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SparkNotes: Flowers for Algernon

18 Jan 2017 21:24 | Author: lazybird623 | Category: Best technical resume template

Hi Grandma, I actually have a few questions. First is about age. I am 22 and I want to have a kid, but I’m not sure that I’m ready for one just yet.

Comments
  1. author
    goldenleopard181 17 Jan 2017 22:43

    Flowers for Algernon is told in a first-person narration so that readers follow Charlie in a close perspective. What is the effect of this first-person narration? What does it tell that other perspectives might not tell? Why do you think the author chose to make Charlie a first-person narrator?

    The story is delivered in an epistolary fashion, that is, conveyed in Progress Reports styled like diary entries. What is the effect of this narrative choice? Why do you think the author chose to tell the story this way?

    1. How does the diary or journal-entry form of the novel affect the emphasis of the narrative? Is Charlie dependable as a narrator as he progresses through his various stages? Is Charlie capable of providing insight into the other characters, or is he too preoccupied with himself?

    2. How has Charlie changed at the end of the novel? Is he different from the person he is at the beginning of the novel, and if so, how? Do you consider the novel’s ending to be tragic or inspiring?

    Flowers for Algernon is a science fiction short story and subsequent novel written by Daniel Keyes. The short story, written in 1958 and first published in the April 1959 issue of The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction , won the Hugo Award for Best Short Story in 1960. [2] The novel was published in 1966 and was joint winner of that year''''s Nebula Award for Best Novel (with Babel-17 ). [3]

    The eponymous Algernon is a laboratory mouse who has undergone surgery to increase his intelligence by artificial means. The story is told by a series of progress reports written by Charlie Gordon, the first human test subject for the surgery, and it touches upon many different ethical and moral themes such as the treatment of the mentally disabled. [4] [5]

    Charlie''s "friends" laughed at him because he was cognitively impaired, and in the beginning, he wasn''t really sure why so he just laughed along with them.

    What kind of a menial task is this? How does acing this quiz show any kind of deep reading comprehension? Memorizing the plot is so darn-diggity shallow that I would be ashamed to answer these questions.

    The white laboratory mouse who was the original test of the experiment that was later performed on Charlie. This mouse becomes three times as smart as all other mice and is able to solve complex puzzles.

    Charlie's teacher in his literature class for mentally disabled adults who is impressed by his hard work and motivation. She recommends him for the procedure originally, and oversees that he is doing well in the hands of the scientists throughout the book. She is the only woman who Charlie loves while he is intelligent, and it is only for a brief period.

  2. author
    Елена Павлова 18 Jan 2017 08:14

    Flowers for Algernon is told in a first-person narration so that readers follow Charlie in a close perspective. What is the effect of this first-person narration? What does it tell that other perspectives might not tell? Why do you think the author chose to make Charlie a first-person narrator?

    The story is delivered in an epistolary fashion, that is, conveyed in Progress Reports styled like diary entries. What is the effect of this narrative choice? Why do you think the author chose to tell the story this way?

    1. How does the diary or journal-entry form of the novel affect the emphasis of the narrative? Is Charlie dependable as a narrator as he progresses through his various stages? Is Charlie capable of providing insight into the other characters, or is he too preoccupied with himself?

    2. How has Charlie changed at the end of the novel? Is he different from the person he is at the beginning of the novel, and if so, how? Do you consider the novel’s ending to be tragic or inspiring?

    Flowers for Algernon is a science fiction short story and subsequent novel written by Daniel Keyes. The short story, written in 1958 and first published in the April 1959 issue of The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction , won the Hugo Award for Best Short Story in 1960. [2] The novel was published in 1966 and was joint winner of that year''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s Nebula Award for Best Novel (with Babel-17 ). [3]

    The eponymous Algernon is a laboratory mouse who has undergone surgery to increase his intelligence by artificial means. The story is told by a series of progress reports written by Charlie Gordon, the first human test subject for the surgery, and it touches upon many different ethical and moral themes such as the treatment of the mentally disabled. [4] [5]

    Charlie''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s "friends" laughed at him because he was cognitively impaired, and in the beginning, he wasn''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t really sure why so he just laughed along with them.

