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Comments on: The Effects of Population Growth on Land Use

18 Jan 2017 21:24 | Author: ticklishkoala261 | Category: Introduction premarital sex term paper

Todd G. Buchholz is a former White House director of economic policy under President George H.W. Bush, managing director of the Tiger hedge fund and the.

Comments
  1. author
    lazymouse501 17 Jan 2017 22:00

    The book An Essay on the Principle of Population was first published anonymously in 1798, [1] [2] but the author was soon identified as Thomas Robert Malthus. The book predicted a grim future, as population would increase geometrically, doubling every 25 years, [3] but food production would only grow arithmetically, which would result in famine and starvation, unless births were controlled. [3]

    A key portion of the book was dedicated to what is now known as Malthus'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''' Iron Law of Population. This name itself is retrospective, based on the iron law of wages , which is the reformulation of Malthus'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''' position by Ferdinand Lassalle , who in turn derived the name from Goethe ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s "great, eternal iron laws" in Das Göttliche. [4] This theory suggested that growing population rates would contribute to a rising supply of labour that would inevitably lower wages. In essence, Malthus feared that continued population growth would lend itself to poverty and famine.

    For most countries, population growth rate is approximately 2-3% a year, which should translate to an annual increase of 3-5% in agriculture production levels. (Kendall and Pimentel, 1994: 202) Kendall and Pimentel designed three models to predict crop levels by 2050. They concluded that if production continues at its current rate, per capita crop production will decline by 2050. The possibility of tripling today’s current crop production is unrealistic (Kendall and Pimentel, 1994).

    Food insecurity has the potential for worsening far beyond anyone’s expectations. Have we finally reached Earth’s carrying capacity? Scholars’ opinions vary depending on their perspective. While Neo-Malthusian scholars such as Paul Elhrich(2009) believe that the only way to avoid this catastrophe is by restraining population growth, others such as Rusell Hopfenberg(2003) assert that we must curb food production to limit population growth.

    A loosely defined goal of ZPG is to match the replacement fertility rate , which is the average number of children per woman which would hold the population constant. This replacement fertility will depend on mortality rates and the sex ratio at birth, and varies from around 2.1 in developed countries to over 3.0 in some developing countries. [5]

    The American sociologist and demographer Kingsley Davis is credited with coining the term [6] [7] but it was used earlier by George Stolnitz, who stated that the concept of a stationary population dated back to 1693. [8] A mathematical description was given by James Mirrlees. [9]

    In 2014, our partners signed the Chesapeake Bay Watershed Agreement, establishing goals, outcomes and management strategies to guide the restoration of the Bay, its tributaries and the lands around them.

    With its strong economy, diverse communities and rich natural and historic resources, it’s no wonder that just over 18 million people call the Chesapeake Bay watershed home. But the region’s rapid rate of population growth has raised concern over whether the watershed can continue to sustain the plants, animals and people that live here.

  2. author
    purpleswan187 17 Jan 2017 23:13

    The book An Essay on the Principle of Population was first published anonymously in 1798, [1] [2] but the author was soon identified as Thomas Robert Malthus. The book predicted a grim future, as population would increase geometrically, doubling every 25 years, [3] but food production would only grow arithmetically, which would result in famine and starvation, unless births were controlled. [3]

    A key portion of the book was dedicated to what is now known as Malthus'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''' Iron Law of Population. This name itself is retrospective, based on the iron law of wages , which is the reformulation of Malthus'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''' position by Ferdinand Lassalle , who in turn derived the name from Goethe ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s "great, eternal iron laws" in Das Göttliche. [4] This theory suggested that growing population rates would contribute to a rising supply of labour that would inevitably lower wages. In essence, Malthus feared that continued population growth would lend itself to poverty and famine.

    For most countries, population growth rate is approximately 2-3% a year, which should translate to an annual increase of 3-5% in agriculture production levels. (Kendall and Pimentel, 1994: 202) Kendall and Pimentel designed three models to predict crop levels by 2050. They concluded that if production continues at its current rate, per capita crop production will decline by 2050. The possibility of tripling today’s current crop production is unrealistic (Kendall and Pimentel, 1994).

    Food insecurity has the potential for worsening far beyond anyone’s expectations. Have we finally reached Earth’s carrying capacity? Scholars’ opinions vary depending on their perspective. While Neo-Malthusian scholars such as Paul Elhrich(2009) believe that the only way to avoid this catastrophe is by restraining population growth, others such as Rusell Hopfenberg(2003) assert that we must curb food production to limit population growth.

