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Moral Dilemma - Friesian School

18 Jan 2017 21:24 | Author: beautifulrabbit679 | Category: Introduction premarital sex term paper

In Book I of Plato's Republic , Cephalus defines ‘justice’ as speaking the truth and paying one's debts. Socrates quickly refutes this account by suggesting that it would be wrong to repay certain debts for example, to return a borrowed weapon to a friend who is not in his right mind. Socrates' point is not that repaying debts is without moral import; rather, he wants to show that it is not always right to repay one's debts, at least not exactly when the one to whom the debt is owed demands repayment. What we have here is a conflict between two moral norms: repaying one's debts and protecting others from harm. And in this case, Socrates maintains that protecting others from harm is the norm that takes priority.

Nearly twenty-four centuries later, Jean-Paul Sartre described a moral conflict the resolution of which was, to many, less obvious than the resolution to the Platonic conflict. Sartre (1957) tells of a student whose brother had been killed in the German offensive of 1940. The student wanted to avenge his brother and to fight forces that he regarded as evil. But the student's mother was living with him, and he was her one consolation in life. The student believed that he had conflicting obligations. Sartre describes him as being torn between two kinds of morality: one of limited scope but certain efficacy, personal devotion to his mother; the other of much wider scope but uncertain efficacy, attempting to contribute to the defeat of an unjust aggressor.

Comments
  1. author
    organicgorilla212 17 Jan 2017 23:48

    Nelson Mandela is a big fish in the field, (we will brush over the train he blew up) Rosa Parks is an impressive one, Mr Luther King Junior, Abraham Lincoln and Winston Churchill. OK I know it is Sunday but Jesus gave his life for us, that is a big time one if you ride the religion thing. Just an idea, but if you go into any of the holy books of the various religions you will find them packed with these types.

  2. author
    User1489390280 18 Jan 2017 04:02

    While the examples from Plato and Sartre are the ones most commonly cited, it should be clear that there are many others. If a person makes conflicting promises, she faces a moral conflict. Physicians and families who believe that human life should not be deliberately shortened and that unpreventable pain should not be tolerated face a conflict in deciding whether to withdraw life support from a dying patient.

    What is common to the two well-known cases is conflict. In each case, an agent regards herself as having moral reasons to do each of two actions, but doing both actions is not possible. Ethicists have called situations like these moral dilemmas. The crucial features of a moral dilemma are these: the agent is required to do each of two (or more) actions; the agent can do each of the actions; but the agent cannot do both (or all) of the actions. The agent thus seems condemned to moral failure; no matter what she does, she will do something wrong (or fail to do something that she ought to do).

    The Bible reveals chronological details about the 7 years just prior to the return of Jesus to rule and reign the earth. What can it tell us about events predicted to happen just prior to the resurection and rapture of the church? What 5 things should we be doing to prepare for this time?

    Nearly every denomination across America is dividing into to two types of churches. Which one are you a part of, and why is this happening? Is this something Jesus predicted would happen? Marquis discusses the things that cause churches to split, and the focus every church needs to maintain unity.

    Ethical Dilemmas for Classroom Discussion
    THE DAILY DILEMMA ARCHIVE
    by Charis Denison

    This is an archive of moral & ethical discussion starters from the case files of Charis Denison. It presents a variety of age-appropriate, real-life dilemmas that usually ignite intense student discussions. These are just synopses. When you see something that looks interesting (and they all are), just click on the number and you''''''''''''''''ll get the full story, notes for the facilitator (that''''''''''''''''s you), and challenging discussion questions.

  3. author
    qうぇrty 18 Jan 2017 02:30

    While the examples from Plato and Sartre are the ones most commonly cited, it should be clear that there are many others. If a person makes conflicting promises, she faces a moral conflict. Physicians and families who believe that human life should not be deliberately shortened and that unpreventable pain should not be tolerated face a conflict in deciding whether to withdraw life support from a dying patient.

    What is common to the two well-known cases is conflict. In each case, an agent regards herself as having moral reasons to do each of two actions, but doing both actions is not possible. Ethicists have called situations like these moral dilemmas. The crucial features of a moral dilemma are these: the agent is required to do each of two (or more) actions; the agent can do each of the actions; but the agent cannot do both (or all) of the actions. The agent thus seems condemned to moral failure; no matter what she does, she will do something wrong (or fail to do something that she ought to do).

    The Bible reveals chronological details about the 7 years just prior to the return of Jesus to rule and reign the earth. What can it tell us about events predicted to happen just prior to the resurection and rapture of the church? What 5 things should we be doing to prepare for this time?

    Nearly every denomination across America is dividing into to two types of churches. Which one are you a part of, and why is this happening? Is this something Jesus predicted would happen? Marquis discusses the things that cause churches to split, and the focus every church needs to maintain unity.