    What kind of a menial task is this? How does acing this quiz show any kind of deep reading comprehension? Memorizing the plot is so darn-diggity shallow that I would be ashamed to answer these questions.

    The white laboratory mouse who was the original test of the experiment that was later performed on Charlie. This mouse becomes three times as smart as all other mice and is able to solve complex puzzles.

    Charlie''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s teacher in his literature class for mentally disabled adults who is impressed by his hard work and motivation. She recommends him for the procedure originally, and oversees that he is doing well in the hands of the scientists throughout the book. She is the only woman who Charlie loves while he is intelligent, and it is only for a brief period.

    These two are basically the same people, which is to say that they''''''''''''''''re basically bad news. They pretend to be Charlie''''''''''''''''s friends while they secretly make fun of him behind his back, and they love getting him drunk for entertainment purposes. As soon as Charlie gets smart enough to realize what''''''''''''''''s going on, they turn on him with Gimpy and get him fired. Nice going, guys.

    But we''''''''''''''''ve got to hand it to them: they come to Charlie''''''''''''''''s rescue at the end, when he''''''''''''''''s vulnerable and getting picked on by the new bakery employee, Klaus. Charlie tells us they stand up for him and shake Klaus down a little bit. So yeah, we''''''''''''''''ll grudgingly give it to them that they redeem themselves a bit by the end. But we can''''''''''''''''t help but wonder if they think it''''''''''''''''s only okay to make fun of Charlie when they do it themselves—and that logic doesn''''''''''''''''t work on anyone, least of all us.

  3. author
    crazytiger316 18 Jan 2017 00:08

    Total cost = Supply Cost + Utility Cost Cost = (5x³ + x - 4) + (8x - 7) To do this, all you need to remember to do is add like terms. This basically means adding things with like powers together until it s as simplified as it can possibly be. Cost = 5x³ + x - 4 + 8x - 7 = 5x³ + 9x - 11

  4. author
    smalldog669 18 Jan 2017 02:33

    All the topics seem pretty good, except I find that it is kinda hard to write number one compared to the other three. Topic #2 is a good topic because you can really go in-depth with the question and there are lots of different examples in the novel. For example, you could say that intelligence plays a very important role in human life because other humans such as Charlie s "friends" really look up to those with a high intelligence. Topic #3 is also easy to write because it s not looking for much, just a simple compare and contrast, which will be easy to find when you look for examples. Topic #4 is also easy because as Algernon gets smarter, so does Charlie, but when Algernon s brain begins to deteriorate, eventually so does Charlie s. I would probably recommend Topic #3 the most since it looks the easiest.

  5. author
    User1487913535 17 Jan 2017 23:06

    Flowers for Algernon is told in a first-person narration so that readers follow Charlie in a close perspective. What is the effect of this first-person narration? What does it tell that other perspectives might not tell? Why do you think the author chose to make Charlie a first-person narrator?

    The story is delivered in an epistolary fashion, that is, conveyed in Progress Reports styled like diary entries. What is the effect of this narrative choice? Why do you think the author chose to tell the story this way?

    1. How does the diary or journal-entry form of the novel affect the emphasis of the narrative? Is Charlie dependable as a narrator as he progresses through his various stages? Is Charlie capable of providing insight into the other characters, or is he too preoccupied with himself?

    2. How has Charlie changed at the end of the novel? Is he different from the person he is at the beginning of the novel, and if so, how? Do you consider the novel’s ending to be tragic or inspiring?