    A loosely defined goal of ZPG is to match the replacement fertility rate , which is the average number of children per woman which would hold the population constant. This replacement fertility will depend on mortality rates and the sex ratio at birth, and varies from around 2.1 in developed countries to over 3.0 in some developing countries. [5]

    The American sociologist and demographer Kingsley Davis is credited with coining the term [6] [7] but it was used earlier by George Stolnitz, who stated that the concept of a stationary population dated back to 1693. [8] A mathematical description was given by James Mirrlees. [9]

    In 2014, our partners signed the Chesapeake Bay Watershed Agreement, establishing goals, outcomes and management strategies to guide the restoration of the Bay, its tributaries and the lands around them.

    With its strong economy, diverse communities and rich natural and historic resources, it’s no wonder that just over 18 million people call the Chesapeake Bay watershed home. But the region’s rapid rate of population growth has raised concern over whether the watershed can continue to sustain the plants, animals and people that live here.

  3. author
    ticklishostrich415 18 Jan 2017 00:24

    The book An Essay on the Principle of Population was first published anonymously in 1798, [1] [2] but the author was soon identified as Thomas Robert Malthus. The book predicted a grim future, as population would increase geometrically, doubling every 25 years, [3] but food production would only grow arithmetically, which would result in famine and starvation, unless births were controlled. [3]

    A key portion of the book was dedicated to what is now known as Malthus'' Iron Law of Population. This name itself is retrospective, based on the iron law of wages , which is the reformulation of Malthus'' position by Ferdinand Lassalle , who in turn derived the name from Goethe ''s "great, eternal iron laws" in Das Göttliche. [4] This theory suggested that growing population rates would contribute to a rising supply of labour that would inevitably lower wages. In essence, Malthus feared that continued population growth would lend itself to poverty and famine.

    For most countries, population growth rate is approximately 2-3% a year, which should translate to an annual increase of 3-5% in agriculture production levels. (Kendall and Pimentel, 1994: 202) Kendall and Pimentel designed three models to predict crop levels by 2050. They concluded that if production continues at its current rate, per capita crop production will decline by 2050. The possibility of tripling today’s current crop production is unrealistic (Kendall and Pimentel, 1994).

    Food insecurity has the potential for worsening far beyond anyone’s expectations. Have we finally reached Earth’s carrying capacity? Scholars’ opinions vary depending on their perspective. While Neo-Malthusian scholars such as Paul Elhrich(2009) believe that the only way to avoid this catastrophe is by restraining population growth, others such as Rusell Hopfenberg(2003) assert that we must curb food production to limit population growth.

  4. author
    whitepanda568 18 Jan 2017 02:16

    The book An Essay on the Principle of Population was first published anonymously in 1798, [1] [2] but the author was soon identified as Thomas Robert Malthus. The book predicted a grim future, as population would increase geometrically, doubling every 25 years, [3] but food production would only grow arithmetically, which would result in famine and starvation, unless births were controlled. [3]

    A key portion of the book was dedicated to what is now known as Malthus'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''' Iron Law of Population. This name itself is retrospective, based on the iron law of wages , which is the reformulation of Malthus'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''' position by Ferdinand Lassalle , who in turn derived the name from Goethe ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s "great, eternal iron laws" in Das Göttliche. [4] This theory suggested that growing population rates would contribute to a rising supply of labour that would inevitably lower wages. In essence, Malthus feared that continued population growth would lend itself to poverty and famine.

    For most countries, population growth rate is approximately 2-3% a year, which should translate to an annual increase of 3-5% in agriculture production levels. (Kendall and Pimentel, 1994: 202) Kendall and Pimentel designed three models to predict crop levels by 2050. They concluded that if production continues at its current rate, per capita crop production will decline by 2050. The possibility of tripling today’s current crop production is unrealistic (Kendall and Pimentel, 1994).

    Food insecurity has the potential for worsening far beyond anyone’s expectations. Have we finally reached Earth’s carrying capacity? Scholars’ opinions vary depending on their perspective. While Neo-Malthusian scholars such as Paul Elhrich(2009) believe that the only way to avoid this catastrophe is by restraining population growth, others such as Rusell Hopfenberg(2003) assert that we must curb food production to limit population growth.