    Ethical Dilemmas for Classroom Discussion
    THE DAILY DILEMMA ARCHIVE
    by Charis Denison

    This is an archive of moral & ethical discussion starters from the case files of Charis Denison. It presents a variety of age-appropriate, real-life dilemmas that usually ignite intense student discussions. These are just synopses. When you see something that looks interesting (and they all are), just click on the number and you''''ll get the full story, notes for the facilitator (that''''s you), and challenging discussion questions.

  4. author
    sophia 17 Jan 2017 23:03

    Writing the Ethical Dilemma Paper.. is lengthier than an essay, the moral dilemmas to be handled are. One example of such a dilemma is the recent drone attacks.

  5. author
    User1489646008 18 Jan 2017 01:42

    While the examples from Plato and Sartre are the ones most commonly cited, it should be clear that there are many others. If a person makes conflicting promises, she faces a moral conflict. Physicians and families who believe that human life should not be deliberately shortened and that unpreventable pain should not be tolerated face a conflict in deciding whether to withdraw life support from a dying patient.

    What is common to the two well-known cases is conflict. In each case, an agent regards herself as having moral reasons to do each of two actions, but doing both actions is not possible. Ethicists have called situations like these moral dilemmas. The crucial features of a moral dilemma are these: the agent is required to do each of two (or more) actions; the agent can do each of the actions; but the agent cannot do both (or all) of the actions. The agent thus seems condemned to moral failure; no matter what she does, she will do something wrong (or fail to do something that she ought to do).

    The Bible reveals chronological details about the 7 years just prior to the return of Jesus to rule and reign the earth. What can it tell us about events predicted to happen just prior to the resurection and rapture of the church? What 5 things should we be doing to prepare for this time?

    Nearly every denomination across America is dividing into to two types of churches. Which one are you a part of, and why is this happening? Is this something Jesus predicted would happen? Marquis discusses the things that cause churches to split, and the focus every church needs to maintain unity.

    Ethical Dilemmas for Classroom Discussion
    THE DAILY DILEMMA ARCHIVE
    by Charis Denison

    This is an archive of moral & ethical discussion starters from the case files of Charis Denison. It presents a variety of age-appropriate, real-life dilemmas that usually ignite intense student discussions. These are just synopses. When you see something that looks interesting (and they all are), just click on the number and you''ll get the full story, notes for the facilitator (that''s you), and challenging discussion questions.

  6. author
    хэстэр |-/ 18 Jan 2017 01:18

    While the examples from Plato and Sartre are the ones most commonly cited, it should be clear that there are many others. If a person makes conflicting promises, she faces a moral conflict. Physicians and families who believe that human life should not be deliberately shortened and that unpreventable pain should not be tolerated face a conflict in deciding whether to withdraw life support from a dying patient.

    What is common to the two well-known cases is conflict. In each case, an agent regards herself as having moral reasons to do each of two actions, but doing both actions is not possible. Ethicists have called situations like these moral dilemmas. The crucial features of a moral dilemma are these: the agent is required to do each of two (or more) actions; the agent can do each of the actions; but the agent cannot do both (or all) of the actions. The agent thus seems condemned to moral failure; no matter what she does, she will do something wrong (or fail to do something that she ought to do).

  7. author
    User1490830989 18 Jan 2017 04:59

    the best example of an ethical dilemma is the double fault situation. follows: a woman is in a nazi death camp. she has two children aged 5 and 10. the nazis tell her she must choose ONE child to live and the other will be killed. the question of ethics here becomes one dealing with how does she choose which child should live. another example is that of teleological vs deontological. is it okay to lie if the outcome of the lie is good, or is it always wrong to lie?

  8. author
    heavymouse388 17 Jan 2017 23:16

    Click here examples of a moral dilemma essay

    In Book I of Plato''s Republic , Cephalus defines ‘justice’ as speaking the truth and paying one''s debts. Socrates quickly refutes this account by suggesting that it would be wrong to repay certain debts for example, to return a borrowed weapon to a friend who is not in his right mind. Socrates'' point is not that repaying debts is without moral import; rather, he wants to show that it is not always right to repay one''s debts, at least not exactly when the one to whom the debt is owed demands repayment. What we have here is a conflict between two moral norms: repaying one''s debts and protecting others from harm. And in this case, Socrates maintains that protecting others from harm is the norm that takes priority.

    Nearly twenty-four centuries later, Jean-Paul Sartre described a moral conflict the resolution of which was, to many, less obvious than the resolution to the Platonic conflict. Sartre (1957) tells of a student whose brother had been killed in the German offensive of 1940. The student wanted to avenge his brother and to fight forces that he regarded as evil. But the student''s mother was living with him, and he was her one consolation in life. The student believed that he had conflicting obligations. Sartre describes him as being torn between two kinds of morality: one of limited scope but certain efficacy, personal devotion to his mother; the other of much wider scope but uncertain efficacy, attempting to contribute to the defeat of an unjust aggressor.

