in New York when I first voted. Even before that a person had to be a property owner as well. We`ve made great strides.

  11. author
    browncat402 18 Jan 2017 05:42

    How the Other Half Lives: Studies among the Tenements of New York (1890) was an early publication of photojournalism by Jacob Riis , documenting squalid living conditions in New York City slums in the 1880s. It served as a basis for future " muckraking " journalism by exposing the slums to New York City’s upper and middle classes. This work inspired many reforms of working-class housing, both immediately after publication as well as making a lasting impact in today''''''''''''''''s society.

    In the years after the Civil War, many of the former residents of the most notorious slums were wealthy enough to move out of these conditions, or had died in the war. [4] Also, the elevated railway on the Bowery in 1889 transformed this evolving neighborhood back into the squalid, seedy neighborhood it was before the war, and even made it worse. [5]

    In 1870, when Jacob August Riis immigrated to America from Denmark on the steamship Iowa , he rode in steerage with nothing but the clothes on his back, 40 borrowed dollars in his pocket, and a locket containing a single hair from the girl he loved. It must have been hard for the 21-year-old Riis to imagine that in just a few short years, he would be pallin’ around with a future president, become a pioneer in photojournalism, and help reform housing policy in New York City.

    Jacob Riis, who died 100 years ago this month, struggled through his first few years in the United States. Unable to find a steady job, he worked as a farmhand, ironworker, brick-layer, carpenter, and salesman, and experienced the worst aspects of American urbanism--crime, sickness, squalor--in the low-rent tenements and lodging houses that would eventually inspire the young Danish immigrant to dedicate himself to improving living conditions for the city’s lower-class.