    A loosely defined goal of ZPG is to match the replacement fertility rate , which is the average number of children per woman which would hold the population constant. This replacement fertility will depend on mortality rates and the sex ratio at birth, and varies from around 2.1 in developed countries to over 3.0 in some developing countries. [5]

    The American sociologist and demographer Kingsley Davis is credited with coining the term [6] [7] but it was used earlier by George Stolnitz, who stated that the concept of a stationary population dated back to 1693. [8] A mathematical description was given by James Mirrlees. [9]

    In 2014, our partners signed the Chesapeake Bay Watershed Agreement, establishing goals, outcomes and management strategies to guide the restoration of the Bay, its tributaries and the lands around them.

    With its strong economy, diverse communities and rich natural and historic resources, it’s no wonder that just over 18 million people call the Chesapeake Bay watershed home. But the region’s rapid rate of population growth has raised concern over whether the watershed can continue to sustain the plants, animals and people that live here.

  5. author
    Альфред Батряк 18 Jan 2017 08:56

    The book An Essay on the Principle of Population was first published anonymously in 1798, [1] [2] but the author was soon identified as Thomas Robert Malthus. The book predicted a grim future, as population would increase geometrically, doubling every 25 years, [3] but food production would only grow arithmetically, which would result in famine and starvation, unless births were controlled. [3]

    A key portion of the book was dedicated to what is now known as Malthus'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''' Iron Law of Population. This name itself is retrospective, based on the iron law of wages , which is the reformulation of Malthus'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''' position by Ferdinand Lassalle , who in turn derived the name from Goethe ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s "great, eternal iron laws" in Das Göttliche. [4] This theory suggested that growing population rates would contribute to a rising supply of labour that would inevitably lower wages. In essence, Malthus feared that continued population growth would lend itself to poverty and famine.

    For most countries, population growth rate is approximately 2-3% a year, which should translate to an annual increase of 3-5% in agriculture production levels. (Kendall and Pimentel, 1994: 202) Kendall and Pimentel designed three models to predict crop levels by 2050. They concluded that if production continues at its current rate, per capita crop production will decline by 2050. The possibility of tripling today’s current crop production is unrealistic (Kendall and Pimentel, 1994).

    Food insecurity has the potential for worsening far beyond anyone’s expectations. Have we finally reached Earth’s carrying capacity? Scholars’ opinions vary depending on their perspective. While Neo-Malthusian scholars such as Paul Elhrich(2009) believe that the only way to avoid this catastrophe is by restraining population growth, others such as Rusell Hopfenberg(2003) assert that we must curb food production to limit population growth.

    A loosely defined goal of ZPG is to match the replacement fertility rate , which is the average number of children per woman which would hold the population constant. This replacement fertility will depend on mortality rates and the sex ratio at birth, and varies from around 2.1 in developed countries to over 3.0 in some developing countries. [5]

    The American sociologist and demographer Kingsley Davis is credited with coining the term [6] [7] but it was used earlier by George Stolnitz, who stated that the concept of a stationary population dated back to 1693. [8] A mathematical description was given by James Mirrlees. [9]

    In 2014, our partners signed the Chesapeake Bay Watershed Agreement, establishing goals, outcomes and management strategies to guide the restoration of the Bay, its tributaries and the lands around them.

    With its strong economy, diverse communities and rich natural and historic resources, it’s no wonder that just over 18 million people call the Chesapeake Bay watershed home. But the region’s rapid rate of population growth has raised concern over whether the watershed can continue to sustain the plants, animals and people that live here.

  6. author
    User1488493976 18 Jan 2017 01:20

    The world's population will soon reach a level where there will not be enough resources to sustain life as we know it. Growth must be checked to avoid this catastrophe.

  7. author
    organicdog905 17 Jan 2017 22:58

    The book An Essay on the Principle of Population was first published anonymously in 1798, [1] [2] but the author was soon identified as Thomas Robert Malthus. The book predicted a grim future, as population would increase geometrically, doubling every 25 years, [3] but food production would only grow arithmetically, which would result in famine and starvation, unless births were controlled. [3]

    A key portion of the book was dedicated to what is now known as Malthus'''' Iron Law of Population. This name itself is retrospective, based on the iron law of wages , which is the reformulation of Malthus'''' position by Ferdinand Lassalle , who in turn derived the name from Goethe ''''s "great, eternal iron laws" in Das Göttliche. [4] This theory suggested that growing population rates would contribute to a rising supply of labour that would inevitably lower wages. In essence, Malthus feared that continued population growth would lend itself to poverty and famine.