    Flowers for Algernon is a science fiction short story and subsequent novel written by Daniel Keyes. The short story, written in 1958 and first published in the April 1959 issue of The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction , won the Hugo Award for Best Short Story in 1960. [2] The novel was published in 1966 and was joint winner of that year''''''''s Nebula Award for Best Novel (with Babel-17 ). [3]

    The eponymous Algernon is a laboratory mouse who has undergone surgery to increase his intelligence by artificial means. The story is told by a series of progress reports written by Charlie Gordon, the first human test subject for the surgery, and it touches upon many different ethical and moral themes such as the treatment of the mentally disabled. [4] [5]

    Charlie''''s "friends" laughed at him because he was cognitively impaired, and in the beginning, he wasn''''t really sure why so he just laughed along with them.

    What kind of a menial task is this? How does acing this quiz show any kind of deep reading comprehension? Memorizing the plot is so darn-diggity shallow that I would be ashamed to answer these questions.

    The white laboratory mouse who was the original test of the experiment that was later performed on Charlie. This mouse becomes three times as smart as all other mice and is able to solve complex puzzles.

    Charlie''s teacher in his literature class for mentally disabled adults who is impressed by his hard work and motivation. She recommends him for the procedure originally, and oversees that he is doing well in the hands of the scientists throughout the book. She is the only woman who Charlie loves while he is intelligent, and it is only for a brief period.

    These two are basically the same people, which is to say that they're basically bad news. They pretend to be Charlie's friends while they secretly make fun of him behind his back, and they love getting him drunk for entertainment purposes. As soon as Charlie gets smart enough to realize what's going on, they turn on him with Gimpy and get him fired. Nice going, guys.

    But we've got to hand it to them: they come to Charlie's rescue at the end, when he's vulnerable and getting picked on by the new bakery employee, Klaus. Charlie tells us they stand up for him and shake Klaus down a little bit. So yeah, we'll grudgingly give it to them that they redeem themselves a bit by the end. But we can't help but wonder if they think it's only okay to make fun of Charlie when they do it themselves—and that logic doesn't work on anyone, least of all us.

  6. author
    crazykoala150 18 Jan 2017 01:39

    Flowers for Algernon is told in a first-person narration so that readers follow Charlie in a close perspective. What is the effect of this first-person narration? What does it tell that other perspectives might not tell? Why do you think the author chose to make Charlie a first-person narrator?

    The story is delivered in an epistolary fashion, that is, conveyed in Progress Reports styled like diary entries. What is the effect of this narrative choice? Why do you think the author chose to tell the story this way?

    1. How does the diary or journal-entry form of the novel affect the emphasis of the narrative? Is Charlie dependable as a narrator as he progresses through his various stages? Is Charlie capable of providing insight into the other characters, or is he too preoccupied with himself?

    2. How has Charlie changed at the end of the novel? Is he different from the person he is at the beginning of the novel, and if so, how? Do you consider the novel’s ending to be tragic or inspiring?

    Flowers for Algernon is a science fiction short story and subsequent novel written by Daniel Keyes. The short story, written in 1958 and first published in the April 1959 issue of The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction , won the Hugo Award for Best Short Story in 1960. [2] The novel was published in 1966 and was joint winner of that year''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s Nebula Award for Best Novel (with Babel-17 ). [3]

    The eponymous Algernon is a laboratory mouse who has undergone surgery to increase his intelligence by artificial means. The story is told by a series of progress reports written by Charlie Gordon, the first human test subject for the surgery, and it touches upon many different ethical and moral themes such as the treatment of the mentally disabled. [4] [5]

    Charlie''''''''''''''''s "friends" laughed at him because he was cognitively impaired, and in the beginning, he wasn''''''''''''''''t really sure why so he just laughed along with them.

    What kind of a menial task is this? How does acing this quiz show any kind of deep reading comprehension? Memorizing the plot is so darn-diggity shallow that I would be ashamed to answer these questions.

    The white laboratory mouse who was the original test of the experiment that was later performed on Charlie. This mouse becomes three times as smart as all other mice and is able to solve complex puzzles.

    Charlie''''''''s teacher in his literature class for mentally disabled adults who is impressed by his hard work and motivation. She recommends him for the procedure originally, and oversees that he is doing well in the hands of the scientists throughout the book. She is the only woman who Charlie loves while he is intelligent, and it is only for a brief period.

