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Opening Receptions - Chicago Gallery News - Events

18 Jan 2017 21:24 | Author: heavyduck462 | Category: Restaurant server resume sample

Wading into the controversy surrounding an Islamic center planned for a site near New York City’s Ground Zero memorial this past August, President Obama declared: “This is America. And our commitment to religious freedom must be unshakeable. The principle that people of all faiths are welcome in this country and that they will not be treated differently by their government is essential to who we are.” In doing so, he paid homage to a vision that politicians and preachers have extolled for more than two centuries that America historically has been a place of religious tolerance. It was a sentiment George Washington voiced shortly after taking the oath of office just a few blocks from Ground Zero.

In the storybook version most of us learned in school, the Pilgrims came to America aboard the Mayflower in search of religious freedom in 1620. The Puritans soon followed, for the same reason. Ever since these religious dissidents arrived at their shining “city upon a hill,” as their governor John Winthrop called it, millions from around the world have done the same, coming to an America where they found a welcome melting pot in which everyone was free to practice his or her own faith.

Comments
  1. author
    redbear932 18 Jan 2017 04:18

    My friend, dont worry. Think about the reasons each group of people came to the area. The goal of most people in the chesapeake was to earn money. They were digging for gold/ planting cash crops. The land allowed them to plant lots of food and slavery was used as labor. They did anything to survive and make money. Many New Englanders came for religious tolerance. Religion controlled their lives and became their laws. Their soil was horrible; rocky & poor nutrition. They could not grow anything. Your textbook has more info. Good luck on your essay.

  2. author
    smallbear510 18 Jan 2017 09:28

    Having three main purposes: to disseminate accurate religious information, to expose religious fraud, hatred and misinformation, and to disseminate information on.

  3. author
    bluemouse566 17 Jan 2017 23:28

    In the storybook version most of us learned in school, the Pilgrims came to America aboard the Mayflower in search of religious freedom in 1620. The Puritans soon followed, for the same reason. Ever since these religious dissidents arrived at their shining “city upon a hill,” as their governor John Winthrop called it, millions from around the world have done the same, coming to an America where they found a welcome melting pot in which everyone was free to practice his or her own faith.

    The problem is that this tidy narrative is an American myth. The real story of religion in America’s past is an often awkward, frequently embarrassing and occasionally bloody tale that most civics books and high-school texts either paper over or shunt to the side. And much of the recent conversation about America’s ideal of religious freedom has paid lip service to this comforting tableau.

    Some have traced the Christmas tree back at least as far as the Prophet Jeremiah who wrote the book Jeremiah in the Hebrew Scriptures (Old Testament).

    Opposition to the Christmas tree was intense in past centuries. The early Christian Church in the third century CE strictly prohibited the decoration of their houses with evergreen boughs. The decorated Christmas tree only caught on in the mid-19th century.