    For most countries, population growth rate is approximately 2-3% a year, which should translate to an annual increase of 3-5% in agriculture production levels. (Kendall and Pimentel, 1994: 202) Kendall and Pimentel designed three models to predict crop levels by 2050. They concluded that if production continues at its current rate, per capita crop production will decline by 2050. The possibility of tripling today’s current crop production is unrealistic (Kendall and Pimentel, 1994).

    Food insecurity has the potential for worsening far beyond anyone’s expectations. Have we finally reached Earth’s carrying capacity? Scholars’ opinions vary depending on their perspective. While Neo-Malthusian scholars such as Paul Elhrich(2009) believe that the only way to avoid this catastrophe is by restraining population growth, others such as Rusell Hopfenberg(2003) assert that we must curb food production to limit population growth.

  8. author
    Гена Тимошенко 17 Jan 2017 22:53

    Order essay here essay on growth of population and food

    Todd G. Buchholz is a former White House director of economic policy under President George H.W. Bush, managing director of the Tiger hedge fund and the.

  9. author
    organicfrog369 18 Jan 2017 06:14

    The book An Essay on the Principle of Population was first published anonymously in 1798, [1] [2] but the author was soon identified as Thomas Robert Malthus. The book predicted a grim future, as population would increase geometrically, doubling every 25 years, [3] but food production would only grow arithmetically, which would result in famine and starvation, unless births were controlled. [3]

    A key portion of the book was dedicated to what is now known as Malthus'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''' Iron Law of Population. This name itself is retrospective, based on the iron law of wages , which is the reformulation of Malthus'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''' position by Ferdinand Lassalle , who in turn derived the name from Goethe ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s "great, eternal iron laws" in Das Göttliche. [4] This theory suggested that growing population rates would contribute to a rising supply of labour that would inevitably lower wages. In essence, Malthus feared that continued population growth would lend itself to poverty and famine.

    For most countries, population growth rate is approximately 2-3% a year, which should translate to an annual increase of 3-5% in agriculture production levels. (Kendall and Pimentel, 1994: 202) Kendall and Pimentel designed three models to predict crop levels by 2050. They concluded that if production continues at its current rate, per capita crop production will decline by 2050. The possibility of tripling today’s current crop production is unrealistic (Kendall and Pimentel, 1994).

    Food insecurity has the potential for worsening far beyond anyone’s expectations. Have we finally reached Earth’s carrying capacity? Scholars’ opinions vary depending on their perspective. While Neo-Malthusian scholars such as Paul Elhrich(2009) believe that the only way to avoid this catastrophe is by restraining population growth, others such as Rusell Hopfenberg(2003) assert that we must curb food production to limit population growth.

    A loosely defined goal of ZPG is to match the replacement fertility rate , which is the average number of children per woman which would hold the population constant. This replacement fertility will depend on mortality rates and the sex ratio at birth, and varies from around 2.1 in developed countries to over 3.0 in some developing countries. [5]

    The American sociologist and demographer Kingsley Davis is credited with coining the term [6] [7] but it was used earlier by George Stolnitz, who stated that the concept of a stationary population dated back to 1693. [8] A mathematical description was given by James Mirrlees. [9]

    In 2014, our partners signed the Chesapeake Bay Watershed Agreement, establishing goals, outcomes and management strategies to guide the restoration of the Bay, its tributaries and the lands around them.

    With its strong economy, diverse communities and rich natural and historic resources, it’s no wonder that just over 18 million people call the Chesapeake Bay watershed home. But the region’s rapid rate of population growth has raised concern over whether the watershed can continue to sustain the plants, animals and people that live here.

  10. author
    y ϋ п а 18 Jan 2017 01:01

    The book An Essay on the Principle of Population was first published anonymously in 1798, [1] [2] but the author was soon identified as Thomas Robert Malthus. The book predicted a grim future, as population would increase geometrically, doubling every 25 years, [3] but food production would only grow arithmetically, which would result in famine and starvation, unless births were controlled. [3]

    A key portion of the book was dedicated to what is now known as Malthus'''''''' Iron Law of Population. This name itself is retrospective, based on the iron law of wages , which is the reformulation of Malthus'''''''' position by Ferdinand Lassalle , who in turn derived the name from Goethe ''''''''s "great, eternal iron laws" in Das Göttliche. [4] This theory suggested that growing population rates would contribute to a rising supply of labour that would inevitably lower wages. In essence, Malthus feared that continued population growth would lend itself to poverty and famine.

