15

The Math Behind the Term "Natural Increase" - thoughtco.com

18 Jan 2017 21:24 | Author: User1492042268 | Category: Best technical resume template

The book An Essay on the Principle of Population was first published anonymously in 1798, [1] but the author was soon identified as Thomas Robert Malthus. The book predicted a grim future, as population would increase geometrically, doubling every 25 years, [2] but food production would only grow arithmetically, which would result in famine and starvation, unless births were controlled. [2]

While it was not the first book on population, it was revised for over 28 years and has been acknowledged as the most influential work of its era. Malthus's book fuelled debate about the size of the population in the Kingdom of Great Britain and contributed to the passing of the Census Act 1800. This Act enabled the holding of a national census in England, Wales and Scotland, starting in 1801 and continuing every ten years to the present. The book's 6th edition (1826) was independently cited as a key influence by both Charles Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace in developing the theory of natural selection.

Comments
  1. author
    User1490242339 18 Jan 2017 09:25

    Political: Countries with stable governments tend to have a high population density e.g. Singapore: Unstable countries tend to have lower population densities as.

  2. author
    User1488070316 18 Jan 2017 00:22

    With increase in population, you have an increase need for housing, food, sanitation, schools, jobs, and raw materials to create all these. All this puts a strain on the limited amount of space and only gets worse with the population growth.

  3. author
    usagi 18 Jan 2017 06:50

    The book An Essay on the Principle of Population was first published anonymously in 1798, [1] but the author was soon identified as Thomas Robert Malthus. The book predicted a grim future, as population would increase geometrically, doubling every 25 years, [2] but food production would only grow arithmetically, which would result in famine and starvation, unless births were controlled. [2]

    A key portion of the book was dedicated to what is now known as Malthus'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''' Iron Law of Population. This name itself is retrospective, based on the iron law of wages , which is the reformulation of Malthus'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''' position by Ferdinand Lassalle , who in turn derived the name from Goethe ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s "great, eternal iron laws" in Das Göttliche. [3] This theory suggested that growing population rates would contribute to a rising supply of labour that would inevitably lower wages. In essence, Malthus feared that continued population growth would lend itself to poverty and famine.

    Population Distribution
    Population distribution means the pattern of where people live. World population distribution is uneven. Places which are sparsely populated contain few people. Places which are densely populated contain many people. Sparsely populated places tend to be difficult places to live. These are usually places with hostile environments e.g. Antarctica. Places which are densely populated are habitable environments e.g. Europe.

    Population Density
    Population density is a measurement of the number of people in an area. It is an average number. Population density is calculated by dividing the number of people by area. Population density is usually shown as the number of people per square kilometer. The map below is a choropleth (shading) map and illustrates population density. The darker the colour the greater the population density.

    Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) Applies to the most advanced stages of HIV infection. It is defined by the occurrence of any of more than 20 opportunistic infections or HIV-related cancers.

    Age-Dependency Ratio The ratio of persons in the ages defined as dependent (under 15 years and over 64 years) to persons in the ages defined as economically productive (15-64 years) in a population.

    India accounts just 2.4 per cent of the world surface, but it supports and sustains a whopping 16.7 per cent of the world population.

    The population of India, as recorded at each decennial census from 1901 has grown steadily except for a decrease during 1911-21. Decadal growth of population from 1901 is shown in table 1.

    Paul Andersen explains how ecosystems interact with biotic and abiotic factors. He explains and gives examples of food chains and food webs. He shows how limiting factors eventually leads to logistic growth. Real data from Yellowstone Park is used to show how populations interact.

  4. author
    purpleladybug633 18 Jan 2017 03:48

    The book An Essay on the Principle of Population was first published anonymously in 1798, [1] but the author was soon identified as Thomas Robert Malthus. The book predicted a grim future, as population would increase geometrically, doubling every 25 years, [2] but food production would only grow arithmetically, which would result in famine and starvation, unless births were controlled. [2]

    A key portion of the book was dedicated to what is now known as Malthus'''' Iron Law of Population. This name itself is retrospective, based on the iron law of wages , which is the reformulation of Malthus'''' position by Ferdinand Lassalle , who in turn derived the name from Goethe ''''s "great, eternal iron laws" in Das Göttliche. [3] This theory suggested that growing population rates would contribute to a rising supply of labour that would inevitably lower wages. In essence, Malthus feared that continued population growth would lend itself to poverty and famine.