  4. author
    прот. Сергий Рыжов 17 Jan 2017 23:36

    This isn t a complete edit - I would recommend using something other than Yahoo answers for that. But here are a couple comments for you. First, I don t know precisely what this is written for. Is it a response to a specific question (Do you consider yourself patriotic?) on an application? Or is it an essay you intend to use for all your applications in general? If the second, you need to make it more personal and less informational. If the first, though, that s a good balance. Also, the overall idea is well structured. As an atheist, I have to admit I became immediately skeptical when I read your first paragraph about how your religious identity contributed to your patriotism and so forth. But by the end, I was agreeing with you. That is definitely the sign of a good essay. So, a small breakdown of grammar by paragraph: par.1: "New World" should be capitalized. "adamant to include" is incorrect - use "adamant about including" or choose a different word than adamant. Typo - "liberty to choose", not "liberty to chose." Typo - "a crucial facet", not "a crucial faucet." par.2: Capitalize "despite!" "or lack of there of" is wrong - just say "or lack thereof." "achieved" isn t wrong per say, but it feels awkward. "that has not or will not be." you need to say "that has not been or will not be." The list in the next sentence is inconsistent - you need to format each part of the list in the same way. Starting the next sentence with "however" implies that the second clause will contradict the first, and it doesn t. Again - "vital facet" not faucet. Don t say "of A society and government" - just "of society and government." It should be "Of the more than 190," not "Of the over 190," and "less than half," not "not half." Also, tolerate isn t strictly wrong, but is again a little awkward. For the next sentence I would suggest ".every religion, but this toleration has been a core." And again, the use of sweltering isn t wrong, precisely, but it feels like an awkward deviation from the style of the rest of the essay. I would find a different word than "launched" if it was me. par.3: The first sentence should be, "Worn down by her strictly Catholic Texan family, my mother has never been one to attend church service on Sundays, or even Christmas." Enthralled with, not enthralled in. ".such as Judaism, Mormonism." would be better than ".like Judaism, Mormonism." Don t start the next sentence with "It was not until" - that implies the sentence is going places it doesn t. "despite my mother s consistent complaints" - the possessive needs an apostrophe! And are you sure consistent is the word you want there? It is not a synonym for constant. I really like the idea of religious ADD! That is a great touch. "rendered" is wrong - it does not work as a synonym for "made" here. Your grammar is inconsistent in the next sentence - say "not to mention alter my practices." It would be better to say "study and practice the religion of my choice" than "any religion of my choice." "epiphany" is wrong - perhaps you meant "epitome"? Don t capitalize freedom after the hyphen. Your final sentence is a good note, but the phrase "the freedom and liberty that is everything America stands for" is awkward - try to find another way to say that. In conclusion, the grammar and little details could use rewriting. But overall, I think it s a pretty good essay. Good luck on your applications!

  5. author
    smallpanda422 18 Jan 2017 07:46

    In the storybook version most of us learned in school, the Pilgrims came to America aboard the Mayflower in search of religious freedom in 1620. The Puritans soon followed, for the same reason. Ever since these religious dissidents arrived at their shining “city upon a hill,” as their governor John Winthrop called it, millions from around the world have done the same, coming to an America where they found a welcome melting pot in which everyone was free to practice his or her own faith.

    The problem is that this tidy narrative is an American myth. The real story of religion in America’s past is an often awkward, frequently embarrassing and occasionally bloody tale that most civics books and high-school texts either paper over or shunt to the side. And much of the recent conversation about America’s ideal of religious freedom has paid lip service to this comforting tableau.

    Some have traced the Christmas tree back at least as far as the Prophet Jeremiah who wrote the book Jeremiah in the Hebrew Scriptures (Old Testament).

    Opposition to the Christmas tree was intense in past centuries. The early Christian Church in the third century CE strictly prohibited the decoration of their houses with evergreen boughs. The decorated Christmas tree only caught on in the mid-19th century.

    In other words there is no racial evidence of any such Indo-Aryan invasion of India but only of a continuity of the same group of people who traditionally considered themselves to be Aryans.The Indo-Aryan invasion as an academic concept in 18th and 19th century Europe reflected the cultural milieu of the period. Linguistic data were used to validate the concept that in turn was used to interpret archeological and anthropological data. 2

    During the first few centuries CE, many sects were created, each dedicated to a specific deity. Typical among these were the Goddesses Shakti and Lakshmi, and the Gods Skanda and Surya.

  6. author
    purplesnake630 18 Jan 2017 03:07

    In the storybook version most of us learned in school, the Pilgrims came to America aboard the Mayflower in search of religious freedom in 1620. The Puritans soon followed, for the same reason. Ever since these religious dissidents arrived at their shining “city upon a hill,” as their governor John Winthrop called it, millions from around the world have done the same, coming to an America where they found a welcome melting pot in which everyone was free to practice his or her own faith.

    The problem is that this tidy narrative is an American myth. The real story of religion in America’s past is an often awkward, frequently embarrassing and occasionally bloody tale that most civics books and high-school texts either paper over or shunt to the side. And much of the recent conversation about America’s ideal of religious freedom has paid lip service to this comforting tableau.

    Some have traced the Christmas tree back at least as far as the Prophet Jeremiah who wrote the book Jeremiah in the Hebrew Scriptures (Old Testament).