    For most countries, population growth rate is approximately 2-3% a year, which should translate to an annual increase of 3-5% in agriculture production levels. (Kendall and Pimentel, 1994: 202) Kendall and Pimentel designed three models to predict crop levels by 2050. They concluded that if production continues at its current rate, per capita crop production will decline by 2050. The possibility of tripling today’s current crop production is unrealistic (Kendall and Pimentel, 1994).

    Food insecurity has the potential for worsening far beyond anyone’s expectations. Have we finally reached Earth’s carrying capacity? Scholars’ opinions vary depending on their perspective. While Neo-Malthusian scholars such as Paul Elhrich(2009) believe that the only way to avoid this catastrophe is by restraining population growth, others such as Rusell Hopfenberg(2003) assert that we must curb food production to limit population growth.

    A loosely defined goal of ZPG is to match the replacement fertility rate , which is the average number of children per woman which would hold the population constant. This replacement fertility will depend on mortality rates and the sex ratio at birth, and varies from around 2.1 in developed countries to over 3.0 in some developing countries. [5]

    The American sociologist and demographer Kingsley Davis is credited with coining the term [6] [7] but it was used earlier by George Stolnitz, who stated that the concept of a stationary population dated back to 1693. [8] A mathematical description was given by James Mirrlees. [9]

  11. author
    Ириночка 18 Jan 2017 00:06

    The book An Essay on the Principle of Population was first published anonymously in 1798, [1] [2] but the author was soon identified as Thomas Robert Malthus. The book predicted a grim future, as population would increase geometrically, doubling every 25 years, [3] but food production would only grow arithmetically, which would result in famine and starvation, unless births were controlled. [3]

    A key portion of the book was dedicated to what is now known as Malthus'''''''''''''''' Iron Law of Population. This name itself is retrospective, based on the iron law of wages , which is the reformulation of Malthus'''''''''''''''' position by Ferdinand Lassalle , who in turn derived the name from Goethe ''''''''''''''''s "great, eternal iron laws" in Das Göttliche. [4] This theory suggested that growing population rates would contribute to a rising supply of labour that would inevitably lower wages. In essence, Malthus feared that continued population growth would lend itself to poverty and famine.

    For most countries, population growth rate is approximately 2-3% a year, which should translate to an annual increase of 3-5% in agriculture production levels. (Kendall and Pimentel, 1994: 202) Kendall and Pimentel designed three models to predict crop levels by 2050. They concluded that if production continues at its current rate, per capita crop production will decline by 2050. The possibility of tripling today’s current crop production is unrealistic (Kendall and Pimentel, 1994).

    Food insecurity has the potential for worsening far beyond anyone’s expectations. Have we finally reached Earth’s carrying capacity? Scholars’ opinions vary depending on their perspective. While Neo-Malthusian scholars such as Paul Elhrich(2009) believe that the only way to avoid this catastrophe is by restraining population growth, others such as Rusell Hopfenberg(2003) assert that we must curb food production to limit population growth.

    A loosely defined goal of ZPG is to match the replacement fertility rate , which is the average number of children per woman which would hold the population constant. This replacement fertility will depend on mortality rates and the sex ratio at birth, and varies from around 2.1 in developed countries to over 3.0 in some developing countries. [5]

    The American sociologist and demographer Kingsley Davis is credited with coining the term [6] [7] but it was used earlier by George Stolnitz, who stated that the concept of a stationary population dated back to 1693. [8] A mathematical description was given by James Mirrlees. [9]

  12. author
    yellowdog648 18 Jan 2017 04:10

    Organic Food Essay

  13. author
    goldenostrich437 18 Jan 2017 05:59

    GM FOOD GM food has increased over the last years. Genetic modified food is food what has been genetically modified by organisms. These organisms have had some changes to their DNA that make the food bigger, stronger, more durable and cheaper. Genetically modified food has a number of advantages. This kind of food always has higher performance, higher growth and pest resistance. The periods of cultivation of GM food are shorter, so you can get more food in less time, you are also able to produce more. Moreover, GM food is bigger, it looks better, it lasts more time and it is cheaper. However, GM food has many disadvantages. They have fewer nutrients even though they are bigger, they tend to have less taste and can seem strange when you eat it, GM foods can even weaken your immune system. GM food has also been known to produce cancer. Probably the worst thing about GM food is that you don’t really know what you are eating. In conclusion, I think that GM food has just as many advantages as disadvantages, so I cannot say if I am against it or for it. It is cheaper, bigger, and lasts longer, but it has less flavor, weakens the immune system, and has been known to cause cancer. Even though I don t particularly think GM food is good or bad, if I had to choose one, I would be against it. Good Luck!