    These two are basically the same people, which is to say that they''''re basically bad news. They pretend to be Charlie''''s friends while they secretly make fun of him behind his back, and they love getting him drunk for entertainment purposes. As soon as Charlie gets smart enough to realize what''''s going on, they turn on him with Gimpy and get him fired. Nice going, guys.

    But we''''ve got to hand it to them: they come to Charlie''''s rescue at the end, when he''''s vulnerable and getting picked on by the new bakery employee, Klaus. Charlie tells us they stand up for him and shake Klaus down a little bit. So yeah, we''''ll grudgingly give it to them that they redeem themselves a bit by the end. But we can''''t help but wonder if they think it''''s only okay to make fun of Charlie when they do it themselves—and that logic doesn''''t work on anyone, least of all us.

  7. author
    Бароз Мартын 17 Jan 2017 23:23

    Flowers for Algernon is told in a first-person narration so that readers follow Charlie in a close perspective. What is the effect of this first-person narration? What does it tell that other perspectives might not tell? Why do you think the author chose to make Charlie a first-person narrator?

    The story is delivered in an epistolary fashion, that is, conveyed in Progress Reports styled like diary entries. What is the effect of this narrative choice? Why do you think the author chose to tell the story this way?

    1. How does the diary or journal-entry form of the novel affect the emphasis of the narrative? Is Charlie dependable as a narrator as he progresses through his various stages? Is Charlie capable of providing insight into the other characters, or is he too preoccupied with himself?

    2. How has Charlie changed at the end of the novel? Is he different from the person he is at the beginning of the novel, and if so, how? Do you consider the novel’s ending to be tragic or inspiring?

  8. author
    blackfrog947 18 Jan 2017 05:29

    total cost=2x²-3x-2+(4x-6) =2x²-3x-2+4x-6 =2x²+x-8

  9. author
    име_имам 18 Jan 2017 02:30

    Flowers for Algernon is told in a first-person narration so that readers follow Charlie in a close perspective. What is the effect of this first-person narration? What does it tell that other perspectives might not tell? Why do you think the author chose to make Charlie a first-person narrator?

    The story is delivered in an epistolary fashion, that is, conveyed in Progress Reports styled like diary entries. What is the effect of this narrative choice? Why do you think the author chose to tell the story this way?

    1. How does the diary or journal-entry form of the novel affect the emphasis of the narrative? Is Charlie dependable as a narrator as he progresses through his various stages? Is Charlie capable of providing insight into the other characters, or is he too preoccupied with himself?

    2. How has Charlie changed at the end of the novel? Is he different from the person he is at the beginning of the novel, and if so, how? Do you consider the novel’s ending to be tragic or inspiring?

    Flowers for Algernon is a science fiction short story and subsequent novel written by Daniel Keyes. The short story, written in 1958 and first published in the April 1959 issue of The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction , won the Hugo Award for Best Short Story in 1960. [2] The novel was published in 1966 and was joint winner of that year''''''''''''''''s Nebula Award for Best Novel (with Babel-17 ). [3]

    The eponymous Algernon is a laboratory mouse who has undergone surgery to increase his intelligence by artificial means. The story is told by a series of progress reports written by Charlie Gordon, the first human test subject for the surgery, and it touches upon many different ethical and moral themes such as the treatment of the mentally disabled. [4] [5]

    Charlie''''''''s "friends" laughed at him because he was cognitively impaired, and in the beginning, he wasn''''''''t really sure why so he just laughed along with them.

    What kind of a menial task is this? How does acing this quiz show any kind of deep reading comprehension? Memorizing the plot is so darn-diggity shallow that I would be ashamed to answer these questions.

    The white laboratory mouse who was the original test of the experiment that was later performed on Charlie. This mouse becomes three times as smart as all other mice and is able to solve complex puzzles.