  9. author
    User1489610032 17 Jan 2017 23:45

    While the examples from Plato and Sartre are the ones most commonly cited, it should be clear that there are many others. If a person makes conflicting promises, she faces a moral conflict. Physicians and families who believe that human life should not be deliberately shortened and that unpreventable pain should not be tolerated face a conflict in deciding whether to withdraw life support from a dying patient.

    What is common to the two well-known cases is conflict. In each case, an agent regards herself as having moral reasons to do each of two actions, but doing both actions is not possible. Ethicists have called situations like these moral dilemmas. The crucial features of a moral dilemma are these: the agent is required to do each of two (or more) actions; the agent can do each of the actions; but the agent cannot do both (or all) of the actions. The agent thus seems condemned to moral failure; no matter what she does, she will do something wrong (or fail to do something that she ought to do).

    The Bible reveals chronological details about the 7 years just prior to the return of Jesus to rule and reign the earth. What can it tell us about events predicted to happen just prior to the resurection and rapture of the church? What 5 things should we be doing to prepare for this time?

    Nearly every denomination across America is dividing into to two types of churches. Which one are you a part of, and why is this happening? Is this something Jesus predicted would happen? Marquis discusses the things that cause churches to split, and the focus every church needs to maintain unity.

    Ethical Dilemmas for Classroom Discussion
    THE DAILY DILEMMA ARCHIVE
    by Charis Denison

    This is an archive of moral & ethical discussion starters from the case files of Charis Denison. It presents a variety of age-appropriate, real-life dilemmas that usually ignite intense student discussions. These are just synopses. When you see something that looks interesting (and they all are), just click on the number and you''''''''ll get the full story, notes for the facilitator (that''''''''s you), and challenging discussion questions.

  10. author
    brownbird242 18 Jan 2017 08:03

    While the examples from Plato and Sartre are the ones most commonly cited, it should be clear that there are many others. If a person makes conflicting promises, she faces a moral conflict. Physicians and families who believe that human life should not be deliberately shortened and that unpreventable pain should not be tolerated face a conflict in deciding whether to withdraw life support from a dying patient.

    What is common to the two well-known cases is conflict. In each case, an agent regards herself as having moral reasons to do each of two actions, but doing both actions is not possible. Ethicists have called situations like these moral dilemmas. The crucial features of a moral dilemma are these: the agent is required to do each of two (or more) actions; the agent can do each of the actions; but the agent cannot do both (or all) of the actions. The agent thus seems condemned to moral failure; no matter what she does, she will do something wrong (or fail to do something that she ought to do).

    The Bible reveals chronological details about the 7 years just prior to the return of Jesus to rule and reign the earth. What can it tell us about events predicted to happen just prior to the resurection and rapture of the church? What 5 things should we be doing to prepare for this time?

    Nearly every denomination across America is dividing into to two types of churches. Which one are you a part of, and why is this happening? Is this something Jesus predicted would happen? Marquis discusses the things that cause churches to split, and the focus every church needs to maintain unity.

  11. author
    User1490186412 18 Jan 2017 02:02

    The admission committee wants to know about your morals. The topic (the specific ethical dilemma) is really irrelevant. Don t sound trivial and don t sound closed minded. Write about who you are and what you believe. Good Luck!

  12. author
    User1491527111 18 Jan 2017 01:56

    While the examples from Plato and Sartre are the ones most commonly cited, it should be clear that there are many others. If a person makes conflicting promises, she faces a moral conflict. Physicians and families who believe that human life should not be deliberately shortened and that unpreventable pain should not be tolerated face a conflict in deciding whether to withdraw life support from a dying patient.

    What is common to the two well-known cases is conflict. In each case, an agent regards herself as having moral reasons to do each of two actions, but doing both actions is not possible. Ethicists have called situations like these moral dilemmas. The crucial features of a moral dilemma are these: the agent is required to do each of two (or more) actions; the agent can do each of the actions; but the agent cannot do both (or all) of the actions. The agent thus seems condemned to moral failure; no matter what she does, she will do something wrong (or fail to do something that she ought to do).

    The Bible reveals chronological details about the 7 years just prior to the return of Jesus to rule and reign the earth. What can it tell us about events predicted to happen just prior to the resurection and rapture of the church? What 5 things should we be doing to prepare for this time?

    Nearly every denomination across America is dividing into to two types of churches. Which one are you a part of, and why is this happening? Is this something Jesus predicted would happen? Marquis discusses the things that cause churches to split, and the focus every church needs to maintain unity.

    Ethical Dilemmas for Classroom Discussion
    THE DAILY DILEMMA ARCHIVE
    by Charis Denison

    This is an archive of moral & ethical discussion starters from the case files of Charis Denison. It presents a variety of age-appropriate, real-life dilemmas that usually ignite intense student discussions. These are just synopses. When you see something that looks interesting (and they all are), just click on the number and you'll get the full story, notes for the facilitator (that's you), and challenging discussion questions.