    Opposition to the Christmas tree was intense in past centuries. The early Christian Church in the third century CE strictly prohibited the decoration of their houses with evergreen boughs. The decorated Christmas tree only caught on in the mid-19th century.

    In other words there is no racial evidence of any such Indo-Aryan invasion of India but only of a continuity of the same group of people who traditionally considered themselves to be Aryans.The Indo-Aryan invasion as an academic concept in 18th and 19th century Europe reflected the cultural milieu of the period. Linguistic data were used to validate the concept that in turn was used to interpret archeological and anthropological data. 2

    During the first few centuries CE, many sects were created, each dedicated to a specific deity. Typical among these were the Goddesses Shakti and Lakshmi, and the Gods Skanda and Surya.

    America's Byways® is the umbrella term we use for the collection of 150 distinct and diverse roads designated by the U.S. Secretary of Transportation. America's Byways include the National Scenic Byways and All-American Roads.

    America's Byways are gateways to adventures where no two experiences are the same. The National Scenic Byways Program invites you to Come Closer to America's heart and soul..

  7. author
    lazymouse485 17 Jan 2017 23:28

    Slaves were doing the same during colonial times as they were in 1865 when the 13th amendment freed them.

  8. author
    heavyswan845 17 Jan 2017 22:29

    In the storybook version most of us learned in school, the Pilgrims came to America aboard the Mayflower in search of religious freedom in 1620. The Puritans soon followed, for the same reason. Ever since these religious dissidents arrived at their shining “city upon a hill,” as their governor John Winthrop called it, millions from around the world have done the same, coming to an America where they found a welcome melting pot in which everyone was free to practice his or her own faith.

    The problem is that this tidy narrative is an American myth. The real story of religion in America’s past is an often awkward, frequently embarrassing and occasionally bloody tale that most civics books and high-school texts either paper over or shunt to the side. And much of the recent conversation about America’s ideal of religious freedom has paid lip service to this comforting tableau.

  9. author
    велди 17 Jan 2017 22:03

    In the storybook version most of us learned in school, the Pilgrims came to America aboard the Mayflower in search of religious freedom in 1620. The Puritans soon followed, for the same reason. Ever since these religious dissidents arrived at their shining “city upon a hill,” as their governor John Winthrop called it, millions from around the world have done the same, coming to an America where they found a welcome melting pot in which everyone was free to practice his or her own faith.

    The problem is that this tidy narrative is an American myth. The real story of religion in America’s past is an often awkward, frequently embarrassing and occasionally bloody tale that most civics books and high-school texts either paper over or shunt to the side. And much of the recent conversation about America’s ideal of religious freedom has paid lip service to this comforting tableau.

    Some have traced the Christmas tree back at least as far as the Prophet Jeremiah who wrote the book Jeremiah in the Hebrew Scriptures (Old Testament).

    Opposition to the Christmas tree was intense in past centuries. The early Christian Church in the third century CE strictly prohibited the decoration of their houses with evergreen boughs. The decorated Christmas tree only caught on in the mid-19th century.

    In other words there is no racial evidence of any such Indo-Aryan invasion of India but only of a continuity of the same group of people who traditionally considered themselves to be Aryans.The Indo-Aryan invasion as an academic concept in 18th and 19th century Europe reflected the cultural milieu of the period. Linguistic data were used to validate the concept that in turn was used to interpret archeological and anthropological data. 2

    During the first few centuries CE, many sects were created, each dedicated to a specific deity. Typical among these were the Goddesses Shakti and Lakshmi, and the Gods Skanda and Surya.

    America''s Byways® is the umbrella term we use for the collection of 150 distinct and diverse roads designated by the U.S. Secretary of Transportation. America''s Byways include the National Scenic Byways and All-American Roads.

    America''s Byways are gateways to adventures where no two experiences are the same. The National Scenic Byways Program invites you to Come Closer to America''s heart and soul..

  10. author
    н о в и ц к а я 18 Jan 2017 03:03