    Charlie''''s teacher in his literature class for mentally disabled adults who is impressed by his hard work and motivation. She recommends him for the procedure originally, and oversees that he is doing well in the hands of the scientists throughout the book. She is the only woman who Charlie loves while he is intelligent, and it is only for a brief period.

    These two are basically the same people, which is to say that they''re basically bad news. They pretend to be Charlie''s friends while they secretly make fun of him behind his back, and they love getting him drunk for entertainment purposes. As soon as Charlie gets smart enough to realize what''s going on, they turn on him with Gimpy and get him fired. Nice going, guys.

    But we''ve got to hand it to them: they come to Charlie''s rescue at the end, when he''s vulnerable and getting picked on by the new bakery employee, Klaus. Charlie tells us they stand up for him and shake Klaus down a little bit. So yeah, we''ll grudgingly give it to them that they redeem themselves a bit by the end. But we can''t help but wonder if they think it''s only okay to make fun of Charlie when they do it themselves—and that logic doesn''t work on anyone, least of all us.

  10. author
    goldenpanda436 18 Jan 2017 02:16

    Flowers for Algernon is told in a first-person narration so that readers follow Charlie in a close perspective. What is the effect of this first-person narration? What does it tell that other perspectives might not tell? Why do you think the author chose to make Charlie a first-person narrator?

    The story is delivered in an epistolary fashion, that is, conveyed in Progress Reports styled like diary entries. What is the effect of this narrative choice? Why do you think the author chose to tell the story this way?

    1. How does the diary or journal-entry form of the novel affect the emphasis of the narrative? Is Charlie dependable as a narrator as he progresses through his various stages? Is Charlie capable of providing insight into the other characters, or is he too preoccupied with himself?

    2. How has Charlie changed at the end of the novel? Is he different from the person he is at the beginning of the novel, and if so, how? Do you consider the novel’s ending to be tragic or inspiring?

    Flowers for Algernon is a science fiction short story and subsequent novel written by Daniel Keyes. The short story, written in 1958 and first published in the April 1959 issue of The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction , won the Hugo Award for Best Short Story in 1960. [2] The novel was published in 1966 and was joint winner of that year''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s Nebula Award for Best Novel (with Babel-17 ). [3]

    The eponymous Algernon is a laboratory mouse who has undergone surgery to increase his intelligence by artificial means. The story is told by a series of progress reports written by Charlie Gordon, the first human test subject for the surgery, and it touches upon many different ethical and moral themes such as the treatment of the mentally disabled. [4] [5]

    Charlie''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s "friends" laughed at him because he was cognitively impaired, and in the beginning, he wasn''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t really sure why so he just laughed along with them.

    What kind of a menial task is this? How does acing this quiz show any kind of deep reading comprehension? Memorizing the plot is so darn-diggity shallow that I would be ashamed to answer these questions.

    The white laboratory mouse who was the original test of the experiment that was later performed on Charlie. This mouse becomes three times as smart as all other mice and is able to solve complex puzzles.

    Charlie''''''''''''''''s teacher in his literature class for mentally disabled adults who is impressed by his hard work and motivation. She recommends him for the procedure originally, and oversees that he is doing well in the hands of the scientists throughout the book. She is the only woman who Charlie loves while he is intelligent, and it is only for a brief period.

    These two are basically the same people, which is to say that they''''''''re basically bad news. They pretend to be Charlie''''''''s friends while they secretly make fun of him behind his back, and they love getting him drunk for entertainment purposes. As soon as Charlie gets smart enough to realize what''''''''s going on, they turn on him with Gimpy and get him fired. Nice going, guys.

    But we''''''''ve got to hand it to them: they come to Charlie''''''''s rescue at the end, when he''''''''s vulnerable and getting picked on by the new bakery employee, Klaus. Charlie tells us they stand up for him and shake Klaus down a little bit. So yeah, we''''''''ll grudgingly give it to them that they redeem themselves a bit by the end. But we can''''''''t help but wonder if they think it''''''''s only okay to make fun of Charlie when they do it themselves—and that logic doesn''''''''t work on anyone, least of all us.