    Population Distribution
    Population distribution means the pattern of where people live. World population distribution is uneven. Places which are sparsely populated contain few people. Places which are densely populated contain many people. Sparsely populated places tend to be difficult places to live. These are usually places with hostile environments e.g. Antarctica. Places which are densely populated are habitable environments e.g. Europe.

    Population Density
    Population density is a measurement of the number of people in an area. It is an average number. Population density is calculated by dividing the number of people by area. Population density is usually shown as the number of people per square kilometer. The map below is a choropleth (shading) map and illustrates population density. The darker the colour the greater the population density.

  5. author
    センダマンε(。•︿•。)з @マウゴリ 18 Jan 2017 04:47

    The book An Essay on the Principle of Population was first published anonymously in 1798, [1] but the author was soon identified as Thomas Robert Malthus. The book predicted a grim future, as population would increase geometrically, doubling every 25 years, [2] but food production would only grow arithmetically, which would result in famine and starvation, unless births were controlled. [2]

    A key portion of the book was dedicated to what is now known as Malthus'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''' Iron Law of Population. This name itself is retrospective, based on the iron law of wages , which is the reformulation of Malthus'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''' position by Ferdinand Lassalle , who in turn derived the name from Goethe ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s "great, eternal iron laws" in Das Göttliche. [3] This theory suggested that growing population rates would contribute to a rising supply of labour that would inevitably lower wages. In essence, Malthus feared that continued population growth would lend itself to poverty and famine.

    Population Distribution
    Population distribution means the pattern of where people live. World population distribution is uneven. Places which are sparsely populated contain few people. Places which are densely populated contain many people. Sparsely populated places tend to be difficult places to live. These are usually places with hostile environments e.g. Antarctica. Places which are densely populated are habitable environments e.g. Europe.

    Population Density
    Population density is a measurement of the number of people in an area. It is an average number. Population density is calculated by dividing the number of people by area. Population density is usually shown as the number of people per square kilometer. The map below is a choropleth (shading) map and illustrates population density. The darker the colour the greater the population density.

    Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) Applies to the most advanced stages of HIV infection. It is defined by the occurrence of any of more than 20 opportunistic infections or HIV-related cancers.

    Age-Dependency Ratio The ratio of persons in the ages defined as dependent (under 15 years and over 64 years) to persons in the ages defined as economically productive (15-64 years) in a population.

    India accounts just 2.4 per cent of the world surface, but it supports and sustains a whopping 16.7 per cent of the world population.

    The population of India, as recorded at each decennial census from 1901 has grown steadily except for a decrease during 1911-21. Decadal growth of population from 1901 is shown in table 1.

    Paul Andersen explains how ecosystems interact with biotic and abiotic factors. He explains and gives examples of food chains and food webs. He shows how limiting factors eventually leads to logistic growth. Real data from Yellowstone Park is used to show how populations interact.

    The term "natural increase," refers to population increases. So far, so good. But as economists use the term, the result could be negative. And who s to say what s natural?

    "Natural increase" is a term used in economics, geography, sociology and population studies. In simplest terms, it is the birth rate minus the death rate. Birth rate in this context almost always refers to the annual number of births per thousand in a given population.

  6. author
    heavygorilla946 18 Jan 2017 05:34

    The book An Essay on the Principle of Population was first published anonymously in 1798, [1] but the author was soon identified as Thomas Robert Malthus. The book predicted a grim future, as population would increase geometrically, doubling every 25 years, [2] but food production would only grow arithmetically, which would result in famine and starvation, unless births were controlled. [2]

    A key portion of the book was dedicated to what is now known as Malthus'' Iron Law of Population. This name itself is retrospective, based on the iron law of wages , which is the reformulation of Malthus'' position by Ferdinand Lassalle , who in turn derived the name from Goethe ''s "great, eternal iron laws" in Das Göttliche. [3] This theory suggested that growing population rates would contribute to a rising supply of labour that would inevitably lower wages. In essence, Malthus feared that continued population growth would lend itself to poverty and famine.

    Population Distribution
    Population distribution means the pattern of where people live. World population distribution is uneven. Places which are sparsely populated contain few people. Places which are densely populated contain many people. Sparsely populated places tend to be difficult places to live. These are usually places with hostile environments e.g. Antarctica. Places which are densely populated are habitable environments e.g. Europe.

    Population Density
    Population density is a measurement of the number of people in an area. It is an average number. Population density is calculated by dividing the number of people by area. Population density is usually shown as the number of people per square kilometer. The map below is a choropleth (shading) map and illustrates population density. The darker the colour the greater the population density.

  7. author
    smallpeacock938 18 Jan 2017 00:27

    The book An Essay on the Principle of Population was first published anonymously in 1798, [1] but the author was soon identified as Thomas Robert Malthus. The book predicted a grim future, as population would increase geometrically, doubling every 25 years, [2] but food production would only grow arithmetically, which would result in famine and starvation, unless births were controlled. [2]

    A key portion of the book was dedicated to what is now known as Malthus'''''''' Iron Law of Population. This name itself is retrospective, based on the iron law of wages , which is the reformulation of Malthus'''''''' position by Ferdinand Lassalle , who in turn derived the name from Goethe ''''''''s "great, eternal iron laws" in Das Göttliche. [3] This theory suggested that growing population rates would contribute to a rising supply of labour that would inevitably lower wages. In essence, Malthus feared that continued population growth would lend itself to poverty and famine.

    Population Distribution
    Population distribution means the pattern of where people live. World population distribution is uneven. Places which are sparsely populated contain few people. Places which are densely populated contain many people. Sparsely populated places tend to be difficult places to live. These are usually places with hostile environments e.g. Antarctica. Places which are densely populated are habitable environments e.g. Europe.

    Population Density
    Population density is a measurement of the number of people in an area. It is an average number. Population density is calculated by dividing the number of people by area. Population density is usually shown as the number of people per square kilometer. The map below is a choropleth (shading) map and illustrates population density. The darker the colour the greater the population density.

    Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) Applies to the most advanced stages of HIV infection. It is defined by the occurrence of any of more than 20 opportunistic infections or HIV-related cancers.

    Age-Dependency Ratio The ratio of persons in the ages defined as dependent (under 15 years and over 64 years) to persons in the ages defined as economically productive (15-64 years) in a population.

  8. author
    User1487962121 17 Jan 2017 23:36

    The book An Essay on the Principle of Population was first published anonymously in 1798, [1] but the author was soon identified as Thomas Robert Malthus. The book predicted a grim future, as population would increase geometrically, doubling every 25 years, [2] but food production would only grow arithmetically, which would result in famine and starvation, unless births were controlled. [2]

    A key portion of the book was dedicated to what is now known as Malthus'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''' Iron Law of Population. This name itself is retrospective, based on the iron law of wages , which is the reformulation of Malthus'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''' position by Ferdinand Lassalle , who in turn derived the name from Goethe ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s "great, eternal iron laws" in Das Göttliche. [3] This theory suggested that growing population rates would contribute to a rising supply of labour that would inevitably lower wages. In essence, Malthus feared that continued population growth would lend itself to poverty and famine.

    Population Distribution
    Population distribution means the pattern of where people live. World population distribution is uneven. Places which are sparsely populated contain few people. Places which are densely populated contain many people. Sparsely populated places tend to be difficult places to live. These are usually places with hostile environments e.g. Antarctica. Places which are densely populated are habitable environments e.g. Europe.

    Population Density
    Population density is a measurement of the number of people in an area. It is an average number. Population density is calculated by dividing the number of people by area. Population density is usually shown as the number of people per square kilometer. The map below is a choropleth (shading) map and illustrates population density. The darker the colour the greater the population density.

    Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) Applies to the most advanced stages of HIV infection. It is defined by the occurrence of any of more than 20 opportunistic infections or HIV-related cancers.

    Age-Dependency Ratio The ratio of persons in the ages defined as dependent (under 15 years and over 64 years) to persons in the ages defined as economically productive (15-64 years) in a population.

    India accounts just 2.4 per cent of the world surface, but it supports and sustains a whopping 16.7 per cent of the world population.

    The population of India, as recorded at each decennial census from 1901 has grown steadily except for a decrease during 1911-21. Decadal growth of population from 1901 is shown in table 1.

    Paul Andersen explains how ecosystems interact with biotic and abiotic factors. He explains and gives examples of food chains and food webs. He shows how limiting factors eventually leads to logistic growth. Real data from Yellowstone Park is used to show how populations interact.

  9. author
    crazygorilla672 18 Jan 2017 03:11

    I did similar on plant diversity & population density a few yrs back. I went to local library and the web and got the names of local species. I then took photos of most and labled them. Also i walked out a grid and wrote down what &how many of each species. You could compare species mix and concentration differences between 2 lakes with similar or different climate or write about a duck or fish species that is either increasing or decreasing in nb over time and discuss why. ie - impact of people, new species (Carp) loss of another species etc. G day and good writing mate from Australia.