  11. author
    lazymeercat225 17 Jan 2017 22:03

    Flowers for Algernon is told in a first-person narration so that readers follow Charlie in a close perspective. What is the effect of this first-person narration? What does it tell that other perspectives might not tell? Why do you think the author chose to make Charlie a first-person narrator?

    The story is delivered in an epistolary fashion, that is, conveyed in Progress Reports styled like diary entries. What is the effect of this narrative choice? Why do you think the author chose to tell the story this way?

  12. author
    orangepeacock609 18 Jan 2017 02:09

    Flowers for Algernon is told in a first-person narration so that readers follow Charlie in a close perspective. What is the effect of this first-person narration? What does it tell that other perspectives might not tell? Why do you think the author chose to make Charlie a first-person narrator?

    The story is delivered in an epistolary fashion, that is, conveyed in Progress Reports styled like diary entries. What is the effect of this narrative choice? Why do you think the author chose to tell the story this way?

    1. How does the diary or journal-entry form of the novel affect the emphasis of the narrative? Is Charlie dependable as a narrator as he progresses through his various stages? Is Charlie capable of providing insight into the other characters, or is he too preoccupied with himself?

    2. How has Charlie changed at the end of the novel? Is he different from the person he is at the beginning of the novel, and if so, how? Do you consider the novel’s ending to be tragic or inspiring?

    Flowers for Algernon is a science fiction short story and subsequent novel written by Daniel Keyes. The short story, written in 1958 and first published in the April 1959 issue of The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction , won the Hugo Award for Best Short Story in 1960. [2] The novel was published in 1966 and was joint winner of that year's Nebula Award for Best Novel (with Babel-17 ). [3]

    The eponymous Algernon is a laboratory mouse who has undergone surgery to increase his intelligence by artificial means. The story is told by a series of progress reports written by Charlie Gordon, the first human test subject for the surgery, and it touches upon many different ethical and moral themes such as the treatment of the mentally disabled. [4] [5]

  13. author
    organicgorilla310 18 Jan 2017 05:02

    Suggested essay topics and study questions for Daniel Keyes's Flowers for Algernon. Perfect for students who have to write Flowers for Algernon essays.

  14. author
    yellowgorilla943 18 Jan 2017 01:17

    Flowers for Algernon is told in a first-person narration so that readers follow Charlie in a close perspective. What is the effect of this first-person narration? What does it tell that other perspectives might not tell? Why do you think the author chose to make Charlie a first-person narrator?

    The story is delivered in an epistolary fashion, that is, conveyed in Progress Reports styled like diary entries. What is the effect of this narrative choice? Why do you think the author chose to tell the story this way?

    1. How does the diary or journal-entry form of the novel affect the emphasis of the narrative? Is Charlie dependable as a narrator as he progresses through his various stages? Is Charlie capable of providing insight into the other characters, or is he too preoccupied with himself?

    2. How has Charlie changed at the end of the novel? Is he different from the person he is at the beginning of the novel, and if so, how? Do you consider the novel’s ending to be tragic or inspiring?

    Flowers for Algernon is a science fiction short story and subsequent novel written by Daniel Keyes. The short story, written in 1958 and first published in the April 1959 issue of The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction , won the Hugo Award for Best Short Story in 1960. [2] The novel was published in 1966 and was joint winner of that year''s Nebula Award for Best Novel (with Babel-17 ). [3]

    The eponymous Algernon is a laboratory mouse who has undergone surgery to increase his intelligence by artificial means. The story is told by a series of progress reports written by Charlie Gordon, the first human test subject for the surgery, and it touches upon many different ethical and moral themes such as the treatment of the mentally disabled. [4] [5]

    Charlie's "friends" laughed at him because he was cognitively impaired, and in the beginning, he wasn't really sure why so he just laughed along with them.

    What kind of a menial task is this? How does acing this quiz show any kind of deep reading comprehension? Memorizing the plot is so darn-diggity shallow that I would be ashamed to answer these questions.