  10. author
    blackfish527 18 Jan 2017 02:56

    c. natural disaster. Climate and weather (assuming they are different) affect less and more dense populations equally (I assume the question does not ask for tertiary effects like energy consumption). Predation is pretty silly. Nowhere in the world today is any significantly large population affected by predation, and if they were, it would not increase with population density, so (c) is the only logical answer. It is also correct, because natural disasters are generally local, and the higher the local population density, the greater the mortality and other effects.

  11. author
    tinytiger470 17 Jan 2017 23:33

    The book An Essay on the Principle of Population was first published anonymously in 1798, [1] but the author was soon identified as Thomas Robert Malthus. The book predicted a grim future, as population would increase geometrically, doubling every 25 years, [2] but food production would only grow arithmetically, which would result in famine and starvation, unless births were controlled. [2]

    A key portion of the book was dedicated to what is now known as Malthus'''''''''''''''' Iron Law of Population. This name itself is retrospective, based on the iron law of wages , which is the reformulation of Malthus'''''''''''''''' position by Ferdinand Lassalle , who in turn derived the name from Goethe ''''''''''''''''s "great, eternal iron laws" in Das Göttliche. [3] This theory suggested that growing population rates would contribute to a rising supply of labour that would inevitably lower wages. In essence, Malthus feared that continued population growth would lend itself to poverty and famine.

    Population Distribution
    Population distribution means the pattern of where people live. World population distribution is uneven. Places which are sparsely populated contain few people. Places which are densely populated contain many people. Sparsely populated places tend to be difficult places to live. These are usually places with hostile environments e.g. Antarctica. Places which are densely populated are habitable environments e.g. Europe.

    Population Density
    Population density is a measurement of the number of people in an area. It is an average number. Population density is calculated by dividing the number of people by area. Population density is usually shown as the number of people per square kilometer. The map below is a choropleth (shading) map and illustrates population density. The darker the colour the greater the population density.

    Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) Applies to the most advanced stages of HIV infection. It is defined by the occurrence of any of more than 20 opportunistic infections or HIV-related cancers.

    Age-Dependency Ratio The ratio of persons in the ages defined as dependent (under 15 years and over 64 years) to persons in the ages defined as economically productive (15-64 years) in a population.

    India accounts just 2.4 per cent of the world surface, but it supports and sustains a whopping 16.7 per cent of the world population.

    The population of India, as recorded at each decennial census from 1901 has grown steadily except for a decrease during 1911-21. Decadal growth of population from 1901 is shown in table 1.

  12. author
    User1490334724 18 Jan 2017 05:07

    The book An Essay on the Principle of Population was first published anonymously in 1798, [1] but the author was soon identified as Thomas Robert Malthus. The book predicted a grim future, as population would increase geometrically, doubling every 25 years, [2] but food production would only grow arithmetically, which would result in famine and starvation, unless births were controlled. [2]

    A key portion of the book was dedicated to what is now known as Malthus'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''' Iron Law of Population. This name itself is retrospective, based on the iron law of wages , which is the reformulation of Malthus'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''' position by Ferdinand Lassalle , who in turn derived the name from Goethe ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s "great, eternal iron laws" in Das Göttliche. [3] This theory suggested that growing population rates would contribute to a rising supply of labour that would inevitably lower wages. In essence, Malthus feared that continued population growth would lend itself to poverty and famine.

    Population Distribution
    Population distribution means the pattern of where people live. World population distribution is uneven. Places which are sparsely populated contain few people. Places which are densely populated contain many people. Sparsely populated places tend to be difficult places to live. These are usually places with hostile environments e.g. Antarctica. Places which are densely populated are habitable environments e.g. Europe.

    Population Density
    Population density is a measurement of the number of people in an area. It is an average number. Population density is calculated by dividing the number of people by area. Population density is usually shown as the number of people per square kilometer. The map below is a choropleth (shading) map and illustrates population density. The darker the colour the greater the population density.

    Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) Applies to the most advanced stages of HIV infection. It is defined by the occurrence of any of more than 20 opportunistic infections or HIV-related cancers.

    Age-Dependency Ratio The ratio of persons in the ages defined as dependent (under 15 years and over 64 years) to persons in the ages defined as economically productive (15-64 years) in a population.

    India accounts just 2.4 per cent of the world surface, but it supports and sustains a whopping 16.7 per cent of the world population.

    The population of India, as recorded at each decennial census from 1901 has grown steadily except for a decrease during 1911-21. Decadal growth of population from 1901 is shown in table 1.

    Paul Andersen explains how ecosystems interact with biotic and abiotic factors. He explains and gives examples of food chains and food webs. He shows how limiting factors eventually leads to logistic growth. Real data from Yellowstone Park is used to show how populations interact.

    The term "natural increase," refers to population increases. So far, so good. But as economists use the term, the result could be negative. And who s to say what s natural?

    "Natural increase" is a term used in economics, geography, sociology and population studies. In simplest terms, it is the birth rate minus the death rate. Birth rate in this context almost always refers to the annual number of births per thousand in a given population.

    One of the most important aspects of India’s population is its uneven distribution. On one hand the population of India is highly concentrated in some pockets such as highly urbanized and industrialised areas and areas of high agricultural productivity, while on the other hand there are virtually demographic deserts in high mountains, arid lands, thickly forested areas and some remote corners of the country.

    Such a situation needs some explanation and the explanation is found, to a great extent, by the study of some geographical factors which affect the distribution and density of population in a given area. Besides some social, demographic, political and historical factors play their own role in influencing the distribution and density of population. It may further be emphasised that these factors act in totality and not individually.

  13. author
    User1491373000 18 Jan 2017 02:56

    Click here essay on increase in population density

    The book An Essay on the Principle of Population was first published anonymously in 1798, [1] but the author was soon identified as Thomas Robert Malthus. The book predicted a grim future, as population would increase geometrically, doubling every 25 years, [2] but food production would only grow arithmetically, which would result in famine and starvation, unless births were controlled. [2]

    While it was not the first book on population, it was revised for over 28 years and has been acknowledged as the most influential work of its era. Malthus''s book fuelled debate about the size of the population in the Kingdom of Great Britain and contributed to the passing of the Census Act 1800. This Act enabled the holding of a national census in England, Wales and Scotland, starting in 1801 and continuing every ten years to the present. The book''s 6th edition (1826) was independently cited as a key influence by both Charles Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace in developing the theory of natural selection.

  14. author
    bigdog561 18 Jan 2017 08:10

    The book An Essay on the Principle of Population was first published anonymously in 1798, [1] but the author was soon identified as Thomas Robert Malthus. The book predicted a grim future, as population would increase geometrically, doubling every 25 years, [2] but food production would only grow arithmetically, which would result in famine and starvation, unless births were controlled. [2]

    A key portion of the book was dedicated to what is now known as Malthus'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''' Iron Law of Population. This name itself is retrospective, based on the iron law of wages , which is the reformulation of Malthus'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''' position by Ferdinand Lassalle , who in turn derived the name from Goethe ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s "great, eternal iron laws" in Das Göttliche. [3] This theory suggested that growing population rates would contribute to a rising supply of labour that would inevitably lower wages. In essence, Malthus feared that continued population growth would lend itself to poverty and famine.

    Population Distribution
    Population distribution means the pattern of where people live. World population distribution is uneven. Places which are sparsely populated contain few people. Places which are densely populated contain many people. Sparsely populated places tend to be difficult places to live. These are usually places with hostile environments e.g. Antarctica. Places which are densely populated are habitable environments e.g. Europe.

    Population Density
    Population density is a measurement of the number of people in an area. It is an average number. Population density is calculated by dividing the number of people by area. Population density is usually shown as the number of people per square kilometer. The map below is a choropleth (shading) map and illustrates population density. The darker the colour the greater the population density.

    Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) Applies to the most advanced stages of HIV infection. It is defined by the occurrence of any of more than 20 opportunistic infections or HIV-related cancers.

    Age-Dependency Ratio The ratio of persons in the ages defined as dependent (under 15 years and over 64 years) to persons in the ages defined as economically productive (15-64 years) in a population.

    India accounts just 2.4 per cent of the world surface, but it supports and sustains a whopping 16.7 per cent of the world population.

    The population of India, as recorded at each decennial census from 1901 has grown steadily except for a decrease during 1911-21. Decadal growth of population from 1901 is shown in table 1.

    Paul Andersen explains how ecosystems interact with biotic and abiotic factors. He explains and gives examples of food chains and food webs. He shows how limiting factors eventually leads to logistic growth. Real data from Yellowstone Park is used to show how populations interact.